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  • peers
  • Adolescents with chronic illness or disability experience the same developmental transitions as their peers without disabilities, yet their illness or disability places them at risk for certain psycho-social problems as they move into adulthood. (ncset.org)
  • rather risk is more often related to the degree of fit between the adolescent and his or her environment: family, school, peers, health care services, work, and societal attitude. (ncset.org)
  • Help adolescents find ways to respond if teased by peers. (chkd.org)
  • These adolescents are exposed to the same sexually oriented popular culture and have sexual drives and interests that are undiminished compared to those of their peers. (springer.com)
  • Because membership in a crowd depends on peers' perceptions, crowds in any given peer group will correspond to the local preconceived "types" of adolescents. (wikipedia.org)
  • A person's peers become increasingly significant in adolescence and are especially important for adolescents' healthy psychological development. (wikipedia.org)
  • Peers provide many new behavioral models and feedback that are essential for successful identity formation and for the development of one's sense of self. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most of this first phase of treatment is taken up by coaching the parents toward success in the weight restoration of their offspring, expressing support and empathy toward the adolescent given her dire predicament of entanglement with the illness, and realigning her with her siblings and peers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Realignment with one's siblings or peers means helping the adolescent to form stronger and more age appropriate relationships as opposed to being 'taken up' into a parental relationship. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adolescents tend to spend more time with their peers and have less adult supervision. (wikipedia.org)
  • In his Latency stage, which includes children from 6-12 years old and this is when the adolescents begin to develop relationships among their peers. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2002
  • Although families may be able to adapt, build resilience, and develop greater emotional growth and togetherness as a result of the disability, they may also experience an on-going stress as they move through the life cycles of their own development and that of their child (DeMarie & LeRoux, 2002). (ncset.org)
  • At an early age, the peer group becomes an important part of socialization as supported by a 2002 study titled "Adolescents' Peer Groups and Social Identity" published in the journal Social Development. (wikipedia.org)
  • one's
  • Despite the fact that identity development occurs throughout one's lifetime, adolescence is the first time that individuals begin to think about how our identity may affect our lives . (pearltrees.com)
  • identity crisisDefinition: Role confusion, or an uncertainty about one's place in society and the world.Context: Erikson believed that one'sidentity crisisfirst occurred during adolescence and was the most significant conflict a person would face. (pearltrees.com)
  • Leung
  • Using Age of Opportunity as a starting point Wendy Leung, in the Globe and Mail credits Steinberg as "redefining" how we think about adolescence. (wikipedia.org)
  • Leung notes how Steinberg's study of "neuroplasticity" justifies considering adolescence continuing up until 25 years old, because individuals brains weren't fully formed at that age. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2016
  • Lamm's philosophy for the dolls is that "Lammily represents the idea of being true to yourself in a world that too often convinces us to pursue an unattainable fantasy" and asks future supporters to join him "in promoting the beauty of reality" A boy Lammily doll was crowdfunded in 2016, and a Lammily wheelchair is now in development after a successful kickstarter campaign. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • the most important time for crystallization to occur is during late adolescence, during this time their plans are more realistically related to his or her capabilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, the crystallization of career opportunities is more likely to occur in adolescents given the chance to explore and learn new skills in their job during high school. (wikipedia.org)
  • ossification of the cranial plates does not occur until later in development. (wikipedia.org)
  • chronically
  • Parents of chronically ill adolescents often are more resistant to the adolescent's efforts to act independently. (chkd.org)
  • This finding is paralleled by decreased lymphocyte sensitivity to physiological regulation by the hypothalamic pituitary adrenocortical (HPA) axis in lonely individuals, which together with evidence of increased activity of the HPA axis, suggests the development of glucocorticoid resistance in chronically lonely individuals. (wikipedia.org)
  • cliques
  • Adolescents tend to form various cliques and belong to different crowds based on their activity interests, music and clothing preferences, as well as their cultural or ethnic background. (wikipedia.org)
  • chronic illness
  • Chronic illness happening during adolescence makes adolescent development even harder. (chkd.org)
  • As adolescents with chronic illness learn more about their illness and are encouraged to take responsibility for its management, attempts to make their own decisions about management are common. (chkd.org)
  • It is important for parents and healthcare professionals working with adolescent patients to help the adolescent develop emotionally healthy ways of living with their chronic illness and its management needs. (chkd.org)
  • When an adolescent's chronic illness reaches an unstable state due to not following the treatment recommendations, encourage discussion of what happened rather than scold the adolescent for not following the recommendations. (chkd.org)
  • children
  • The scores of fathers' and mothers' behavioral practices toward their children were obtained for a sample of 911 United States adolescents between 14 and 18 years of age. (frontiersin.org)
  • Life satisfaction, self-concept, and family relations in Chinese adolescents and children. (springer.com)
