• probabilistic risk asses
  • These techniques are just ways of finding problems and of making plans to cope with failures, as in probabilistic risk assessment. (wikipedia.org)
  • After the Challenger accident, the importance of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and FTA in systems risk and reliability analysis was realized and its use at NASA has begun to grow and now FTA is considered as one of the most important system reliability and safety analysis techniques. (wikipedia.org)
  • hazard
  • Both approaches share the goal of finding causal dependencies between a hazard on system level and failures of individual components. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lack of independence of four hydraulic systems from a single failure event was a zonal hazard. (wikipedia.org)
  • These "system Failure Conditions" and their classification are often previously determined in the functional Hazard analysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1998, the FAA published Order 8040.4, establishing risk management policy including hazard analysis in a range of critical activities beyond aircraft certification, including air traffic control and modernization of the U.S. National Airspace System. (wikipedia.org)
  • pilots
  • Professional unmanned aircraft pilots train to handle failures, including the loss of one or more motors. (aopa.org)
  • While the FAA may change the requirements next year, certificated pilots are required to be in command of each unmanned flight, and also required to keep the aircraft in sight at all times. (aopa.org)
  • He is particularly keen to work with pilots, air traffic controllers, and others involved with manned aviation, hopeful that knowledge will help ease concern about and distrust of unmanned aircraft and their operators that persists among many manned aircraft pilots. (aopa.org)
  • In 2011 Ostafyevo (UUMO) hosted the newly created Aviation Training Center (TC) of Gazpromavia designed for the training of pilots and equipped with modern automatic training systems (ATS) which make it possible for crews to conduct continuous self-training with the use of Internet resources. (gazpromavia.ru)
  • Pilots were able to keep the plane flying for 32 minutes after the mechanical failure before crashing into a mountain. (wikipedia.org)
  • flown
  • The aircraft can be flown under the microlight/ultralight regulations of several countries as well as the USA FAA Light-sport Aircraft rules, Canadian advanced ultralight and the European EASA Permit to Fly rules. (wikipedia.org)
  • These segments are Feeder routes: A route for aircraft to proceed from the en route structure to the IAF, which includes the course and bearing to be flown, the distance, and the minimum altitude. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several aircraft were flown by Air Test and Evaluation Squadron Thirty (VX-30) at Naval Base Ventura County / NAS Point Mugu, California for range clearance and surveillance operations on the NAVAIR Point Mugu Range until 2016, and one S-3 is operated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. (wikipedia.org)
  • The UH-60, first flown in October 1974, was developed as result of the Utility Tactical Transport Aircraft System (UTTAS) program. (globalsecurity.org)
  • type of aircraft
  • Responding to the report, an MoD spokesperson confirmed "a collision avoidance system is being fitted to the Tornado GR4," the type of aircraft involved in the 2012 crash. (rt.com)
  • A320
  • As the aircraft approached the extended centre-line of runway 16R, the aircraft's traffic collision avoidance system (TCAS) provided a traffic alert followed by a resolution advisory (RA) in relation to an Airbus A320 aircraft on approach to parallel runway 16 Left (16L). (atsb.gov.au)
  • Airbus has taken that to the extreme - their first fly-by-wire aircraft, the A320 has eight independently developed software and hardware systems which must agree. (slashdot.org)
  • altitude
  • The batteries keeping navigation, ELUs (emergency lighting units), emergency pressure or oxygen systems running at altitude, and radio equipment operational. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Ramesh Chandra Lahoti Commission, empowered to study the causes, recommended the creation of the "semi-circular rule", to prevent aircraft from flying in opposite directions at the same altitude. (wikipedia.org)
  • descent
  • As the crew commenced descent in response to the RA, the aircraft continued through the extended centreline of runway 16R by about 300 m. (atsb.gov.au)
  • The BRS can be used to lower the entire aircraft to the ground in a controlled descent in the event of major structural failure, incapacitation of the pilot, or engine failure over mountainous terrain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Initial approach segment: This segment provides a method for aligning the aircraft with the intermediate or final approach segment and to permit descent during the alignment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Intermediate approach segment: This segment positions the aircraft for the final descent to the airport. (wikipedia.org)
  • At 11:14:35, after 26 seconds of uncontrolled descent, the aircraft clipped a tree with its right wing and impacted the ice-covered moat of a 19th-century military fortress with the speed of about 380 km/h (238 mph) at a 20-degree down angle, 950 meters away from the runway threshold and 100 meters from a residential area. (wikipedia.org)
