• exposures
  • Mean exposures (mean concentration times time spent in a particular microenvironment) in bus commutes were between 50 and 200 times greater than those for the loading/unloading microenvironment, and 20-40 times higher than those for the bus stops, depending on the pollutant. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Lung function decline, chronic bronchitis, and occupational exposures in young adults. (diva-portal.org)
  • California
  • Due to its preexisting standards and particularly severe motor vehicle air pollution problems in the Los Angeles metropolitan area, the U.S. state of California has special dispensation from the federal government to promulgate its own automobile emissions standards. (wikipedia.org)
  • Such states are frequently referred to as "CARB states" in automotive discussions because the regulations are defined by the California Air Resources Board. (wikipedia.org)
  • pollution
  • Air pollution and polluted work conditions may cause some cases of COPD, or make the disease worse. (almondsburysurgery.nhs.uk)
  • This book's problem-and-solution approach enables readers to quickly grasp the fundamentals of air pollution control equipment and essential applications. (worldcat.org)
  • Moreover, the author sets forth solid principles for the design and selection of air pollution control equipment as well as for its efficient operation and maintenance. (worldcat.org)
  • This publication serves both as a textbook for engineering students and as a reference for engineers and technicians who need to ensure that air pollution control equipment operates efficiently and enables their facility to meet all air pollution control standards and regulations. (worldcat.org)
  • Parts II and III are devoted to air and water pollution, respectively, and provide detailed coverage of basic dispersion and control issues as well as more specific topics such as acid rain, the greenhouse effect, and wastewater treatment. (worldcat.org)
  • Air quality regulation must identify the substances and energies which qualify as "pollution" for purposes of further control. (wikipedia.org)
  • While specific labels vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, there is broad consensus among many governments regarding what constitutes air pollution. (wikipedia.org)
  • A broader conception of air pollution may also incorporate noise, light, and radiation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Such standards generally are expressed as levels of specific air pollutants that are deemed acceptable in ambient air, and are most often designed to reduce or eliminate the human health effects of air pollution, although secondary effects such as crop and building damage may also be considered. (wikipedia.org)
  • Carbon
  • For example, the United States Clean Air Act identifies ozone, particulate matter, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and lead (Pb) as "criteria" pollutants requiring nationwide regulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The United States has recently seen controversy over whether carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases should be classified as air pollutants. (wikipedia.org)
  • As an example, the United States Environmental Protection Agency has developed the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) NAAQS set attainment thresholds for sulfur dioxide, particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5), carbon monoxide, ozone, nitrogen oxides NOx, and lead (Pb) in outdoor air throughout the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • limits
  • Emission standards set quantitative limits on the permissible amount of specific air pollutants that may be released from specific sources over specific timeframes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Specific limits may be set by reference to and within the confines of more general air quality standards. (wikipedia.org)
  • Specific sources may be regulated by means of performance standards, meaning numerical limits on the emission of a specific pollutant from that source category. (wikipedia.org)
  • The state installed an air quality monitoring station at DISH, which showed that, as of 2012, air pollutants were generally within government limits. (wikipedia.org)
  • environmental
  • The United States Environmental Protection Agency (responsible for air quality regulation at a national level under the U.S. Clean Air Act, utilizes performance standards under the New Source Performance Standard (NSPS) program. (wikipedia.org)
  • health
  • They are generally designed to achieve air quality standards and to protect human health. (wikipedia.org)
  • In response to concerns about the town's air quality, the Texas Department of State Health Services conducted air quality tests, and in May 2010, released its results for DISH, including tests of blood and urine samples from 28 DISH residents that were tested for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). (wikipedia.org)
  • levels
  • The town spent $15,000 on an air quality test, which found elevated levels of several chemicals including benzene. (wikipedia.org)
  • presence
  • 2-Butoxyethanol usually decomposes in the presence of air within a few days by reacting with oxygen radicals. (wikipedia.org)
  • standards
  • Two sets, or tiers, of emission standards for light-duty vehicles in the United States were defined as a result of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. (wikipedia.org)
  • A distinction may be made between mandatory and aspirational air quality standards. (wikipedia.org)
  • Emission standards are the legal requirements governing air pollutants released into the atmosphere. (wikipedia.org)
  • samples
  • The sampling was done concurrently, taking the urine and alveolar air samples before and after the work shift for 15 workers and the swimming activity for 12 swimmers. (biomedsearch.com)