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  • South Africa
  • Crocidolite asbestos was mined in South Africa, Bolivia and also at Wittenoom, Western Australia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Asbestos Mountains is a range of hills in the Northern Cape province of South Africa, stretching south-southwest from Kuruman, where the range is known as the Kuruman Hills, to Prieska. (wikipedia.org)
  • David Goldblatt from the University of the Witwatersrand wrote: Companies that mined asbestos in Western Australia and in South Africa were utterly contemptuous of the health of those who took the material out of the ground, those who milled, packed and transported it, those who lived anywhere near these operations, and of the land from which they took it. (wikipedia.org)
  • Partly from inertia, partly for political and strategic reasons, the governments of Western Australia and South Africa were neither diligent in applying available knowledge to making asbestos mining safer, nor energetic in enforcing such regulations as they had. (wikipedia.org)
  • asbestosis
  • According to the WHO it is estimated that 107,000 people die annually from asbestos related diseases such as mesothelioma, asbestosis and asbestos-related lung cancer. (hubpages.com)
  • As many of the scarring-related injury cases have been resolved, asbestos litigation continues to be hard-fought among the litigants, mainly in individually brought cases for terminal cases of asbestosis, mesothelioma, and other cancers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Presence of Asbestos
  • 2 Presence of Asbestos in Talc 2 Abstract This research paper investigates the occurrence of asbestos in talc. (docplayer.net)
  • 3 Presence of Asbestos in Talc 3 The Presence of Asbestos in Talc Talc is one of the softest minerals known to man. (docplayer.net)
  • 4 Presence of Asbestos in Talc 4 largest production of commercial talc (Bateman, 1951). (docplayer.net)
  • The presence of asbestos is connected to the growth of cancers, which include malignant mesothelioma (a cancer which afflicts the pleural lining of your heart, lungs or original site belly), eradicating this really toxic content is critical. (fitnell.com)
  • carcinogen
  • Asbestos has been classified as a known human carcinogen (a substance that causes cancer) by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the EPA, and the International Agency for Research on Cancer ( 2 , 3 , 7 , 8 ). (wordpress.com)
  • Although asbestos is a known carcinogen the United States has as yet not banned asbestos and Canada continues to mine and export asbestos to developing countries. (hubpages.com)
  • These minerals has now been categorized to be a carcinogen to folks. (fitnell.com)
  • But those who might use raw materials of asbestos in everyday life they are also exposed to the carcinogen. (mesotheliomanews.ga)
  • fibres
  • Asbestos , any of several minerals that readily separate into long, flexible fibres. (britannica.com)
  • Shorter fibres are used in such products as paper, millboard, and asbestos-cement building materials. (britannica.com)
  • Asbestos' brittle, smooth-surfaced fibres are difficult to spin, tending to slip past each other unless blended with a rough-surfaced fibre, such as cotton , which typically makes up 10-25 percent of the blend. (britannica.com)
  • Reports of the harmful effects of asbestos fibres on human health caused increasing concern beginning in the 1970s, however. (britannica.com)
  • Employees in many different industries other than the asbestos mining industry were exposed to asbestos fibres. (hubpages.com)
  • Taking into consideration that in the United States alone 10,000 people die each year as a direct result of exposure to the deadly asbestos fibres it is unconceivable why a country would continue the use or mining of this product. (hubpages.com)
  • The best advice to anyone who has been, is, or may in the future be, exposed to asbestos fibres, particularly if the exposure is for a prolonged period of time, is to educate oneself with regards to the prevention of asbestos exposure. (hubpages.com)
  • The level of friability determines the amount of asbestos fibres that can be released into the atmosphere and cause health problems when people inhale these fibres. (hubpages.com)
  • Specifically, any waste streams having asbestos (dust and fibres) as constituents are controlled (Item Y36). (wikipedia.org)
  • mineralogy
  • It has been difficult for researchers to assign it a specific definition due to the fact that its meaning varies with the source and purpose of certain asbestos (Mineralogy and Morphology of Amphiboles, 2006). (docplayer.net)