  • fault
  • The two most common fault modeling techniques are called failure mode and effects analysis and fault tree analysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • When failure and event probabilities are unknown, qualitative fault trees may be analyzed for minimal cut sets. (wikipedia.org)
  • Independent failures, represented by an AND gate in a fault tree analysis, have a low probability of occurring in the same flight. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diagnostic down time Criticality Fault isolation down time Logistics delay down time Corrective maintenance down time Any failed item that is not corrected will induce operational failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fault isolation down time is required to identify the amount of time spent locating a failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fault tree analysis (FTA) is a top down, deductive failure analysis in which an undesired state of a system is analyzed using Boolean logic to combine a series of lower-level events. (wikipedia.org)
  • In aerospace, the more general term "system Failure Condition" is used for the "undesired state" / Top event of the fault tree. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fault tree analysis (FTA) was originally developed in 1962 at Bell Laboratories by H.A. Watson, under a U.S. Air Force Ballistics Systems Division contract to evaluate the Minuteman I Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) Launch Control System. (wikipedia.org)
  • The use of fault trees has since gained widespread support and is often used as a failure analysis tool by reliability experts. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • A more recent outcome of this work is the Internet, which relies on a backbone of routers that provide the ability to automatically re-routre communication without human intervention when failures occur. (wikipedia.org)
  • Electrical power systems must perform two actions to prevent total system failure when smaller failures occur, such as when a tree falls across a power line. (wikipedia.org)
  • Operational failure is unacceptable in any situation where the following can occur. (wikipedia.org)
  • Boeing
  • On 4 June 2013, a Boeing 737-800 (737) aircraft, registered VH-YIR and operated by Virgin Australia (Virgin), was on a scheduled passenger service from Melbourne, Victoria to Sydney, New South Wales. (atsb.gov.au)
  • The S-3 was retired from front-line fleet service aboard aircraft carriers by the US Navy in January 2009, with its missions being assumed by other platforms such as the P-3C Orion, Sikorsky SH-60 Seahawk, and Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet. (wikipedia.org)
  • Boeing began using FTA for civil aircraft design around 1966. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] In the United States, the last airline to offer pneumatic headphones was Delta Air Lines, which switched to electronic headphones in 2003, despite the fact that all Delta aircraft equipped with in-flight entertainment since the Boeing 767-200 have included jacks for electronic headphones. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the late 1970s and early 1980s, CRT-based projectors began to appear on newer widebody aircraft, such as the Boeing 767. (wikipedia.org)
  • 520: The crash of Japan Airlines Flight 123 on August 12, 1985, is the single-aircraft disaster with the highest number of fatalities: 520 people died on board a Boeing 747. (wikipedia.org)
  • auxiliary powe
  • Cabin air rushed into the unpressurized fuselage cavity, overpressurizing the area and causing failure of the auxiliary power unit (APU) firewall and the supporting structure for the vertical fin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike many tactical jets which required ground service equipment, the S-3 was equipped with an auxiliary power unit (APU) and capable of unassisted starts. (wikipedia.org)
  • structural failure
  • An aviation accident is defined by the Convention on International Civil Aviation Annex 13 as an occurrence associated with the operation of an aircraft, which takes place between the time any person boards the aircraft with the intention of flight until all such persons have disembarked, where a person is fatally or seriously injured, the aircraft sustains damage or structural failure or the aircraft is missing or is completely inaccessible. (wikipedia.org)
  • incidents
  • Berkeley Engineering and Research (BEAR) is a full service forensic engineering firm with extensive experience investigating a wide range of incidents and failures that are central to litigation and insurance claims. (sfbar.org)
  • Some may be exposed to hazards from equipment, chemicals, or toxic materials, but incidents are rare as long as proper procedures are followed. (studentscholarships.org)
  • flight
  • in the rare event of complete engine shutdown, the APU can be used to power critical computer systems and flight controls, as was seen in the US Airways Flight 1549 water landing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, some APUs are connected to a hydraulic pump, allowing crews to operate hydraulic equipment (such as flight controls or flaps) prior to engine start. (wikipedia.org)
