• intraocular lens
  • This study was conducted for evaluating and comparing levels of patient discomfort during phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation under topical and peribulbar anesthesia and comparative assessment of intra-operative complications. (peertechz.com)
  • sclera
  • The idea of the central crystalline lens was widely believed from Hunayn's period through the late 1500s.He describes the system behind the eyes that connects it to the brain, starting with the sclera, a thick, hard membrane which protects the inner parts of the nerves from injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • fetal
  • RetCam3 image of the eye of a 4-year-old boy born at 41 weeks with a subluxated cataractous crystalline lens, persistent fetal vasculature, and coloboma. (retinatoday.com)
  • Moving outwards from the central, oldest layer, the lens is split into an embryonic nucleus, the fetal nucleus, the adult nucleus, and the outer cortex. (wikipedia.org)
  • spherical
  • The cornea has greater refractive power which is static, but the lens is a unique biological structure that relies on an extraordinarily intricate arrangement of highly specialized cells to produce a gradient of refractive index that allows for remarkable dynamic focusing of an image with minimal spherical or chromatic aberration . (springer.com)
  • Controlled by software, tiny motors on the lens assembly and spherical camera casing allow the lens to pan and track objects. (oxforddictionaries.com)
  • As opposed to Galen's more mathematical conception of flat-like lens, Hunayn opts for a more spherical shape which allows for a larger field of vision. (wikipedia.org)
  • eye's
  • In humans, the refractive power of the lens in its natural environment is approximately 18 dioptres, roughly one-third of the eye's total power. (wikipedia.org)
  • The long-standing medical consensus is that this is accomplished by action of the ciliary muscle, a muscle within the eye, which adjusts the curvature of the eye's crystalline lens. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medical professionals characterize refractive errors such as nearsightedness, farsightedness, astigmatism, and presbyopia (the age-related blurring of near-point vision) as consequences of the eye's shape and other basic anatomy, which there is no evidence that any exercise can alter. (wikipedia.org)
  • corneal
  • In order to understand how corneal surgery can help treat corneal disease and refractive error , it is helpful to review the important parts of the corneal anatomy. (improveyourvision.com)
  • There are also surgical treatments for far-sightedness: Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) Removal of a minimal amount of the corneal surface Laser assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) Laser eye surgery to reshape the cornea, so that glasses or contact lenses are no longer needed. (wikipedia.org)
  • corrective
  • If you have vision problems, and you have been prescribed to use corrective prescription eyewear, you need to wear a lens/glass as per that. (feedage.com)
  • The Bates method has been criticized not only because there is no good evidence it works, but also because it can have negative consequences for those who attempt to follow it: they might damage their eyes through overexposure of their eyes to sunlight, put themselves and others at risk by not wearing their corrective lenses while driving, or neglect conventional eye care, possibly allowing serious conditions to develop. (wikipedia.org)
  • epithelial cells
  • As ions, nutrients, and liquid enter the lens from the aqueous humor, Na+/K+-ATPase pumps in the lens epithelial cells pump ions out of the lens to maintain appropriate lens osmotic concentration and volume, with equatorially positioned lens epithelium cells contributing most to this current. (wikipedia.org)
  • dislocation
  • In old-standing disease of the eye the suspensory ligament may yield in part, and thus lead to lens dislocation. (dictionary.com)
  • Mutations in the fibrillin gene lead to the condition Marfan syndrome, and consequences include an increased risk of lens dislocation. (wikipedia.org)
  • epithelium
  • It is synthesized by the lens epithelium and its main components are Type IV collagen and sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). (wikipedia.org)
  • The cells of the lens epithelium regulate most of the homeostatic functions of the lens. (wikipedia.org)
  • zonules
  • The lens and zonules. (springer.com)
  • When colour granules are displaced from the Zonules of Zinn (by friction against the lens), the irises slowly fade. (wikipedia.org)
  • The zonules insert around the outer margin of the lens (equator), both anteriorly and posteriorly. (wikipedia.org)
  • transparency
  • In anatomy, a crystallin is a water-soluble structural protein found in the lens and the cornea of the eye accounting for the transparency of the structure. (wikipedia.org)
  • It has been suggested that these functions are important for the maintenance of lens transparency and the prevention of cataracts. (wikipedia.org)
  • structure
  • On the growth and internal structure of the human lens. (springer.com)
  • Simple eyes of other animals, e.g. cnidarians, may also be referred to as ocelli, but again the structure and anatomy of these eyes is quite distinct from those of the dorsal ocelli of insects. (wikipedia.org)
  • 20th
  • Structures of the eye labeled This image shows another labeled view of the structures of the eye This article incorporates text in the public domain from the 20th edition of Gray's Anatomy (1918) Kaufman, Paul L. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hunayn
  • Hunayn relies on these principles to build up his conception of vision, which incorporates the anatomy of the eye in a way that makes discussion of one without the other unproductive. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hunayn repeatedly emphasized that he believed the crystalline lens to be in the exact center of the eye. (wikipedia.org)
  • single lens
  • A simple eye (sometimes called a pigment pit) refers to a type of eye form or optical arrangement that contains a single lens. (wikipedia.org)
  • In contrast to compound eyes, simple eyes are those that have a single lens. (wikipedia.org)
