• South Africa
  • Crocidolite asbestos was mined in South Africa, Bolivia and also at Wittenoom, Western Australia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Asbestos Mountains is a range of hills in the Northern Cape province of South Africa, stretching south-southwest from Kuruman, where the range is known as the Kuruman Hills, to Prieska. (wikipedia.org)
  • David Goldblatt from the University of the Witwatersrand wrote: Companies that mined asbestos in Western Australia and in South Africa were utterly contemptuous of the health of those who took the material out of the ground, those who milled, packed and transported it, those who lived anywhere near these operations, and of the land from which they took it. (wikipedia.org)
  • Partly from inertia, partly for political and strategic reasons, the governments of Western Australia and South Africa were neither diligent in applying available knowledge to making asbestos mining safer, nor energetic in enforcing such regulations as they had. (wikipedia.org)
  • Presence of Asbestos
  • 2 Presence of Asbestos in Talc 2 Abstract This research paper investigates the occurrence of asbestos in talc. (docplayer.net)
  • 3 Presence of Asbestos in Talc 3 The Presence of Asbestos in Talc Talc is one of the softest minerals known to man. (docplayer.net)
  • 4 Presence of Asbestos in Talc 4 largest production of commercial talc (Bateman, 1951). (docplayer.net)
  • The presence of asbestos is connected to the growth of cancers, which include malignant mesothelioma (a cancer which afflicts the pleural lining of your heart, lungs or original site belly), eradicating this really toxic content is critical. (fitnell.com)
  • fibrous form
  • Amphibole crystallization is believed to occur initially as the massive form under conditions of moderate temperature and pressure, with transformation into the fibrous form occurring when the unstable massive form is submitted to rock stresses. (docplayer.net)
  • fibres
  • Asbestos , any of several minerals that readily separate into long, flexible fibres. (britannica.com)
  • Shorter fibres are used in such products as paper, millboard, and asbestos-cement building materials. (britannica.com)
  • Asbestos' brittle, smooth-surfaced fibres are difficult to spin, tending to slip past each other unless blended with a rough-surfaced fibre, such as cotton , which typically makes up 10-25 percent of the blend. (britannica.com)
  • Reports of the harmful effects of asbestos fibres on human health caused increasing concern beginning in the 1970s, however. (britannica.com)
  • Employees in many different industries other than the asbestos mining industry were exposed to asbestos fibres. (hubpages.com)
  • The level of friability determines the amount of asbestos fibres that can be released into the atmosphere and cause health problems when people inhale these fibres. (hubpages.com)
  • Specifically, any waste streams having asbestos (dust and fibres) as constituents are controlled (Item Y36). (wikipedia.org)
  • insulation
  • Asbestos fibre is heat- and chemical-resistant, a flame-retardant, has exceptional insulation properties, absorbs sound, is flexible and has a very high tensile strength. (hubpages.com)
  • Asbestos is found in plumbing, insulation, building materials and many other products. (mesotheliomanews.ga)
  • More than 700,000 schools and buildings in the United States today contain asbestos insulation as reported by the US Environmental Protection Agency. (mesotheliomanews.ga)
  • Risk jobs most affected are miners, factory workers, railroad workers, shipbuilding and construction workers - especially those who install equipment containing asbestos insulation. (mesotheliomanews.ga)
  • Products derived from minerals include asbestos insulation board, ceiling tiles and casings for water service. (mesotheliomanews.ga)
  • For these reasons, asbestos has been widely used in many industries and a variety of building construction materials for insulation and as a fire-retardant. (mesothelioma-cancer.com)
  • Construction companies used asbestos for roofing, fire proofing, sound absorption and insulation. (mesothelioma-cancer.com)
  • Asbestos Control Inc.'s Edward Zalig holds a pile of asbestos cleaned out from pipe insulation in Elk Grove Village, Ill. (howstuffworks.com)
  • In most commercial forms, asbestos looks like attic insulation -- a ball of thick fuzz. (howstuffworks.com)
  • It is found most frequently as a fire retardant in thermal insulation products, asbestos insulating board and ceiling tiles. (wikipedia.org)
  • mineralogy
  • It has been difficult for researchers to assign it a specific definition due to the fact that its meaning varies with the source and purpose of certain asbestos (Mineralogy and Morphology of Amphiboles, 2006). (docplayer.net)
  • carcinogenic
  • and (3) the theory of adsorption of many specific proteins as well as carcinogenic molecules states that asbestos fibers in vivo concentrate proteins or chemicals including the components of cigarette smoke. (docplayer.net)
  • fibre
  • After mining or quarrying, the asbestos fibre is freed by crushing the rock and is then separated from the surrounding material, usually by a blowing process. (britannica.com)
  • By the 1970s Quebec in Canada and the Urals region of the Soviet Union were the major sources of asbestos fibre, and the United States led the world in the manufacture of asbestos products. (britannica.com)
  • Characteristics
  • In optical characteristics, many amphiboles are distinguished by their stronger pleochroism and by the smaller angle of extinction (Z angle c) on the plane of symmetry. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its natural fire-resisting characteristics as well as its insulating properties made it extremely popular and asbestos was used extensively in the building of hospitals, schools and residential homes. (hubpages.com)
  • A particle-by-particle analysis was performed to determine extinction characteristics and the number of EPA -defined asbestos characteristics. (mcri.org)
  • diseases
  • Long after the connections between asbestos and its related diseases were established, some as early as the 1920s, they continued their old methods of production and handling with hardly any change. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1989
  • In 1989 the U.S. government instituted a gradual ban on the manufacture, use, and export of most products made with asbestos. (britannica.com)