  • This function can also be used, on some aircraft, as a backup in flight in case of engine or hydraulic failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • While some APUs may not be startable in flight, ETOPS-compliant APUs must be flight-startable at altitudes up to the aircraft service ceiling. (wikipedia.org)
  • If the APU or its electrical generator is not available, the aircraft cannot be released for ETOPS flight and is forced to take a longer non-ETOPS route. (wikipedia.org)
  • On July 19, 1989, United Airlines Flight 232, a McDonnell Douglas DC-10-10, experienced an uncontained failure of its No. 2 engine stage 1 fan rotor disk assembly. (wikipedia.org)
  • With the loss of all three hydraulic-powered flight control systems, safe landing was impossible. (wikipedia.org)
  • Every factor contributing to a safe flight has a failure rate. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Flight Design CT series is a family of high-wing, tricycle undercarriage, two seat, ultralight and light-sport aircraft produced by Flight Design (Flightdesign Vertrieb) of Germany. (wikipedia.org)
  • An instrument approach, or instrument approach procedure (IAP), is an aviation term for a series of predetermined maneuvers for the orderly transfer of an aircraft under instrument flight conditions from the beginning of the initial approach to a landing or to a point from which a landing may be made visually. (wikipedia.org)
  • New aircraft designs are subjected to years of testing before they are put into service, since failure of key components during flight can be fatal. (studentscholarships.org)
  • it carried automated weapon systems, and was capable of extended missions with in-flight refueling. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the event of dual hydraulic failures, an Emergency Flight Control System (EFCS) permits manual control with greatly increased stick forces and reduced control authority. (wikipedia.org)
  • On its final flight, the aircraft was piloted by Captain Paweł Lipowczan and First Officer Tadeusz Łochocki. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eleven years later in 1932, the first in-flight television called 'media event' was shown on a Western Air Express Fokker F.10 aircraft. (wikipedia.org)
  • The aircraft suffered an explosive decompression from an incorrectly repaired aft pressure bulkhead, which failed in mid flight, destroying most of its vertical stabilizer and severing all of the hydraulic lines, making the 747 virtually uncontrollable. (wikipedia.org)
  • fleet
  • The Ministry of Defense said it was considering the installation of the potentially lifesaving equipment to its Typhoon fleet. (rt.com)
  • The Mod/Service Life Extension Program (SLEP) is RDT&E funding for the SLEP and upgrade of the existing UH-60 aircraft which will extend the life of the fleet, improve lift and range performance, enhance survivability, and provide a digitized utility helicopter platform. (globalsecurity.org)
  • capable
  • I'd prefer to know that systems capable of carrying weapons which can kill hundreds of thousands of people were designed with the same safety in mind. (slashdot.org)
  • Oxygen
  • It also considers failure modes and maintenance errors that could have a cascading effect on systems, such as: Flailing torque shaft Oxygen leak Accumulator burst Fluid leak Rotorburst Loose fastener Bleed air leak Overheated wire Connector keying error Potential problems are identified and tracked for resolution. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aircraft life support systems such as oxygen, heat and pressurization are the first line of defense against most of the hostile aerospace environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • FMEA
  • Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a bottom-up, inductive analytical method which may be performed at either the functional or piece-part level. (wikipedia.org)
  • For functional FMEA, failure modes are identified for each function in a system or equipment item, usually with the help of a functional block diagram. (wikipedia.org)
  • For piece-part FMEA, failure modes are identified for each piece-part component (such as a valve, connector, resistor, or diode). (wikipedia.org)
  • Instead, NASA decided to rely on the use of failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) and other qualitative methods for system safety assessments. (wikipedia.org)
  • carriers
  • Before satellite navigation was available for civilian aviation, the requirement for large land-based navigation aid (NAVAID) facilities generally limited the use of instrument approaches to land-based (i.e. asphalt, gravel, turf, ice) runways (and those on aircraft carriers). (wikipedia.org)
  • In the mid-1960s, the U.S. Navy developed the VSX (Heavier-than-air, Anti-submarine, Experimental) requirement for a replacement for the piston-engined Grumman S-2 Tracker as an anti-submarine aircraft to fly off the Navy's aircraft carriers. (wikipedia.org)
  • pilot
  • A physiological well-being monitoring system especially suited for use by the pilot or other aircrew members of a high-performance aircraft such as a tactical aircraft is disclosed. (google.com)
  • Use of the physiological monitoring signals to generate alarm or assume control of the aircraft is also disclosed along with representative data associated with the sensed pilot physiological well-being indicators. (google.com)
