• glucose-alani
  • When this process occur simultaneously, it is known as glucose-alanine cycle. (prezi.com)
  • This pathway is termed the glucose-alanine cycle. (prezi.com)
  • The glucose-alanine cycle occurs in skeletal muscle to eliminate nitrogen while replenishing (renewing) the energy supply for muscle. (prezi.com)
  • Nonessential, being available from dietary sources, it plays a key role in the glucose-alanine cycle between tissues and liver. (abcam.com)
  • The direction of the process is largely controlled by the relative concentration of the substrates and products of the reactions involved.p. 721 In mammals, alanine plays a key role in glucose-alanine cycle between tissues and liver. (wikipedia.org)
  • The glucose-alanine cycle enables pyruvate and glutamate to be removed from the muscle and safely transported to the liver, where glucose is regenerated from pyruvate and then returned to muscle: this moves the energetic burden of gluconeogenesis to the liver instead of the muscle, and all available ATP in the muscle can be devoted to muscle contraction. (wikipedia.org)
  • pyruvate and ammonia
  • The key feature of the cycle is that in 1 molecule, alanine, peripheral tissue exports pyruvate and ammonia to the liver, where the carbon skeleton is recycled and most nitrogen eliminated. (prezi.com)
  • The net result is that pyruvate and ammonia are converted to alanine, consuming one reducing equivalent.p. 721 Because transamination reactions are readily reversible and pyruvate is present in all cells, alanine can be easily formed and thus has close links to metabolic pathways such as glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and the citric acid cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • leucine
  • Other research shows that a specific product containing beta-alanine, creatine monohydrate, arginine , alpha-ketoisocaproate, and leucine (NO-Shotgun) might increase fat-free mass and strength in men participating in resistance training. (webmd.com)
  • Alanine can be synthesized from pyruvate and branched chain amino acids such as valine, leucine, and isoleucine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Protein
  • The methyl side-chain of alanine is non-reactive and is therefore hardly ever directly involved in protein function. (wikipedia.org)
  • In molecular biology, alanine scanning is a technique used to determine the contribution of a specific residue to the stability or function of given protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • liver
  • However, obtaining beta-alanine through these dipeptides is not the only way, as our bodies can synthesize it in the liver from the catabolism of pyrimidine nucleotides which are broken down into uracil and thymine and then metabolized into beta-alanine and B-aminoisobutyrate. (bullshido.net)
  • Also known as Cahill cycle or alanine cycle.A series of reactions in which amino groups from the muscle are transported to the liver. (prezi.com)
  • The alanine then enters the blood stream and is transported to the liver. (prezi.com)
  • Within the liver, alanine is converted back to pyruvate by deamination. (prezi.com)
  • The amino group transported from the muscle to the liver in the form of alanine, is converted to urea in the urea cycle and excreted. (prezi.com)
  • The alanine is passed into the blood and transported to the liver. (abcam.com)
  • residues
  • Another critical application of alanine scanning is to determine the influence of individual residues on structure and activity in the prototypic cyclotide kalata B1. (wikipedia.org)
  • On the structure of cyclotides kalata B1, all 23 non-cysteine residues were successively substituted with alanine. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this study, several Cry4Aa mutants were made by replacing the residues of potential receptor binding site, loops 1, 2, and 3 in domain II with alanine. (wikipedia.org)
  • carnosine
  • The greatest natural dietary sources of beta-alanine are believed to be obtained through ingesting the beta-alanine containing dipeptides: carnosine, anserine and balenine, rather than directly ingesting beta-alanine. (bullshido.net)
  • To understand how beta-alanine works to fight the drop in pH within our muscle, you must first understand how carnosine works. (bullshido.net)
  • β-Alanine is the rate-limiting precursor of carnosine, which is to say carnosine levels are limited by the amount of available β-alanine, not histidine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Supplementation with β-alanine has been shown to increase the concentration of carnosine in muscles, decrease fatigue in athletes and increase total muscular work done. (wikipedia.org)
  • Simply supplementing with carnosine is not as effective as supplementing with β-alanine alone since carnosine, when taken orally, is broken down during digestion to its components, histidine and β-alanine. (wikipedia.org)
  • methyl
  • Alanine is used because of its non-bulky, chemically inert, methyl functional group that nevertheless mimics the secondary structure preferences that many of the other amino acids possess. (wikipedia.org)
  • compounds
  • Because alanine's side-chain cannot be phosphorylated (only compounds like 3-Phosphino-L-alanine and 3-Hydroxyphosphinylalanine are known), it is useful in loss of function experiments with respect to phosphorylation. (wikipedia.org)
  • At least two compounds, 3-Fluoro-D-alanine and D-Cycloserine are known to inhibit this enzyme. (wikipedia.org)
  • Capacity
  • Beta-alanine is used for improving athletic performance and exercise capacity, building lean muscle mass, and improving physical functioning in the elderly. (webmd.com)