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  • vivo
  • These results represent the first demonstration of adult stem cells with the potential to be differentiated into different types of ECs in vitro and in vivo and provide a useful human model to study arteriovenous specification. (cun.es)
  • vitro
  • These properties can be illustrated with relative ease in vitro, using methods such as clonogenic assays, where the progeny of a single cell is characterized. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, it is known that in vitro cell culture conditions can alter the behavior of cells, proving that a particular subpopulation of cells possesses stem cell properties in vivo is challenging, and so considerable debate exists as to whether some proposed stem cell populations in the adult are indeed stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • It can be induced by modifying the growth medium when stem cells are cultured in vitro or transplanting them to an organ of the body different from the one they were originally isolated from. (wikipedia.org)
  • The word 'niche' can be in reference to the in vivo or in vitro stem-cell microenvironment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other potential uses of embryonic stem cells include investigation of early human development, study of genetic disease and as in vitro systems for toxicology testing. (wikipedia.org)
  • regenerative medicine
  • Stem cell therapy or regenerative medicine uses undifferentiated cells for the treatment of conditions like leukemias. (medindia.net)
  • There also may be important advantages to post-natal stem cells when it comes to autoimmunity, according to Dr. Huard, deputy director of the McGowan Institute of Regenerative Medicine and associate professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry, and Bioengineering at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. (scienceblog.com)
  • This allows embryonic stem cells to be employed as useful tools for both research and regenerative medicine, because they can produce limitless numbers of themselves for continued research or clinical use. (wikipedia.org)
  • populations
  • The early stages of regional specification do not generate functional differentiated cells, but cell populations committed to develop to a specific region or part of the organism. (wikipedia.org)
  • scientists
  • As scientists in the field devise better ways to generate these cells (new techniques are a current area of much research--there have been at least 40 published since 2009), they may become more clinically useful. (conservapedia.com)
  • Toronto scientists are taking stem cells from the eye, using them to generate new cells in a lab and transplanting the new cells into damaged eyes, hoping to improve function, Canada's Edmonton Journal reported Nov. 30. (washingtontimes.com)
  • Scientists have typically believed that adult or post-natal stem cells grow old and die much sooner than embryonic stem cells, but this study demonstrates that is not the case," said Dr. Huard, senior author of the study. (scienceblog.com)
  • My belief is that this study should erase doubts scientists may have had about the potential effectiveness of post-natal stem cells. (scienceblog.com)
  • Scientists had hoped a single stem cell could fix damage to an entire organ, but the findings suggest the power of one cell could be limited, the BBC notes. (newser.com)
  • 7 January Scientists report that, about 800 million years ago, a minor genetic change in a single molecule, called GK-PID, may have allowed organisms to go from a single cell organism to one of many cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • transplants
  • Paralysis/Spinal Cord Injury - After sustaining paralyzing spinal cord injuries, Susan Fajt, Laura Dominguez and Erica Nader of the U.S. are each regaining muscle control and walking with the aid of braces due to stem-cell transplants from their own nasal cavities conducted in Portugal. (freerepublic.com)
  • On October 27, 2014, it was reported that Case Western Reserve University will conduct a preclinical study of PLX-R18 cells in umbilical cord blood transplants for the treatment of blood cancers and genetic diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • The girl had undergone two allogenic stem cell transplants since being admitted in August 2011, both of which failed to improve her condition. (wikipedia.org)
  • cardiac
  • In addition to searching for a cure for DMD, Dr. Huard's laboratory also is researching the use of stem cells to repair injured muscle following sports-related injuries, as well as to treat cardiac, joint and bone injuries. (scienceblog.com)
  • Neocardiogenesis replaces dead cardiac muscle cells with living cells so that both the structure and function of the heart are maintained. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cardiomyocytes (muscle cells of the heart) were thought to be terminally differentiated cells that were irreplaceable and thus required to maintain cardiac function throughout life. (wikipedia.org)
