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  • behavior
  • As a process that influences preferences, decisions, and behavior, affective forecasting is studied by both psychologists and economists, with broad applications. (wikipedia.org)
  • One indication of the rising importance of affective labor, at least in the dominant countries, is the tendency for employers to highlight education, attitude, character, and "prosocial" behavior as the primary skills employees need. (wikipedia.org)
  • Group affective tone is associated with various organizational outcomes such as group prosocial behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • Piety
  • The following excerpt from a work by English writer, Abbot and saint Aelred of Rievaulx is indicative of instructions provided by Christians in the tradition of Affective Piety. (wikipedia.org)
  • Affective piety is most commonly described as a style of highly emotional devotion to the humanity of Jesus, particularly in his infancy and his death, and to the joys and sorrows of the Virgin Mary. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the texts and art of Affective Piety could focus on a variety of subjects, they are particularly noted for their gory and violent depictions of the Passion and Crucifixion, as in Richard Rolle's Meditation on the Passion: Ah, Lord, your sorrow--why was it not my death? (wikipedia.org)
  • Margery Kempe is often used to demonstrate the practice of late-medieval affective piety. (wikipedia.org)
  • Affective piety can be described as a type of highly emotional devotion, focused on the humanity of Jesus, which developed during the High Middle Ages. (wikipedia.org)
  • Practice
  • Affective Meditation is a Christian spiritual practice originating in Medieval Europe by which a pilgrim, worshipper, or other follower of Christ seeks to imagine the sights, sounds, tastes, smells, movement, and tactility of specific scenes from canonical Gospels and their characters, with particular emphasis on empathising with the compassion and suffering of Jesus and the joys and sorrows of the Virgin Mary, leading to the authentic and spontaneous expression of emotion. (wikipedia.org)
  • While affective meditation is a marginal practice, Cooper's books and teachings, and the creative approach to Christian meditative practice that she encouraged, was acknowledged as making an important contribution to the New Age era and movement, characterized by a personal and individualist exploration of various meditative and contemplative traditions outside the boundaries and purview of formal doctrine and religious organizations, including those originating in Christianity, Hinduism, and Buddhism. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is the antithesis of affective criticism, which is the practice of evaluating the effect that a literary work has on its reader or audience. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stimuli
  • Bradley MM, Lang PJ (1999) International affective digitized sounds (IADS): Stimuli, instruction manual and affective ratings (Tech Rep No B-2). (springer.com)
  • This is due to affective stimuli which can have positive, negative, or neutral valence. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, in IBS patients, affective sensation and its correlative brain areas including the ACC, insula, and VMPFC demonstrated heightened fMRI activity in response to painful visceral stimuli, and an inability to down-regulate their activation and modulate the emotional response to pain. (wikipedia.org)
  • theoretical
  • The major challenge for this interdisciplinary domain is to integrate research focusing on the same phenomenon, emotion and similar affective processes, starting from different perspectives, theoretical backgrounds, and levels of analysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • On the theoretical plane, the critical approach denoted as affective fallacy was fundamentally unsound because it denied the iconicity of the literary text. (wikipedia.org)
  • Group members tend to experience similar moods based on several theoretical mechanisms, including the selection and composition of group members, the socialization of group members, and exposure of group members to the same affective events, such as task demands and outcomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Affective events theory: A theoretical discussion of the causes and consequences of affective experiences at work. (wikipedia.org)
  • emotions
  • Arapakis I, Jose JM, Gray PD (2008) Affective feedback: an investigation into the role of emotions in the information seeking process. (springer.com)
  • As a result, one of the first challenges of affective science is to reach consensus on the definition of emotions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Affective forecasting can be divided into four components: predictions about emotional valence (i.e. positive or negative), the specific emotions experienced, their duration, and their intensity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Affective memory requires actors to call on the memory of details from a similar situation (or more recently a situation with similar emotions) and import those feelings to those of their characters. (wikipedia.org)
  • The difference between sentiment analysis and affective analysis is that the latter detects the different emotions instead of identifying only the polarity of the phrase. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another area within affective computing is the design of computational devices proposed to exhibit either innate emotional capabilities or that are capable of convincingly simulating emotions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Affective events theory (AET) is a model developed by organizational psychologists Howard M. Weiss (Georgia Institute of Technology) and Russell Cropanzano (University of Colorado) to explain how emotions and moods influence job performance and job satisfaction. (wikipedia.org)
  • This results in lasting internal (e.g., cognition, emotions, mental states) and external affective reactions exhibited through job performance, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment. (wikipedia.org)
  • The basic idea of the affective disposition theory is used as a way to explain how emotions become part of the entertainment experience. (wikipedia.org)
  • meditation
  • The experience of Affective Meditation is most often precipitated by meditating or concentrating attention on Christian drawings or paintings, music, or literature depicting the experience of Jesus and the Virgin Mary, until the meditator's empathy with the subjects of those depictions becomes sufficiently intense to precipitate emotive expression that may include tears and crying, vocal sounds and prayer, as well as bodily movements. (wikipedia.org)
