• pupillary
  • On the inner edge lies a prominent structure, the collarette, marking the junction of the embryonic pupillary membrane covering the embryonic pupil. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mid-pupillary line, a line running vertically down the face through the midpoint of the pupil when looking directly forward. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other places smooth muscle can be found are within the uterus, where it helps facilitate birth, and the eye, where the pupillary sphincter controls pupil size. (wikipedia.org)
  • lens
  • The corresponding image of the aperture as seen through the back of the lens system is called the exit pupil . (wikipedia.org)
  • In that case, the exit pupil can be easily calculated as the diameter of the objective lens divided by the magnification. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the filament ends are inserted into the cleft of the capsule, the resilience of the filaments centers the lens behind the pupil. (google.com)
  • To regard an object, a wearer of a bifocal lens need only maneuver the head so that rays extending between the object-of-regard and the pupil pass through that portion of the bifocal lens having an optical correction appropriate for the range to that object. (google.co.uk)
  • Use of the Malyugin ring is a reliable and stable method of maintaining an adequate surgical pupil diameter both for femtosecond laser assisted capsulotomy and lens fragmentation with Lenx laser and subsequent phacoemulsification and IOL implantation. (omicsonline.org)
  • Anatomy
  • A pupil of John Hunter, he took over Hunter's position teaching anatomy at the Great Windmill Street School, and was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society. (wikipedia.org)
  • iris
  • The pupil is a hole located in the center of the iris of the eye that allows light to strike the retina. (wikipedia.org)
  • This may be due to the fact that the reflection of one's image in the pupil is a minuscule version of one's self The pupil is a hole located in the centre of the iris of the eye that allows light to strike the retina. (wikipedia.org)
  • The iris is a contractile structure, consisting mainly of smooth muscle, surrounding the pupil. (wikipedia.org)
  • Light enters the eye through the pupil, and the iris regulates the amount of light by controlling the size of the pupil. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the sphincter pupillae contract, the iris decreases or constricts the size of the pupil. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Malyugin pupil expansion device (Microsurgical Technology) has several advantages over traditional iris retractor hooks or other pupil dilating devices [ 1 ]. (omicsonline.org)
  • diameter
  • The term exit pupil is also sometimes used to refer to the diameter of the virtual aperture. (wikipedia.org)
  • By moving the card closer to or further away from the eyepiece, the disc of light will be minimized when the card is at the exit pupil, and the bright disc then shows the diameter of the pupil. (wikipedia.org)
  • physician
  • 4th-3rd century BC) a Greek physician who was a pupil of Chrysippus of Cnidos, and who lived therefore probably in the 4th and 3rd centuries BC. (wikipedia.org)
  • After this accident, he began to study painting under Franklin White, a pupil of the painter Chester Harding, on the advice of his physician, and was commissioned to do a series of anatomical drawings by Dr. James Swan in 1834. (wikipedia.org)
  • smaller
  • An astronomical telescope requires a large pupil because it is designed to be used for looking at dim objects at night, while a microscope will require a much smaller pupil since the object will be brightly illuminated. (wikipedia.org)
  • For instance, the pupil becomes smaller and less responsive to light. (blueridgenow.com)
  • Open
  • He was a dresser to Sir Astley Cooper, who advised him to open an anatomical school in Birmingham after he had become a member of the Royal College of Surgeons. (wikipedia.org)
  • system
  • In optics, the exit pupil is a virtual aperture in an optical system. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lizars in 1822 issued the work by which he is now known, A System of Anatomical Plates of the Human Body, accompanied with Descriptions, and Physiological, Pathological, and Surgical Observations, Edinburgh. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • Edinburgh was a leading European centre of anatomical study in the early 19th century, in a time when the demand for cadavers led to a shortfall in legal supply. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because of their efforts, Edinburgh became one of the leading European centres of anatomical study, alongside Leiden in the Netherlands and the Italian city of Padua. (wikipedia.org)