  • light
  • 4. A device or phenomenon (such as a gravitational field) that causes light or other radiation to converge or diverge by an action analogous to that of a lens. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • 2. To bend or distort (light, for example) by means of a lens, especially a gravitational field. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • When light passes through the cornea from the outside, it is bent, or refracted, as if passing through a lens. (improveyourvision.com)
  • The crystalline lens finishes the focusing of light. (eyecaretyler.com)
  • 1 A piece of glass or other transparent material with curved sides for concentrating or dispersing light rays, used singly (as in a magnifying glass) or with other lenses (as in a telescope). (oxforddictionaries.com)
  • Each cluster acts as a magnifying lens, greatly brightening a quasar's light. (oxforddictionaries.com)
  • These foreground clusters act as lenses that magnify the light of the protogalaxies and allow us to detect and study them. (oxforddictionaries.com)
  • Light flashed across the round lenses of his glasses. (oxforddictionaries.com)
  • The lens that picks up the light from the focal point is called the eyepiece lens. (oxforddictionaries.com)
  • I have two pairs of glasses with different coloured lenses for different light conditions. (oxforddictionaries.com)
  • 1.1 The light-gathering device of a camera, typically containing a group of compound lenses. (oxforddictionaries.com)
  • While both the conjuctiva and cornea provide protection with minimizing hindrance to the lenses, the uvea has an extra function of concentrating the pneuma exiting out of the eye to prevent it from being dissipated by light. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many insects have compound eyes consisting of multiple lenses (up to tens of thousands), each focusing light onto a small number of retinula cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • transparent
  • Most conventional lenses are made of glass, polymer, or other transparent solid materials. (oxforddictionaries.com)
  • The lens, described as white, transparent, and luminous have a composition which lends itself to quickly receive colors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Whether these crystallins are products of a fortuitous accident of evolution, in that these particular enzymes happened to be transparent and highly soluble, or whether these diverse enzymatic activities are part of the protective machinery of the lens, is an active research topic. (wikipedia.org)
  • small
  • Divergence probably occurred prior to evolution of the eye lens, alpha-crystallin being found in small amounts in tissues outside the lens. (wikipedia.org)
  • optic
  • The first stage of lens differentiation takes place when the optic vesicle, which is formed from outpocketings in the neural ectoderm, comes in proximity to the surface ectoderm. (wikipedia.org)
  • glasses
  • January is a time where people tend to make resolutions to maybe lose weight, stop smoking, etc. but some people will be finally making the resolution to get their vision corrected by more than just glasses or contact lenses. (feedage.com)
  • Galileo's telescope was similar to a pair of opera glasses in that it used an arrangement of glass lenses to magnify objects. (oxforddictionaries.com)
  • Because of the extreme curve of the glasses, the lenses are hard to fit to a frame - and that makes them costly. (oxforddictionaries.com)
  • If you wear glasses have your reading lens fitted to your polarized ones. (oxforddictionaries.com)
  • Glasses are easiest while contact lenses can provide a wider field of vision. (wikipedia.org)
  • focuses
  • The eyes of most cephalopods, fish, amphibians and snakes have fixed lens shapes, and focusing vision is achieved by telescoping the lens-similar to how a camera focuses. (wikipedia.org)
  • typically
  • In the adult, the lens is typically circa 10 mm in diameter and has an axial length of about 4 mm, though it is important to note that the size and shape can change due to accommodation and because the lens continues to grow throughout a person's lifetime. (wikipedia.org)
  • The refractive power of the lens is not typically sufficient to form an image on the photoreceptor layer. (wikipedia.org)
  • shape
  • This muscle changes the shape of the lens when your eyes focus on something. (herbalyzer.com)
  • These muscles relax and contract in order to change the shape of the lens. (physicsclassroom.com)
  • Changes in the shape of the lens will allow a normal eye to focus on near objects. (eyecaretyler.com)
  • There are four essential doctrines that shape Hunayn's dissertation on vision and the anatomy of the eye: Structural order - the individual components of the eye each have their own nature, and are arranged so that they are in cosmological harmony. (wikipedia.org)
  • This explanation is based in the observed effect of atropine temporarily preventing accommodation when applied to the ciliary muscle, as well as images reflected on the crystalline lens becoming smaller as the eye shifts focus to a closer point, indicating a change in the lens' shape. (wikipedia.org)
  • human
  • The refracting power of the human eye is contributed by the cornea and the lens. (springer.com)
  • Anatomy of the human body. (springer.com)
  • To examine the morphometry of human crystalline lenses using a miniature shadowphotogrammetric system. (arvojournals.org)
  • The Anatomy of the Human Peritoneum and Abdominal Cavity George. (dictionary.com)
  • Davi Bock, Group Leader at Janelia Farm Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute will be delivering a seminar in the Eccles Institute of Human Genetics auditorium on Neuronal Network Anatomy From Large-Scale Electron Microscopy on Wednesday, October 29th at 4:00pm. (utah.edu)
  • Development of the human lens begins at the 4 mm embryonic stage. (wikipedia.org)
  • The discipline applies to all animal eyes, whether human or not, since the practice and procedures are quite similar with respect to disease processes, while differences in anatomy or disease prevalence, whether subtle or substantial, may differentiate the two. (wikipedia.org)
  • The anatomy of the human eye makes desquamation of the lens impossible. (wikipedia.org)