  • During the late 1970s, psychologist, Yoga teacher, and organist at Culbone Church Joan D'Arcy Cooper, began to explore using the stories told by and about Jesus as spoken scripts with which to lead members of the parish through visualizations and meditations in the tradition of Affective Meditation. (wikipedia.org)
  • In either case, this style of affective meditation asked the "viewer" to engage with the scene as if she or he were physically present and to stir up feelings of love, fear, grief, and/or repentance for sin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Emotion
  • Affective science is the scientific study of emotion or affect. (wikipedia.org)
  • Affective computing (sometimes called artificial emotional intelligence, or emotion AI) is the study and development of systems and devices that can recognize, interpret, process, and simulate human affects. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the origins of the field may be traced as far back as to early philosophical inquiries into emotion, the more modern branch of computer science originated with Rosalind Picard's 1995 paper on affective computing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Various changes in the autonomic nervous system can indirectly alter a person's speech, and affective technologies can leverage this information to recognize emotion. (wikipedia.org)
  • mood
  • Group affective tone is an aggregate of the moods of the individual members of the group and refers to mood at the group level of analysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Analyses suggested that positive group affective tone fully mediated, and negative group affective tone partially mediated, the association between leader mood and group coordination. (wikipedia.org)
  • traditionally
  • While affective forecasting has traditionally drawn the most attention from economists and psychologists, their findings have in turn generated interest from a variety of other fields, including happiness research, law, and health care. (wikipedia.org)
  • neural
  • Neural measures of affective quality of life have been positively correlated with greater left alpha activity in the superior PFC, gray matter volume in multiple prefrontal cortices, spontaneous activity in the right amygdala, and even emotional intelligence. (wikipedia.org)
  • processes
  • Affective design involves designing interfaces to enable human-computer interactions where emotional information is communicated by the user in a natural and comfortable way - the computer processes the emotional information and may adapt or respond to try to improve the interaction in some way. (wikipedia.org)
  • Leaders who are effective at managing the group's affective tone should have more impact on group processes than will their counterparts. (wikipedia.org)
  • illness
  • Recent linkage studies also emphasize the importance of considering genetic heterogeneity in the interpretation of genetic marker studies in affective illness. (springer.com)
  • influential
  • As with many concepts of New Criticism, the concept of the affective fallacy was both controversial and, though widely influential, never accepted wholly by any great number of critics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research
  • This chapter aims to reflect about the importance and challenges of research on the affective dimension in collaborative information seeking (CIS). (springer.com)
  • Second, research on the affective dimension in individual information seeking in general, and CIS in particular is discussed. (springer.com)
  • Affective haptics is the emerging area of research which focuses on the study and design of devices and systems that can elicit, enhance, or influence the emotional state of a human by means of sense of touch. (wikipedia.org)
  • The research field is originated with the Dzmitry Tsetserukou and Alena Neviarouskaya papers on affective haptics and real-time communication system with rich emotional and haptic channels. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other research suggests that accuracy in affective forecasting is greater for positive affect than negative affect, suggesting an overall tendency to overreact to perceived negative events. (wikipedia.org)
  • Even so, past research indicates that a majority of groups possess an affective tone. (wikipedia.org)
  • recognize
  • One can recognize affective labor, for example, in the work of legal assistants, flight attendants, and fast food workers (service with a smile). (wikipedia.org)
  • theory
  • The use of affective memory remains a controversial topic in acting theory. (wikipedia.org)
  • With regard to antihero narratives, researchers such as Sapolsky have suggested that the actual formation process of dispositions may differ from the traditional affective disposition theory formula. (wikipedia.org)
  • moods
  • If the moods of the individual group members are consistent, then group affective tone can be treated as a group property. (wikipedia.org)
  • attempts
  • The most visible institutionalized form of affective labor is perhaps advertising, which typically attempts to make audiences relate to products through particular effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Similarly, affective design attempts to define the subjective emotional relationships between consumers and products and to explore the affective properties that products intend to communicate through their physical attributes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Light
  • In this light, the affective fallacy ran afoul of the New Critics' desire to place literary criticism on a more objective and principled basis. (wikipedia.org)
  • mental
  • In the present phase of affective forecasting, forecasters bring to mind a mental representation of the future event and predict how they will respond emotionally to it. (wikipedia.org)
  • roots
  • The phrase affective labor, seen broadly, has its roots in the Autonomist critiques of the 1970s, in particular those that theorize a dynamic form of capitalism that is able to move away from purely industrial labor. (wikipedia.org)
  • indication
  • The concept of affective fallacy is an answer to the idea of impressionistic criticism, which argues that the reader's response to a poem is the ultimate indication of its value. (wikipedia.org)
  • term
  • The term "affective forecasting" was later coined by psychologists Timothy Wilson and Daniel Gilbert. (wikipedia.org)
  • Affective fallacy is a term from literary criticism used to refer to the supposed error of judging or evaluating a text on the basis of its emotional effects on a reader. (wikipedia.org)