  • The activation of cardiac progenitor cells (a special type of stem cell with long telomeres located in the storage areas of the heart) and circulating stem cells induce cardiomyocytes to proliferate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Quaini F, Cigola E, Lagrasta C, Saccani G, Quaini E, Rossi C, Olivetti G and Anversa P. End-stage cardiac failure in humans is coupled with the induction of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and nuclear mitotic division in ventricular myocytes. (wikipedia.org)
  • He has studied cardiac mutant axolotls, transgenic mice, and induced pluripotent adult stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • He is known for discovering unique and specific ribonucleic acids (RNAs) that have the capacity to promote cardiac myofibrillogenesis in non-muscle cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • proliferation
  • The results show that some adult progenitor cells remain able to respond to signals that drive proliferation and maintain dedifferentiation in embryonic cells. (alzforum.org)
  • Its role in control of stem cell proliferation has now been demonstrated for several cell types including haematopoietic, neural, and mammary stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The niche saves stem cells from depletion, while protecting the host from over-exuberant stem-cell proliferation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Moreover, the minimum probability of double-hit mutant generation corresponds to purely symmetric division of SCs with a large proliferation rate of border stem cells along with a small, but non-zero, proliferation rate of central stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adult stem cells exhibit a minimal[clarification needed] commitment to engraft into the damaged myocardium, they have low survival rates and they have limited proliferation. (wikipedia.org)
  • EMC regulates cell proliferation, formation of organs like the midgut, and wing development. (wikipedia.org)
  • When ID proteins are overexpressed, cell proliferation is enhanced and cells become insensitive to growth factor depletion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Generally, normal development was seen in mice with an ID3 knockout, but they did have a defect in B-cell proliferation. (wikipedia.org)
  • embryo
  • This type of cloning is not intended to produce an offspring, but instead to produce an embryo that has stem cells are made specifically for treating a specific patient's disease. (medindia.net)
  • The embryo s stem cells are then harvested a process that always destroys the embryo. (freerepublic.com)
  • Pope Benedict XVI has reaffirmed his opposition to embryonic stem cell research, saying it's morally wrong to destroy an embryo no matter how beneficial the resulting treatment is. (mdtmag.com)
  • Embryonic stem cells (ES cells) are pluripotent stem cells derived from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst, an early-stage pre-implantation embryo. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, in the neural plate of the embryo this system operates to generate a population of neuronal precursor cells in which NeuroD is highly expressed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Only cells from an embryo at the morula stage or earlier are truly totipotent, meaning that they are able to form all cell types including placental cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Is it just to destroy an embryo cell if it has the potential to cure countless numbers of patients? (wikipedia.org)
  • Political leaders are debating how to regulate and fund research studies that involve the techniques used to remove the embryo cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Originally it was proposed that the MSCs were discarded from the embryo at the end of their life cycle but since the cells remained viable in the amniotic fluid and were able to proliferate in culture this hypothesis was overturned. (wikipedia.org)
  • differentiate
  • Multipotent adult progenitor cells have been shown to differentiate into functional, hepatocyte-like cells. (godandscience.org)
  • Multipotent adult progenitor cells from bone marrow differentiate into functional hepatocyte-like cells, Journal of Clinical Investigation 109: 1291-1302 (2002). (godandscience.org)
  • Stem cells from the bone marrow, which is derived from mesoderm, can differentiate into liver, lung, GI tract and skin, which are derived from endoderm and mesoderm. (wikipedia.org)