  • magnesium
  • Metallic ions found in different types of amphiboles include iron , magnesium , calcium , aluminum , and sodium ions. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Pargasite is a rare, magnesium-rich amphibole with essential sodium , usually found in ultramafic rocks. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Amphibole ( /ˈæmfɪboʊl/) is an important group of generally dark-colored, inosilicate minerals, forming prism or needlelike crystals, composed of double chain SiO 4 tetrahedra, linked at the vertices and generally containing ions of iron and/or magnesium in their structures. (wikipedia.org)
  • This kind of talc will appear in the same areas as the original magnesium silicates, both metamorphic minerals, giving cause for leading petrologists to hypothesize that talc arises through metamorphic processes. (docplayer.net)
  • Amphibole forms are distinguished from one another by color and by the amount of calcium, iron, magnesium and sodium contained within them. (heritageresearch.com)
  • diseases
  • Other goals include becoming a united voice for all asbestos victims and educating the public as well as the medical community on asbestos related diseases. (hubpages.com)
  • Higher risk can occur in a worker in an environment associated with asbestos, nevertheless work with minimal exposure can also potentially undergo mesothelioma cancer or other diseases. (mesotheliomanews.ga)
  • Despite the severity of asbestos-related diseases, the material has extremely widespread use in many areas. (wikipedia.org)
  • Long after the connections between asbestos and its related diseases were established, some as early as the 1920s, they continued their old methods of production and handling with hardly any change. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1980s
  • In the 1980s, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) enacted a total ban on American asbestos products. (asbestos.net)
  • Since the 1980s various substitutes for asbestos have been developed for use in many products. (britannica.com)
  • By the 1980s and 1990s, asbestos trade and use were heavily restricted, phased out, or banned outright in an increasing number of countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since asbestos-related disease has been identified by the medical profession in the late 1920s, workers' compensation cases were filed and resolved in secrecy, with a flood of litigation starting in the United States in the 1970s, and culminating in the 1980s and 1990s. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • The latter two are dark green minerals that occur as original constituents of igneous rocks rich in sodium, such as nepheline- syenite and phonolite. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • 4) The characteristics of DMM are as follows: (1) it is associated with repeated asbestos exposure, 5,6) (2) once diagnosed, prognosis is overwhelmingly poor, 7) and (3) it takes 30 to 40 years after the start of asbestos exposure for DMM to occur. (docplayer.net)
  • Amphibole crystallization is believed to occur initially as the massive form under conditions of moderate temperature and pressure, with transformation into the fibrous form occurring when the unstable massive form is submitted to rock stresses. (docplayer.net)
  • fibre
  • After mining or quarrying, the asbestos fibre is freed by crushing the rock and is then separated from the surrounding material, usually by a blowing process. (britannica.com)
  • By the 1970s Quebec in Canada and the Urals region of the Soviet Union were the major sources of asbestos fibre, and the United States led the world in the manufacture of asbestos products. (britannica.com)
  • Asbestos fibre is heat- and chemical-resistant, a flame-retardant, has exceptional insulation properties, absorbs sound, is flexible and has a very high tensile strength. (hubpages.com)
  • Characteristics
  • In optical characteristics, many amphiboles are distinguished by their stronger pleochroism and by the smaller angle of extinction (Z angle c) on the plane of symmetry. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its natural fire-resisting characteristics as well as its insulating properties made it extremely popular and asbestos was used extensively in the building of hospitals, schools and residential homes. (hubpages.com)
  • A particle-by-particle analysis was performed to determine extinction characteristics and the number of EPA -defined asbestos characteristics. (mcri.org)