  • The aircraft can seat four crew members, three officers and one enlisted aircrewman, with the pilot and the copilot/tactical coordinator (COTAC) in the front of the cockpit and the tactical coordinator (TACCO) and sensor operator (SENSO) in the back. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first involving a powered aircraft was the crash of a Wright Model A aircraft at Fort Myer, Virginia, in the United States on September 17, 1908, injuring its co-inventor and pilot, Orville Wright, and killing the passenger, Signal Corps Lieutenant Thomas Selfridge. (wikipedia.org)
  • provide
  • Safety engineering is an engineering discipline which assures that engineered systems provide acceptable levels of safety. (wikipedia.org)
  • APUs can provide power through single- or three-phase systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • The primary purpose of an aircraft APU is to provide power to start the main engines. (wikipedia.org)
  • Backup batteries are used in uninterruptible power supplies (UPS), and provide power to the computers they supply for a variable period after a power failure, usually long enough to at least allow the computer to be shut down gracefully. (wikipedia.org)
  • Higher performance aircraft provide more sophisticated life support equipment, such as "G-suits" to help the body resist the adverse effects of acceleration, along with pressure breathing apparatus, or ejection seats or other escape equipment. (wikipedia.org)
  • A newer, more powerful APU could provide full electrical service to the aircraft. (wikipedia.org)
  • The current European trend is to implement bring your own device systems that provide internet connectivity, allowing the user to stream a predefined range of multimedia content. (wikipedia.org)
  • Current UH-60A/L navigation systems do not provide the precision required to insert troops and equipment during future combat (land and over-water) operations especially in darkness and adverse weather conditions. (globalsecurity.org)
  • aircrew
  • These military and civilian specialists are concerned with protecting aircrew and patients who are transported by AirEvac aircraft (helicopters or fixed-wing airplanes). (wikipedia.org)
  • operational
  • Operational availability in systems engineering is a measurement of how long a system has been available to use when compared with how long it should have been available to be used. (wikipedia.org)
  • Capital equipment loss Injury or loss of life Sustained failure to accomplish mission In military acquisition, operational availability is used as one of the Key Performance Parameters in requirements documents, to form the basis for decision support analyses. (wikipedia.org)
  • Electrical
  • Electrical power is also used to run systems for preflight checks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Electrical and electronic engineering technicians help design, develop, test, and manufacture electrical and electronic equipment such as communication equipment, medical monitoring devices, navigational equipment, and computers. (studentscholarships.org)
  • Reports vary, but at least one jet suffered grave electrical failures, tried to fire a missile at something and had something fired at it. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to Klass, the Westinghouse technician at Shahrokhi airbase stated that only the first F-4 reported failing equipment, and that this F-4 was known for equipment failures with a long history of electrical outages, having been repaired only a month before the incident. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bridgstock criticized UFOlogists reports as "not a reliable account of the Iran UFO incident" and summed up Klass' conclusions: Klass found that only one aircraft had suffered electrical malfunctions, not two. (wikipedia.org)
  • system failure
  • but is also used in fields as diverse as risk factor identification relating to social service system failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • If the timing constraints of the system are not met, system failure is said to have occurred. (theragens.com)
  • Safety engineering normally focuses more on preserving life and nature than on cost, and therefore deals only with particularly dangerous system-failure modes. (wikipedia.org)
  • ground
  • There were no technical failures of the aircraft, aircraft tracking systems or ground equipment in relation to this occurrence. (atsb.gov.au)
  • German counter-attacks during the afternoon recaptured most of the lost ground north of the Albert-Bapaume road and more British attacks against Thiepval were costly failures. (wikipedia.org)
  • Galella, an AOPA member, has been in the general aviation business for nearly three decades, and built a New Jersey company from the ground up to sell and repair aircraft. (aopa.org)
  • The deadliest aviation-related disaster of any kind, considering fatalities on both the aircraft and the ground, was the destruction of the World Trade Center in New York City on September 11, 2001. (wikipedia.org)
  • large
  • They are commonly found on large aircraft and naval ships as well as some large land vehicles. (wikipedia.org)
  • During World War II, a number of large American military aircraft were fitted with APUs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Backup batteries range from small single cells to retain clock time and date in computers, up to large battery room facilities that power uninterruptible power supply systems for large data centers. (wikipedia.org)