  • Later, she entered the Académie Julian for more serious study in drawing, supplementing her studio work by anatomical studies at the Ecole de médecine under Georges Chicotot. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • At this stage the pupils do not remain completely still, therefore may lead to oscillation, which may intensify and become known as hippus. (wikipedia.org)
  • sometimes
  • Older literature on optics sometimes refers to the exit pupil as the Ramsden disc, named after English instrument-maker Jesse Ramsden. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sometimes a pupil is selected, it is removed from its right anatomical brain and checked to see that the traction ventilation has not been reached. (ouzel.com)
  • features
  • Small eye size (low axial length, often associated with a hypermetropic refraction) and other anatomical or pathophysiological ocular features that increase the risk of pupil-block (increased resistance to flow of aqueous from the posterior to anterior chamber), are the major risk factors for PACG. (iapb.org)
  • especially
  • He was, according to Galen, the most celebrated of all the pupils of Quintus, and one of the tutors to Pelops, and distinguished himself especially by his anatomical knowledge. (wikipedia.org)
  • narrow
  • It appears black because light rays entering the pupil are either absorbed by the tissues inside the eye directly, or absorbed after diffuse reflections within the eye that mostly miss exiting the narrow pupil. (wikipedia.org)
  • Non dilating narrow pupils are a challenge for cataract surgeons. (omicsonline.org)
  • plane
  • The distance of the exit pupil from the sensor plane determines the range of angles of incidence that light will make with the sensor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Museum
  • Burke was hanged shortly afterwards, his corpse was dissected and his skeleton displayed at the Anatomical Museum of Edinburgh Medical School where, as of 2017, it remains. (wikipedia.org)
  • years
  • and seven years later he succeeded Schrön as head of the Naples Anatomical-Pathological Institute, a post he retained until his death. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Adie's pupil primarily affects women from 20 to 40 years of age. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Other pupils whom he trained for years have made history in Italian fencing right up to now in innumerable contests at the Olympics, World Cups and World Championships (FIS yearbooks) At the 1972 Munich Olympics he coached the women's foil team, helping Antonella Ragno to win a gold medal. (wikipedia.org)
  • distance
  • In the dark it will be the same at first, but will approach the maximum distance for a wide pupil 3 to 8 mm. (wikipedia.org)
  • bright
  • The exit pupil can be visualized by focusing the instrument on a bright, nondescript field, and holding a white card up to the eyepiece. (wikipedia.org)
  • small
  • Using the Malyugin ring we have achieved excellent results with FLACS in patients with small pupils, that were previously considered to be poor candidates for this procedure. (omicsonline.org)
  • work
  • Besides authoring an early work on the dangers of tobacco, The Use and Abuse of Tobacco, Lizars published a number of important and beautifully illustrated anatomical texts in the early 19th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • person
  • An anomaly of etymology is that in a surprising number of unrelated languages the meaning of the term for pupil is little person. (wikipedia.org)
  • excellent
  • Although he had received excellent classical anatomical pathological training, Pianese was above all a histopathologist, with a broad background in microbiology, who was also concerned with general histopathology and experimental biology. (encyclopedia.com)
  • main
  • The Malyugin pupil expansion device (Microsurgical Technology) was inserted through the main port incision via the injector. (omicsonline.org)
  • light
  • The pupil gets wider in the dark and narrower in light. (wikipedia.org)
  • A clear vial of milky fluid can also be used to visualize the light rays, which appear as an hourglass shape converging and diverging as they exit the eyepiece, with the smallest cross-section (the waist of the hourglass shape) representing the exit pupil. (wikipedia.org)
  • hospital
  • Eventually he rose to be anatomical lecturer, assistant-surgeon and surgeon to the hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • Grainger opened an anatomical school in Webb Street, Southwark, London in 1819 after his offer to teach at Guy's Hospital was rejected. (wikipedia.org)
  • Grainger's school had the favour of the resurrection men, speedily rivalled the hospital schools, and drew pupils from them. (wikipedia.org)