  • Mesothelioma
  • Studies have shown that exposure to asbestos may increase the risk of lung cancer and mesothelioma (a relatively rare cancer of the thin membranes that line the chest and abdomen ). (wordpress.com)
  • Free Mesothelioma Case Evaluation: If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with mesothelioma after being exposed to large quantities of airborne asbestos, you should contact our law firm immediately . (schmidtandclark.com)
  • The Toxic Tort Litigation Group at our law firm is an experienced team of trial lawyers that focus exclusively on the representation of plaintiffs in asbestos-related mesothelioma lawsuits. (schmidtandclark.com)
  • Linda Reinstein is the widow of Alan Reinstein who died on May 22 2006 after being diagnosed with the asbestos-related mesothelioma. (hubpages.com)
  • Exposure to asbestos particles is one of the main causes of mesothelioma cancer. (mesotheliomanews.ga)
  • In 1964 Dr Christopher Wagner discovered an association between blue asbestos and mesothelioma. (wikipedia.org)
  • insulation
  • Asbestos is found in plumbing, insulation, building materials and many other products. (mesotheliomanews.ga)
  • Risk jobs most affected are miners, factory workers, railroad workers, shipbuilding and construction workers - especially those who install equipment containing asbestos insulation. (mesotheliomanews.ga)
  • It is found most frequently as a fire retardant in thermal insulation products, asbestos insulating board and ceiling tiles. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tremolite
  • Those of metamorphic origin include examples such as those developed in limestones by contact metamorphism (tremolite) and those formed by the alteration of other ferromagnesian minerals (hornblende). (wikipedia.org)
  • Asbestosis
  • There are four main diseases caused by asbestos: mesothelioma (which is always fatal), lung cancer (almost always fatal), asbestosis (not always fatal, but it can be very debilitating) and diffuse pleural thickening (not fatal). (firecoral.co.uk)
  • Prolonged inhalation of asbestos fibers can cause serious and fatal illnesses including lung cancer, mesothelioma, and asbestosis (a type of pneumoconiosis). (wikipedia.org)
  • As many of the scarring-related injury cases have been resolved, asbestos litigation continues to be hard-fought among the litigants, mainly in individually brought cases for terminal cases of asbestosis, mesothelioma, and other cancers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health problems attributed to asbestos include: Asbestosis - A lung disease first found in textile workers, asbestosis is a scarring of the lung tissue resulting from the production of growth factors that stimulate fibroblasts (the scar-producing lung cells) to proliferate and synthesize the scar tissue in response to injury by the inhaled fibers. (wikipedia.org)
  • cement
  • Examples of non-friable ACM include asbestos cement products (flat, profiled and corrugated sheeting used in walls, ceilings and roofs, moulded items such as downpipes) and vinyl floor tiles. (wikidot.com)
  • Asbestos can get into water through various sources like soil or rock erosion, breakdown of roofing materials with asbestos, or corrosion of cement pipes containing asbestos. (simonairquality.com)
  • When asbestos is used for its resistance to fire or heat, the fibers are often mixed with cement or woven into fabric or mats. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common use was corrugated asbestos cement roofing primarily for outbuildings, warehouses and garages. (wikipedia.org)
  • hazardous
  • This judgment is quite relevant for hazardous industries in general and asbestos industry in particular in the 30th year of Bhopal disaster. (asbestosfreeindia.org)
  • In the document, asbestos was categorized as a toxic and hazardous substance which could be replaced by safer alternatives. (asbestosfreeindia.org)
  • Other products include structural fire-proofing, concrete materials and other products previously made before asbestos was found to be hazardous including paints, sealants, drywall, children's toys and joint compounds. (karlenv.com)
  • Asbestos is listed as a category of controlled waste under Annex I of the Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal . (wikipedia.org)
  • Pleural
  • In Turkey / Central Anatolia, there are also natural environmental pollution caused by asbestos, which can lead to increased occurrence of breast cancer (pleural mesothelioma). (mesothelioma--attorney.info)