  • These batteries are often large valve regulated lead-acid batteries in smaller or portable systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • Large air conditioning systems developed electronic controllers, as had microwave ovens and a variety of other appliances. (wikipedia.org)
  • regulations
  • In the UK, for Annex II aircraft, reporting remains voluntary under the new regulations, although this may be reviewed in the future. (aopa.co.uk)
  • engine
  • APUs fitted to extended-range twin-engine operations (ETOPS) aircraft are a critical safety device, as they supply backup electricity and compressed air in place of the dead engine or failed main engine generator. (wikipedia.org)
  • Forces from the engine failure fractured the No. 2 hydraulic system line. (wikipedia.org)
  • Backup batteries in aircraft keep essential instruments and devices running in the event of an engine power failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Lockheed S-3 Viking is a four-seat, twin-engine turbofan-powered jet aircraft that was used by the U.S. Navy to identify and track enemy submarines. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lockheed recognised that it had little recent experience in designing carrier based aircraft, so Ling-Temco-Vought (LTV) was brought into the team, being responsible for the folding wings and tail, the engine nacelles, and the landing gear, which was derived from LTV A-7 Corsair II (nose) and Vought F-8 Crusader (main). (wikipedia.org)
  • If the Common Engine Program was implemented, the service would upgrade the aircraft to the UH-60X standard. (globalsecurity.org)
  • structures
  • Dr. Stevick, CEO has over 25 years of experience in failure analysis and design of structures, consumer products, industrial and medical equipment. (sfbar.org)
  • VRLA batteries are used in the outside plant at locations such as Controlled Environmental Vaults (CEVs), Electronic Equipment Enclosures (EEEs), and huts, and in uncontrolled structures such as cabinets. (wikipedia.org)
  • Civil engineering technicians help civil engineers plan and oversee the construction of highways, buildings, bridges, dams, wastewater treatment systems, and other structures. (studentscholarships.org)
  • components
  • This quantiazation is difficult for software ---a bug exists or not, and the failure models used for hardware components do not apply. (wikipedia.org)
  • The new approach was to build distributed systems that continue to work when components are damaged. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Around this period also the much-used (and also much-debated) military handbook 217 was published by RCA (Radio Corporation of America) and was used for the prediction of failure rates of components. (wikipedia.org)
  • event
  • In FTA, initiating primary events such as component failures, human errors, and external events are traced through Boolean logic gates to an undesired top event such as an aircraft crash or nuclear reactor core melt. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, if any minimal cut set contains a single base event, then the top event may be caused by a single failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • An event tree starts from an undesired initiator (loss of critical supply, component failure etc.) and follows possible further system events through to a series of final consequences. (wikipedia.org)
  • An occurrence means any safety-related event which endangers or which, if not corrected or addressed, could endanger an aircraft, its occupants or any other person. (aopa.co.uk)
  • This analysis method is mainly used in the fields of safety engineering and reliability engineering to understand how systems can fail, to identify the best ways to reduce risk or to determine (or get a feeling for) event rates of a safety accident or a particular system level (functional) failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • prioritize the contributors leading to the top event - Creating the Critical Equipment/Parts/Events lists for different importance measures. (wikipedia.org)
  • service
  • Lincoln Park Aviation remains a factory-authorized service center for Cessna aircraft and an FAA-certified repair station for Cessna, Piper, Cirrus, and Columbia aircraft, though the unmanned aviation side of the business has lately been taking up a growing share of Galella's time and attention. (aopa.org)
  • The aircraft never entered service. (wikipedia.org)
  • Design
  • The complexity of the technical systems such as Improvements of Design and Materials, Planned Inspections, Fool-proof design, and Backup Redundancy decreases risk and increases the cost. (wikipedia.org)
  • Formal design philosophies involving active redundancy are required for critical systems where corrective labor is undesirable or impractical to correct failure during normal operation. (wikipedia.org)
  • ZSA is a method of ensuring that the equipment installations within each zone of an aircraft meet adequate safety standards with respect to design and installation standards, interference between systems, and maintenance errors. (wikipedia.org)
  • They also assist in design work, often using computer-aided design and drafting (CADD) equipment. (studentscholarships.org)
  • During the 1990s the demand for better IFE was a major factor in the design of aircraft cabins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Temperature