  • Within the cancer population of the tumors there are cancer stem cells (CSC) that are tumorigenic cells and are biologically distinct from other subpopulations They have two defining features: their long-term ability to self-renew and their capacity to differentiate into progeny that is non-tumorigenic but still contributes to the growth of the tumor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Essentially this theory proposes that all cells have the ability to be tumorigenic making all tumor cells equipotent with the ability to self-renew or differentiate, leading to tumor heterogeneity while others can differentiate into non-CSCs The cell's potential can be influenced by unpredicted genetic or epigenetic factors, resulting in phenotypically diverse cells in both the tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cells that compose the tumor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, under defined conditions, embryonic stem cells are capable of propagating themselves indefinitely in an undifferentiated state and have the capacity when provided with the appropriate signals to differentiate, presumably via the formation of precursor cells, to almost all mature cell phenotypes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although those cells which expressed the markers were able to differentiate into muscle, adipogenic, osteogenic, nephrogenic, neural and endothelial cells, this did not necessarily occur from a homogenous population of undifferentiated cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therapy
  • Because these CD34+ cells already exist in normal bone marrow, they offer a vast source for potential cell replacement therapy, particularly because they come from a person's own body, eliminating the need to suppress the immune system, which is sometimes required when using adults stem cells derived from other sources," explains Paul Fishman, MD, PhD, professor of neurology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. (eurekalert.org)
  • Cell Therapy for Acute Myocardial Infarction. (wikipedia.org)
  • neural
  • There is much optimism that neural stem cells may help to treat cell losses associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease (see ARF related news story and ARF news story ). (alzforum.org)
  • For example, in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer disease or Parkinson disease, it has been reported that there is limited neural progenitor cells in the diseased brains. (alzforum.org)
  • AS their differentiation into neural and glial cells as well as hepatocyte precursors was observed. (wikipedia.org)
  • placental
  • Pluristem Therapeutics is an Israeli company engaged in the development of human placental adherent stromal cells for commercial use in disease treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pluristem is in the process of clinically testing the use of its PLX (PLacental eXpanded) cells in Phase I, Phase II and Phase III trials. (wikipedia.org)
  • In May 2012, Pluristem reported that its experimental PLacental eXpanded cells were injected into the muscles of a 7-year-old Romanian girl undergoing treatment for bone marrow aplasia disease at the Hadassah Medical Center in Jerusalem. (wikipedia.org)
  • In September 2012 Pluristem reported saving the life of a third bone marrow disease patient using its PLacental eXpanded cell treatment, again at Jerusalem's Hadassah Medical Center and again under the terms of compassionate use. (wikipedia.org)
  • proliferative
  • In different tumor subtypes, cells within the tumor population exhibit functional heterogeneity and tumors are formed from cells with various proliferative and differentiation capacities. (wikipedia.org)
  • The proliferative potential of the two groups was unequal and correlated with the cells' location (central or border). (wikipedia.org)
  • Embryonic stem cell's properties include having a normal karyotype, maintaining high telomerase activity, and exhibiting remarkable long-term proliferative potential. (wikipedia.org)
  • research
  • Debate continues over human embryonic stem cell research, but medical breakthroughs have been made using adult stem cells and other body cells. (washingtontimes.com)
  • Adult bone marrow stem cells have been shown to help repair muscle damage, say two research groups that published animal studies in the December issue of Nature. (washingtontimes.com)
  • Embryonic stem cell research has shown positive results in animals but hasn't produced successful human studies. (washingtontimes.com)
  • Defenders of embryonic stem cell use say progress has been hindered by the Bush administration's policy to limit federal funding of such research to certain existing embryonic stem cell lines. (washingtontimes.com)
  • Such cells have traditionally been thought to be limited in potential--with, for example, gut stem cells giving rise to gut cells and brain stem cells producing only brain cells--although recent research has been challenging that thinking. (medindia.net)
  • She said, "the political arguments that erupted over the last 20 years" over embryonic stem-cell science, "have created great confusion" and "ultimately clouded global awareness of the ethical research" found in adult stem cells. (ncronline.org)
  • Among the dozens of speakers invited to help translate the new developments into layman's terms were Nobel Prize winner John B. Gurdon -- a pioneer of adult stem-cell research -- and Tommy G. Thompson -- former U.S. secretary of Health and Human Services and former governor of Wisconsin. (ncronline.org)
