• whortleberry
  • The fruits of many species are eaten by humans and some are of commercial importance, including the cranberry, blueberry, bilberry or whortleberry, lingonberry or cowberry, and huckleberry. (wikipedia.org)
  • species
  • A number of the Asian species are more closely related to Agapetes than to other Vaccinium species. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Britain, cranberry may refer to the native species Vaccinium oxycoccos, while in North America, cranberry may refer to Vaccinium macrocarpon. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike large cranberry, this species is rarely cultivated, although some avid berry-pickers brave boggy conditions to harvest its fruits. (newenglandwild.org)
  • Wetland trees which depend upon seasonal or permanent flooding or sufficiently water-logged soils to give them a competitive advantage over other trees, including among others red maple (Acer rubrum), willows (Salix species), black spruce (Picea mariana), swamp white oak (Quercus bicolor), red ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica), American elm (Ulmus americana) and larch (Larix laricina). (ecode360.com)
  • native
  • Vaccinium macrocarpon is native to central and eastern Canada (Ontario to Newfoundland) and the northeastern and north-central United States (Northeast, Great Lakes Region, and Appalachians as far south as North Carolina and Tennessee). (wikipedia.org)
  • Genetic
  • Cranberry is in need of inexpensive high-throughput DNA fingerprinting methods for genetic research and germplasm purity testing for agricultural purposes. (usda.gov)
  • Therefore, the efficient and powerful DNA fingerprinting made possible by the presented molecular marker panels represents an important and applicable resource in the cranberry industry for assessing the purity of grower and licensed propagator cranberry vines, protecting intellectual property rights, assisting grower's in determining genetic purity of existing beds, and for enabling genetic research and analysis of genetic diversity in cultivated, breeding and wild cranberry germplasm. (usda.gov)
  • Several important cranberry cultivars and selections (n=18) and a diploid accession of V. oxycoccos were genotyped with the multiplexing panels and separated through principal component analysis (PCA) to demonstrate their effectiveness for DNA fingerprinting and genetic diversity analysis. (usda.gov)
  • These markers can be used to assess the genetic homogeneity of grower and licensed propagators' cranberry beds, to protect the intellectual property rights of plant breeders, and to enable cranberry researchers to monitor the genetic identity of genotypes within their breeding programs and genetic studies. (usda.gov)
  • markers
  • The panels contained a total of 61 molecular markers which easily separated important commercial cranberry cultivars. (usda.gov)
  • In addition, a subset of these panels were used to genotype (characterize with molecular markers) seedlings extracted from fruits in a cranberry bed planted to the cultivar Stevens. (usda.gov)
  • Therefore, we designed and validated 16-multiplexing panels containing 61 evenly distributed simple sequence (SSR) markers, with non-overlapping allele ranges, throughout the 12 cranberry linkage groups. (usda.gov)
  • A subset of 3 multiplexing panels containing 12 SSR markers was used to genotype 174 seedlings from fruits collected in a commercial cranberry bed of the cultivar Stevens, and identification of intra-cultivar heterogeneity was investigated in the bed to validate the use of the markers in such future applications. (usda.gov)
  • plant
  • The name vaccinium was used in classical Latin for a plant, possibly the bilberry or a hyacinth, and may be derived from the Latin bacca, berry, although its ultimate derivation is obscure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adults like to sip drops of dew clinging to leaves and almost exclusively nectar on their host plant, cranberries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hailing from North America , the cranberry plant found a place within human culture long before its first recorded appearance in the 14th century , when it was used by indigenous peoples as both medicine and food. (herbazest.com)
  • molecular
  • This study developed sixteen molecular marker panels, which can be used for high-throughput DNA fingerprinting in cranberry. (usda.gov)
  • mechanism
  • Although it is not yet definitive, this same mechanism could also explain why cranberry products seem to inhibit Helicobacter pylori , as well as certain oral bacteria . (herbazest.com)
  • Common
  • Cranberries are susceptible to false blossom, a harmful but controllable phytoplasma disease common in the eastern production areas of Massachusetts and New Jersey. (wikipedia.org)
  • usually
  • Males perch on low foliage (usually cranberry) all day from 10:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M. to await females. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the antioxidant benefits of cranberry are usually obtained by consuming it as food, the best way to take full advantage of cranberry's antibacterial benefits is taking it in supplemental forms and herbal preparations, which have a higher concentration of active ingredients. (herbazest.com)