  • Zone Map of an Aircraft Aircraft zones differ in usage, pressurization, temperature range, exposure to severe weather and lightning strikes, and the hazards contained such as ignition sources, flammable fluids, flammable vapors, or rotating machines. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition, the text focuses on vapour-liquid and other phase equilibrium calculations, and analyzes chemical reaction equilibria and adiabatic reaction temperature for systems with complete and incomplete conversion of reactants. (google.com)
  • reliability
  • The amount of excess capacity affects overall system reliability by limiting the effects of failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Reliability Analysis Center at Rome Laboratory and its successor organizations now with the Defense Technical Information Center (Reliability Information Analysis Center and now Defense Systems Information Analysis Center, https://www.dsiac.org/) has published documents on FTA and reliability block diagrams since the 1960s. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reliability engineering is a sub-discipline of systems engineering that emphasizes dependability in the lifecycle management of a product. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reliability plays a key role in the cost-effectiveness of systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reliability engineering deals with the estimation, prevention and management of high levels of "lifetime" engineering uncertainty and risks of failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reliability engineering focuses on costs of failure caused by system downtime, cost of spares, repair equipment, personnel, and cost of warranty claims. (wikipedia.org)
  • High reliability (safety factor) levels also result from good engineering and from attention to detail, and almost never from only reactive failure management (using reliability accounting and statistics). (wikipedia.org)
  • In World War II, many reliability issues were due to the inherent unreliability of electronic equipment available at the time, and to fatigue issues. (wikipedia.org)
  • A main application for reliability engineering in the military was for the vacuum tube as used in radar systems and other electronics, for which reliability proved to be very problematic and costly. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1950, the United States Department of Defense formed group called the "Advisory Group on the Reliability of Electronic Equipment" (AGREE) to investigate reliability methods for military equipment. (wikipedia.org)
  • military
  • Last year, an inquiry reported that the lack of a collision warning system on two military aircraft, which collided over the Moray Firth in 2012, directly contributed to the crash. (rt.com)
  • The initial requirement began with military combat systems during World War I. The approach used for survivability was to install thick armor plate to resist gun fire and install multiple guns. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the first military fixed-wing aircraft to use an APU was the British, World War 1, Supermarine Nighthawk, an anti-Zeppelin Night fighter. (wikipedia.org)
  • collect
  • Engineering technicians who work in research and development build or set up equipment, prepare and conduct experiments, collect data, calculate or record results, and help engineers or scientists in other ways, such as making prototype versions of newly designed equipment. (studentscholarships.org)
  • Collect field data and find root causes of failures. (wikipedia.org)
  • control
  • Multiple user systems, which allow several people to share a single computer, are set up and administered by an 'owner' using the Multiple Users control panel. (apple.com)
  • When an aircraft is under radar control, air traffic control (ATC) may replace some or all of these phases of the approach with radar vectors (ICAO radar vectoring is the provision of navigational guidance to aircraft in the form of specific headings, based on the use of radar). (wikipedia.org)
  • Some inspect water and wastewater treatment systems to ensure that pollution control requirements are met. (studentscholarships.org)
  • All control surfaces are actuated by dual hydraulically boosted irreversible systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • monitor and control the safety performance of the complex system (e.g., is a particular aircraft safe to fly when fuel valve x malfunctions? (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • He was more recently one of the first 100 unmanned aircraft operators to secure FAA approval for commercial operation of drones, commonly known as a Section 333 approval in reference to the 2012 federal law that made it possible. (aopa.org)
  • computer
  • Computer programming must recognize the failure and automatically reconfigure to restore operation. (wikipedia.org)
  • You shall be responsible for obtaining and maintaining all telephone, computer hardware and other equipment needed for access to and use of the Services and all charges related thereto. (weatherbug.com)
  • prevent
  • This allows forces to be redistributed across a bridge to prevent failure if a vehicle ruptures a cable. (wikipedia.org)
  • You cannot really find a root cause (needed to effectively prevent failures) by only looking at statistics. (wikipedia.org)
  • single
  • For example, if it takes two generators to power a city, then "N+1" would be three generators to allow a single failure. (wikipedia.org)