  • In his speech, Thompson admitted he had been a proponent of "limited" embryonic stem-cell research during his tenures at both the federal and state levels. (ncronline.org)
  • Embryonic stem-cell research was born in the state of Wisconsin," at the state university in the 1990s while he was governor, he said. (ncronline.org)
  • Now that that science is better known, he urged other leaders to "follow my lead" and embrace adult stem-cell research not only because it is more effective, but it's also "ethically safe," he said. (ncronline.org)
  • The entire world is closely following the advances in stem cell research, and everyone is interested in the potential of stem cells to treat everything from diabetes to Parkinson's disease. (scienceblog.com)
  • Previous research has found that embryonic stem cells could undergo more than 200 population doublings before the cells began to die. (scienceblog.com)
  • Dr. Deasy, a research assistant professor in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, discovered that a unique population of muscle-derived stem cells was able to undergo more than 200 population doublings, as well. (scienceblog.com)
  • Fortunately, there are alternative sources of stem cells for research that do not require the destruction of human life. (freerepublic.com)
  • Nathan told a congressional subcommittee, 'I am living proof that there are promising and useful alternatives to embryonic stem cell research. (freerepublic.com)
  • Embryonic stem cell research did not save me cord blood research did. (freerepublic.com)
  • Heart Disease - Patients with heart failure experienced a marked improvement after being given injections of their own stem cells, thanks to research at the University of Pittsburgh. (freerepublic.com)
  • He adds, "This research takes us another step in that process by identifying the potential of these adult bone marrow cells, or a subset of them known as CD34+ bone marrow cells, to be 'multipotent,' meaning they could transform and function as the normal cells in several different organs. (eurekalert.org)
  • The stem cell research being conducted now will benefit all of us in the future," said Dr. Sant Antonio. (prweb.com)
  • Added Dr. Sant Antonio, "This is only the beginning of stem cell research in space. (prweb.com)
  • It supports research using adult stem cells. (mdtmag.com)
  • However, the derivation of such cell types from ESs is not without obstacles and hence current research is focused on overcoming these barriers. (wikipedia.org)
  • For many decades, stem cells have played an important role in medical research, beginning in 1868 when Ernst Haeckel first used the phrase to describe the fertilized egg which eventually gestates into an organism. (wikipedia.org)
  • Great levels of success and potential have been realized from research using adult stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • A recent publication in Cancer Research (August 2010) has shown that ID1 can be used to mark Endothelial Progenitor Cells which are critical to tumour growth and angiogenesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • His main research interests concern a study of myofibrillogenesis and heart inductive processes in developing embryonic hearts at the cell and molecular levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • immature cells
  • It was reassuring to see that the abnormal accumulation of progenitors was completely reversible, because when the Oct-4 gene was switched off, the immature cells differentiated, and the mice returned to normal. (alzforum.org)
  • clinical
  • In early 2009, the FDA approved the first human clinical trials using embryonic stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ability of transplanted progenitor cells to improve function within the failing heart has been shown in experimental animal models and in some human clinical trials. (wikipedia.org)
  • The positive effects observed in clinical trials today are a result of the work of donated stem cells that persist in the damaged myocardium for just days to weeks after delivery. (wikipedia.org)
  • genes
  • These cells are activated by a mixture of transcriptional factors, genes, growth factors, receptors, the extracellular matrix and signalling pathways. (wikipedia.org)
  • tumors
  • Mice with Oct-4 targeted to skin got multiple visible skin tumors, due to overgrowth of stem cells in the hair follicle. (alzforum.org)
  • The investigators also found that the CD34+ cells had a limited lifespan and did not produce teratomas, tumors that sometimes form with the use of embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells cultivated from other methods that require some genetic manipulation. (eurekalert.org)
  • Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are cancer cells (found within tumors or hematological cancers) that possess characteristics associated with normal stem cells, specifically the ability to give rise to all cell types found in a particular cancer sample. (wikipedia.org)