  • An estimated 1063 cases of benign (non-cancerous) pleural disease - mostly attributable to asbestos - were seen for the first time by occupational and chest physicians who reported to the THOR surveillance schemes in 2008. (firecoral.co.uk)
  • The numbers of cases of pleural thickening and similar disorders reported via occupational and chest physicians under the THOR surveillance scheme under the heading of benign (non-cancerous) pleural disease, nearly all of them attributed to asbestos, are appreciably larger than those for IIDB cases. (firecoral.co.uk)
  • Given that pleural plaques are usually asymptomatic and few of the cases reported to SWORD had other diagnoses of asbestos related disease in addition to plaques, this suggests that many of these cases were identified (via chest x-rays) following referral of individuals to chest physicians for other respiratory conditions - rather than because of the plaques themselves. (firecoral.co.uk)
  • Diffuse pleural thickening Considerable international controversy exists regarding the perceived rights and wrongs associated with litigation on compensation claims related to asbestos exposure and alleged subsequent medical consequences. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mineralogy
  • It has been difficult for researchers to assign it a specific definition due to the fact that its meaning varies with the source and purpose of certain asbestos (Mineralogy and Morphology of Amphiboles, 2006). (docplayer.net)
  • Canada's
  • It is looking more and more likely that Canada's last remaining asbestos operation will never resume. (asbestosfreeindia.org)
  • Canada's dying asbestos industry was dealt another blow Friday from one of its former friends, with Industry Minister Christian Paradis announcing that the federal government will no longer oppose global rules that restrict use and shipment of the substance. (asbestosfreeindia.org)
  • plaintiffs
  • The Toxic Tort Litigation Group at our law firm is an experienced team of trial lawyers that focus exclusively on the representation of plaintiffs in asbestos-related mesothelioma lawsuits. (schmidtandclark.com)
  • Many of the published articles on asbestos litigation focus on transactional costs and ways in which the flow of money from defendants to plaintiffs and their lawyers can be expeditiously and efficiently prioritized and routed. (wikipedia.org)
  • metamorphic
  • This kind of talc will appear in the same areas as the original magnesium silicates, both metamorphic minerals, giving cause for leading petrologists to hypothesize that talc arises through metamorphic processes. (docplayer.net)
  • litigation
  • She represents defendants in toxic tort and product liability cases, including specialty chemicals and asbestos litigation, and works with nationally recognized experts in defending medically complex cases. (docplayer.net)
  • TEXT: [*To members of the asbestos litigation bar, the any exposure theory of causation has become a familiar part of the landscape over the last decade. (docplayer.net)
  • If the answer is yes, the world of asbestos litigation will expand and extend indefinitely because of the ongoing reality of idiopathic mesothelioma, n8 coupled with ubiquitous asbestos exposure in the modern industrialized world. (docplayer.net)
  • Continuing long-term use of asbestos after harmful health effects were known or suspected, and the slow emergence of symptoms decades after exposure ceased, made asbestos litigation the longest, most expensive mass tort in U.S. history and a much lesser legal issue in most other countries involved. (wikipedia.org)
  • Litigation related to asbestos injuries and property damages has been claimed to be the longest-running mass tort in U.S. history. (wikipedia.org)
  • harmful
  • Ellington sued Illinois Central Railroad at U.S. district court in East St. Louis in 2007, claiming it exposed him to harmful asbestos from 1959 to 1979. (asbestosnewsdaily.com)
  • Igneous
  • The latter two are dark green minerals, which occur as original constituents of igneous rocks rich in sodium, such as nepheline-syenite and phonolite. (wikipedia.org)
  • workplace
  • In reliance on this theory, asbestos cases have targeted increasingly de minimis exposure scenarios, including not only minimal workplace exposures, but also 'bystander' and 'take-home' cases where the already miniscule exposures from the product or work activity are reduced even further to near obscurity. (docplayer.net)
  • 1800s
  • The use of the mineral in modern times, however, really started in the 1800s with the Industrial Revolution. (karlenv.com)