• fatigue
  • A drop in red blood cell count (anemia) can cause fatigue, paleness, and shortness of breath. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some generalized symptoms include fever, fatigue, weight loss or loss of appetite, shortness of breath, anemia, easy bruising or bleeding, petechiae (flat, pin-head sized spots under the skin caused by bleeding), bone and joint pain, and persistent or frequent infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • weak
  • Individuals who suffer with pernicious anaemia typically experience tiredness and feel weak, because there is insufficient oxygen travelling around the body. (medic8.com)
  • cause anemia
  • In rats a marginal iron deficiency that does not cause anemia disrupted axon growth in the auditory nerve affecting auditory brainstem latency without major changes in myelination. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • Your doctor will diagnose pernicious anemia based on your medical and family histories, a physical exam, and the results from tests. (onlymyhealth.com)
  • George Richards Minot (December 2, 1885 - February 25, 1950) was an American medical researcher who shared the 1934 Nobel Prize with George Hoyt Whipple and William P. Murphy for their pioneering work on pernicious anemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1915, he secured a junior position on the medical staff of the Massachusetts General Hospital, where he started research on blood anemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • disease
  • Pernicious anemia seems to run in families, so that anyone with a relative diagnosed with the disease has a greater likelihood of developing it as well. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In the present paper are presented the considerations which have convinced the writer that pernicious anemia and sprue are two distinct disease entities, and that the former is not a final picture of the latter or vice-versa, as Christian (1) and others have suggested. (ajtmh.org)
  • lower
  • In conclusion, the lower oesophageal sphincter in pernicious anaemia is characterized both by a low resting pressure and a decreased response to endogenous and exogenous stimuli. (bmj.com)