  • Such cells are hypothesized to persist in tumors as a distinct population and cause relapse and metastasis by giving rise to new tumors. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cancer stem cell model, also known as the Hierarchical Model proposes that tumors are hierarchically organized (CSCs lying at the apex (Fig. 3). (wikipedia.org)
  • human
  • These cells also have shown promise in treating human heart patients. (washingtontimes.com)
  • Some say these advancements show that adult stem cells and other types of body cells hold more promise for medical treatments then do human embryonic stem cells. (washingtontimes.com)
  • Even aside from the serious moral issues, embryonic stem cells are very far away from helping any human patient," said Richard Doerflinger, deputy director of the Secretariat for Pro-Life Activities at the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. (washingtontimes.com)
  • The assumption that cells derived from iPSCs are totally immune-tolerant has to be re-evaluated before considering human trials," warned lead investigator Yang Xu, a professor of biology at the University of California at San Diego. (medindia.net)
  • However, embryonic stem cells (human or animal) have not cured or treated a single human patient. (freerepublic.com)
  • NASA is hopeful the Human adult stem cell experiments will lead to the reversal of the rapid aging process that zero gravity has on astronauts. (prweb.com)
  • Human embryonic stem cells are often grown in fibroblastic growth factor-2 containing, fetal bovine serum supplemented media. (wikipedia.org)
  • Human ES cells measure approximately 14 μm while mouse ES cells are closer to 8 μm. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many of the debates surrounding human embryonic stem cells concern issues such as what restrictions should be made on studies using these types of cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Much of the criticism has been a result of religious beliefs, and in the most high-profile case, US President George W Bush signed an executive order banning the use of federal funding for any cell lines other than those already in existence, stating at the time, "My position on these issues is shaped by deeply held beliefs," and "I also believe human life is a sacred gift from our creator. (wikipedia.org)
  • Human leukocyte antigen testing has been utilised to confirm that the MSCs stem from the fetus and not from the mother. (wikipedia.org)
  • Presently, the success of adult stem cells in regenerating human myocardium is just a fraction of what it could be. (wikipedia.org)
  • undergo
  • These post-natal cells were able to undergo population doublings while maintaining their ability to regenerate muscle in an animal model, a key finding indicating that they could maintain their treatment potential. (scienceblog.com)
  • In order for a cell to become cancerous it must undergo a significant number of alterations to its DNA sequence. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2001
  • mRNA s of Multiple Cell Lineages, Stem Cells 19: 408-418 (2001). (godandscience.org)
  • Pluristem was founded in 2001 by Shai Meretzki of the Technion, who made use of a stem cell patent which was developed during his Ph.D studies at The Rappaport Faculty Of Medicine, Technion, under the supervision of Dr. Shosh Merchav, together with Professors Dov Zipori and Avinoam Kadouri from the Weizmann Institute of Science. (wikipedia.org)
  • vivo
  • These results represent the first demonstration of adult stem cells with the potential to be differentiated into different types of ECs in vitro and in vivo and provide a useful human model to study arteriovenous specification. (cun.es)
  • umbilical
  • Propofol dose-dependently reduces tumor necrosis factor- α -induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell apoptosis: effects on Bcl-2 and bax expression and nitric oxide generation," Anesthesia and Analgesia , vol. 100, no. 6, pp. 1653-1659, 2005. (hindawi.com)
  • tumor
  • Additionally, our outcomes also claim that TRPC3 shows up as a fresh mediator of breasts cancer tumor cell migration/invasion and represents a potential focus on for a fresh course of anticancer agent. (cancercurehere.com)
  • Within this research, we discovered the functional appearance of TRPC3 in individual MCF-7 breasts cancer tumor cell-mediated Ca2+ entrance. (cancercurehere.com)
  • The donated stem cells may replace the patient's immune system and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Polyamine levels are dramatically elevated in tumor cells compared to normal cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • She discovered that overexpression of ODC and c-Raf activation is sufficient to convert a normal primary keratinocyte into a malignant, invasive tumor cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • This finding is significant with regard to the stem cell origin of skin cancer, since carcinogen-targeted stem cells can remain dormant for many years until recruited to develop into a tumor. (wikipedia.org)
