• obstructive
  • Disadvantages: Hypoventilation can be a problem with this technique due to any of the following: obstructive airway lesions, decreased pulmonary compliance (e.g., bronchospasm, obesity, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), and/or inability of the surgeon to direct the jet correctly. (apsf.org)
  • Detects strictures or injury to the throat, or obstructive masses in the airway. (wikipedia.org)
  • critically ill
  • Two AARC members share recent stories illustrating just how important it is to keep best practices top of mind when managing the airway in patients who are critically ill. (aarc.org)
  • anesthesia
  • Anesthesia face masks, LMA, and ETT are some of the devices commonly used for airway management. (researchandmarkets.com)
  • The anesthetic may be supplemented with intravenous agents and/or regional anesthesia to the airway. (apsf.org)
  • The global Anesthesia Airway Management Device market is valued at XX million USD in 2016 and is expected to reach XX million USD by the end of 2022, growing at a CAGR of XX% between 2016 and 2022. (reportsnreports.com)
  • This report studies the Anesthesia Airway Management Device development status and future trend in China, focuses on top players in China, also splits Anesthesia Airway Management Device by type and by applications, to fully and deeply research and reveal the market general situation and future forecast. (reportsnreports.com)
  • or where the patient has become unable to protect their own airway even before anesthesia (such as after a traumatic brain injury). (wikipedia.org)
  • tongue
  • Airway obstruction can be caused by the tongue, foreign objects, the tissues of the airway itself, and bodily fluids such as blood and gastric contents (aspiration). (wikipedia.org)
  • Prevention techniques focus on preventing airway obstruction by the tongue and reducing the likelihood of aspiration of stomach contents or blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • It prevents the patients tongue from covering the epiglottis and thereby obstructing the airway. (wikipedia.org)
  • The jaw-thrust maneuver is a first aid and medical procedure used to prevent the tongue from obstructing the upper airways. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the condition progresses, the airway is potentially compromised, due to the spread of infection to involve the floor of the mouth and pharyngeal spaces, resulting in a characteristic hardened induration of these spaces bilaterally and an elevation of the tongue. (wikipedia.org)
  • aspiration
  • A finger sweep can push the foreign body further down the airway, making it harder to remove, or cause aspiration by inducing the person to vomit. (wikipedia.org)
  • If the patient is in danger of pulmonary aspiration, he or she should be placed in the recovery position, or advanced airway management should be used. (wikipedia.org)
  • hypoxia
  • However, the actual risks of this complication occurring compared to the risks of damage from hypoxia if an airway is not used are debatable. (wikipedia.org)
  • secretions
  • He immediately placed her on 100% oxygen concentration, put her back on the ventilator, and suctioned a moderate amount of secretions from her airway. (aarc.org)
  • Suction may be used to clear the airway of blood, saliva, vomit, or other secretions so that a patient may breathe. (wikipedia.org)
  • pulmonary
  • In pulmonary hygiene, suction is used to remove fluids from the airways, to facilitate breathing and prevent growth of microorganisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Breathing
  • In its original form it stands for Airway, Breathing, and Circulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Airway, breathing, and circulation are all vital for life, and each is required, in that order, for the next to be effective. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2010, the American Heart Association and International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation changed the recommended order of CPR interventions for most cases of cardiac arrest to chest compressions, airway, breathing or CAB. (wikipedia.org)
  • As of 2010, the American Heart Association chose to focus CPR on reducing interruptions to compressions, and has changed the order in its guidelines to Circulation, Airway, Breathing (CAB). (wikipedia.org)
  • respiratory
  • Complete airway obstruction is silent but may manifest transiently as retractions of the accessory muscles of respiration (suprasternal, supraclavicular, intercostal, subcostal) or as cyanosis, until frank respiratory arrest supervenes. (uptodate.com)
  • Respiratory therapists are known for their expertise in airway management, and nowhere are those skills more valued than in the ICU. (aarc.org)
  • trauma
  • Depending on the severity of injury, quickness of management and transportation to an appropriate medical facility (called a trauma center) may be necessary to prevent loss of life or limb. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • Enhance your airway management skills and overcome clinical challenges with Benumof and Hagberg's! (worldcat.org)
  • Taking a uniquely case-based approach to clinical airway management, this textbook provides a comprehensive and richly illustrated guide to this vital component of anesthetic practice. (cambridge.org)
  • Written by an international collection of leading experts, Clinical Airway Management is a useful and extensive resource that helps anesthesiologists, emergency physicians, intensivists and trainees navigate the challenges faced every day in clinical practice. (cambridge.org)
  • In conclusion, Clinical Airway Management: An Illustrated Case-Based Approach is a teaching tool with clinical application of airway techniques for many complex airway scenarios. (cambridge.org)
  • chest
  • Interrupting chest compressions to attempt airway intervention in the early stages of OHCA in adults may worsen patient outcomes. (hindawi.com)
  • Chest hyperinflation and positive airway pressure may have a negative impact on hemodynamics during resuscitation and should be avoided. (hindawi.com)
  • open
  • Merely performing a chin lift or jaw thrust can open and/or salvage many airways. (firerescue1.com)
  • thus a primary concern in treatment is ensuring that the airway is open and not threatened so that the patient can breathe. (wikipedia.org)
  • patient
  • The simplest way to determine if the airway is obstructed is by assessing whether the patient is able to speak. (wikipedia.org)
  • This guide serves to assist the anesthesiologist and airway surgeon in their joint decision regarding selection of the most appropriate method for the individual patient and the wavelength of the laser to be used. (apsf.org)
  • techniques
  • This one-of-a-kind resource offers expert, full-color guidance on preintubation and postintubation techniques and protocols, from equipment selection through management of complications. (worldcat.org)
  • resection
  • During apnea, 02 may be insulated while laser resection is performed with no flammable materials in the airway. (apsf.org)