• beetles
  • Xyleborus affinis is one of the most widespread and common ambrosia beetles in the world. (ufl.edu)
  • Like other ambrosia beetles, Xyleborus affinis bores tunnels (called galleries) into the xylem of weakened, cut or injured trees where a symbiotic fungus is farmed for food. (ufl.edu)
  • Although it is among the most widespread and common ambrosia beetles in forested areas around the world, it is often under-reported because it is only weakly attracted to ethanol, the most commonly used lure for ambrosia beetle monitoring (Steininger et al. (ufl.edu)
  • This yellowish to reddish-brown species is similar in appearance to other ambrosia beetles in the genus Xyleborus . (ufl.edu)
  • Typically, ambrosia beetles are considered beneficial because they accelerate the decay of dead trees, which is important for nutrient cycling in healthy forests. (ufl.edu)
  • It is very similar in appearance to other ambrosia beetles (both native and exotic) already found in the U.S. The combination of its blackish coloration, nearly glabrous upper surface, V-shaped and pointed abdominal tip, and abrupt apical declivity distinguishes this species from other ambrosia beetles occurring in Florida (Mayfield and Thomas 2006). (ufl.edu)
  • Two newly emerged (exoskeleton still darkening) adult redbay ambrosia beetles, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff, near a white pupa (bottom right) from which the adult has not yet emerged. (ufl.edu)
  • pest
  • Currently, the redbay ambrosia beetle is an economically important pest in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina. (ufl.edu)