  • She recently developed an animal model to study arsenic-induced skin cancer and to demonstrate that in utero exposure to trace levels of arsenic in drinking water leads to skin tumor formation when the animals mature to young adults. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cardiac arrest Cytokine release syndrome Tumor lysis syndrome, causing acute renal failure Infections Hepatitis B reactivation Other viral infections Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) Immune toxicity, with depletion of B cells in 70% to 80% of lymphoma patients Pulmonary toxicity Bowel obstruction and perforation Two patients with systemic lupus erythematosus died of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) after being treated with rituximab. (wikipedia.org)
  • apex
  • R1 is short, the subcosta ends near the break of the costa (usually incomplete but apical part sometimes visible as a faint line reaching the costa) and near apex of R1;posterior basal wing cell and anal cell are small. (wikipedia.org)
  • protein
  • Hematopoietic progenitor cell antigen CD34 also known as CD34 antigen is a protein that in humans is encoded by the CD34 gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody against the protein CD20, which is primarily found on the surface of immune system B cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • nerve
  • With their unique approach this Neuropathy System infuses the tiny blood vessels that feed the nerves and increases mitochondrial cell function and nutrients to the nerves at the cellular level which revitalizes the nerve(s) that are damaged. (swfhealthandwellness.com)
  • In epilepsy, nerve cells in the brain signal abnormally and cause repeated seizures that can include strange sensations, severe muscle spasms and loss of consciousness. (innovations-report.com)
  • Internal to this peripheral region is the grey matter, which contains the nerve cell bodies arranged in the three grey columns that give the region its butterfly-shape. (wikipedia.org)
  • migration
  • Finally, recent data suggest CD34 may also play a more selective role in chemokine-dependent migration of eosinophils and dendritic cell precursors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regardless of its mode of action, under all circumstances CD34, and its relatives podocalyxin and endoglycan, facilitates cell migration. (wikipedia.org)
  • neurons
  • The roots terminate in dorsal root ganglia, which are composed of the cell bodies of the corresponding neurons. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ventral roots consist of efferent fibers that arise from motor neurons whose cell bodies are found in the ventral (or anterior) gray horns of the spinal cord. (wikipedia.org)
  • Non-proliferative (non-dividing) cells in multicellular eukaryotes generally enter the quiescent G0 state from G1 and may remain quiescent for long periods of time, possibly indefinitely (as is often the case for neurons). (wikipedia.org)
  • increases
  • In this phase, the cell increases its supply of proteins, increases the number of organelles (such as mitochondria, ribosomes), and grows in size. (wikipedia.org)
  • research
  • Research has shown that CD34+ cells are relatively more in men than in women in the reproductive age among Spinal Cord Injury victims. (wikipedia.org)
  • Turek is a recent recipient of National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant for research designed to help infertile men become fathers using stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • He has performed and published research in men's reproductive health issues including genetic infertility, ejaculatory duct obstruction, immunologic infertility, quality of life issues with infertility, testis cancer and stem cell science, and has developed several techniques for evaluating and treating male infertility. (wikipedia.org)
  • metabolism
  • Bone metabolism strongly influences energy metabolism in the body, and metabolism -- what you do with energy from diet -- is the central crux of why some children and adults become obese. (membs.org)
  • found
  • Ilda, who found the Internet impertinent and cell phones intrusive, was of no immediate help. (leitesculinaria.com)
  • A study in the North Sea found that only 4% of adults had a full complement of arms and the rest had damaged, missing or regenerating limbs. (wikipedia.org)
  • The larval food plants are grasses, including cereal crops, the adults are mainly found in open habitats. (wikipedia.org)
  • Later in the year, the immature spiders, which are already showing the reddish median stripe on the abdomen, can be found in small silk cells on plant stems. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adult males are encountered mostly in late spring and early summer while the adult females are mostly found from late spring to the autumn. (wikipedia.org)
  • cellular
  • Polyamines are ubiquitous small molecules involved in many normal cellular functions, including transcribing and translating genes, regulating ion channels and cell-to-cell interactions, and powering cell growth and replication. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cellular senescence is the phenomenon by which normal diploid cells cease to divide. (wikipedia.org)
  • As such, cellular senescence represents a change in "cell state" rather than a cell becoming "aged" as the name confusingly suggests. (wikipedia.org)
  • Consistent with this, telomerase-immortalised cells continued to age (according to the epigenetic clock) without having been treated with any senescence inducers or DNA-damaging agents, re-affirming the independence of the process of epigenetic ageing from telomeres, cellular senescence, and the DNA damage response pathway. (wikipedia.org)
  • distinct
  • Although the various stages of interphase are not usually morphologically distinguishable, each phase of the cell cycle has a distinct set of specialized biochemical processes that prepare the cell for initiation of cell divisions. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cell cycle consists of four distinct phases: G1 phase, S phase (synthesis), G2 phase (collectively known as interphase) and M phase (mitosis). (wikipedia.org)
  • serum
  • Components and strategies Cell lifestyle MCF-7 cells had been grown up in DMEM moderate filled with 10% fetal leg serum and 1% penicillin/streptomycin serum as defined (9). (cancercurehere.com)
  • vascular
  • Conversely, under other circumstances CD34 has been shown to act as molecular "Teflon" and block mast cell, eosinophil and dendritic cell precursor adhesion, and to facilitate opening of vascular lumina. (wikipedia.org)
  • Injection of CD34+ hematopoietic Stem Cells has been clinically applied to treat various diseases including Spinal Cord Injury, Liver Cirrhosis and Peripheral Vascular disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • replication
  • The cell cycle or cell-division cycle is the series of events that take place in a cell leading to its division and duplication of its DNA (DNA replication) to produce two daughter cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The B period extends from the end of cell division to the beginning of DNA replication. (wikipedia.org)
  • The D period refers to the stage between the end of DNA replication and the splitting of the bacterial cell into two daughter cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • mechanism
  • J.-M. Li and A. M. Shah, "Mechanism of endothelial cell NADPH oxidase activation by angiotensin II. (hindawi.com)
  • activation
  • Cells can also be induced to senesce via DNA damage in response to elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS), activation of oncogenes and cell-cell fusion, independent of telomere length. (wikipedia.org)
  • extends
  • The spinal cord is a long, thin, tubular bundle of nervous tissue and support cells that extends from the medulla oblongata in the brainstem to the lumbar region of the vertebral column. (wikipedia.org)
  • response
  • In the United States, it has been FDA-approved for use in combination with methotrexate (MTX) for reducing signs and symptoms in adult patients with moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who have had an inadequate response to one or more anti-TNF-alpha therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phase
  • This phase II trial studies how well tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil works in preventing graft-versus-host disease in patients who have undergone total-body irradiation (TBI) with or without fludarabine phosphate followed by donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant for hematologic cancer. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • M phase is itself composed of two tightly coupled processes: karyokinesis, in which the cell's chromosomes are divided, and cytokinesis, in which the cell's cytoplasm divides forming two daughter cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cells that have temporarily or reversibly stopped dividing are said to have entered a state of quiescence called G0 phase. (wikipedia.org)
  • G0 is a resting phase where the cell has left the cycle and has stopped dividing. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cell cycle starts with this phase. (wikipedia.org)
  • During this phase, the biosynthetic activities of the cell, which are considerably slowed down during M phase, resume at a high rate. (wikipedia.org)
  • In G1 phase, a cell has three options. (wikipedia.org)
  • growth
  • Giving low doses of chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate, and TBI before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • blood cells
  • The cell-division cycle is a vital process by which a single-celled fertilized egg develops into a mature organism, as well as the process by which hair, skin, blood cells, and some internal organs are renewed. (wikipedia.org)
  • early
  • If you reach optimal bone mass early in life, you're less likely to suffer from broken bones or other bone-related problems as an adult. (membs.org)