  • Her works are closely connected with the social-cultural interaction and daily activities of adolescents and children. (wikipedia.org)
  • patterns
  • Daily patterns of communication and contact between Italian early adolescents and their friends. (springer.com)
  • A family meal is typically conducted during this phase, which serves at least two functions: It allows the therapist to observe the family's typical interaction patterns around eating, and it provides the therapist with an opportunity to assist the parents in their endeavor to encourage their adolescent to eat a little more than she was prepared to. (wikipedia.org)
  • Changing
  • While their bodies are changing and growing it's particularly important for teens and older adolescents to maintain a healthy lifestyle that includes a balanced, nutrient-rich diet, with plenty of exercise, and adequate, restful sleep. (helenfarabee.org)
  • parental
  • This chapter examines the existing relationship between different types of parental practices and the development of internalizing and externalizing behavioral problems in adolescence. (intechopen.com)
  • Parental involvement and parenting styles are defined and analyzed as possible parameters of adolescent problems, including bullying and victimization. (intechopen.com)
  • Quite the contrary, the therapist will work hard to address any parental criticism or hostility toward the adolescent. (wikipedia.org)
  • behaviors
  • Highlighting the outsized scientific and clinical benefits of prediction in developmental populations including adolescence, we show that predictive brain-based models are already providing new insights on adolescent-specific risk-related behaviors. (deepdyve.com)
  • These norms encourage adolescents to interact with some people while avoiding others and reward certain behaviors while discouraging others, a process of normative social influence. (wikipedia.org)
  • Throughout, the role of the therapist is to model to the parents an uncritical stance toward the adolescent - the Maudsley Approach adheres to the tenet that the adolescent is not to blame for the challenging eating disorder behaviors, but rather that these symptoms are mostly outside of the adolescent's control (externalizing the illness). (wikipedia.org)
  • period
  • During adolescence, most growth in height generally occurs during one, single growth period, or "growth spurt. (helenfarabee.org)
  • Most teens also struggle with acne blemishes at some point during their adolescent period. (helenfarabee.org)
  • One notable change during the adolescent period is the increase in the prevalence of externalizing and internalizing problems [ 1 ]. (intechopen.com)
  • This is principally because the primordium of the cranium during the period of fetal brain development is not yet ossified (hardened into bone through calcification). (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • This study aimed to determine whether there is any grade or gender effect on adolescents' academic self-concept in the Singapore context. (springer.com)
  • AVI 233 - Air Transportation (3) The study of the air transportation industry from development to present day. (dbq.edu)
  • The study showed the importance of the twelfth grade year because crystallization increased with age, therefore this year should be used for career and academic development. (wikipedia.org)
  • A study was done by the University of Minnesota to determine whether working during high school helped form adolescents' choices in crystallization of occupations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cultural
  • Identity and bi-cultural development. (pearltrees.com)
  • This course will focus on how a work of art reflects and is affected by the major cultural, political, and religious developments of its era. (dbq.edu)
  • In J. Lompscher (Ed.), Entwicklung und lernen aus kulturhistorischer Sicht [Development and learning from a cultural-historical point of view] (pp. 81-93). (wikipedia.org)
  • Teens
  • For families who have teens with disabilities, adolescence can be especially challenging. (ncset.org)
  • In spite of this, teens with disabilities want and need to experience and obtain the same things that all adolescents want and need no matter how significant their disability. (ncset.org)
  • Adolescence, alone, is a stressful developmental process even for physically healthy teens. (chkd.org)
  • stages
  • This development contains five stages of ethnic perspective-taking ability, including (1) physicalistic and observable perspective, (2) literal perspective, (3) non-literal and social perspective, (4) group perspective and (5) multicultural perspective of ethnicity. (wikipedia.org)
  • childhood
  • These adolescents are considered unpopular or deviant even early in childhood, and are rejected as such. (wikipedia.org)
  • This type of unpopularity can also result in psychological harm to the rejected child and give them an "increased risk of depression and uncontrolled anger over the years of middle childhood" To understand the stability of peer rejection, it is first necessary to trace unpopularity back to the original interactions between future antisocial adolescents and their popular peers. (wikipedia.org)
  • These skills are built upon, improved and better controlled throughout early childhood, and continue in refinement throughout most of the individual's years of development into adulthood. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children are more likely to be attached to their father during their late childhood to early adolescence. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the critical period for the visual cortex ends in early childhood, other cortical areas and abilities have a critical period that lasts up through maturity (age 16), the same time frame for the development of fluid intelligence. (wikipedia.org)
  • It starts off where the previous film Pather Panchali (1955) ended, with Apu's family moving to Varanasi, and chronicles Apu's life from childhood to adolescence in college, right up to his mother's death, when he is left all alone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lack
  • In adolescence, they are uncharacteristic of any crowd and lack the close friendships of their more popular peers. (wikipedia.org)
  • In seeking to compensate for the lack of peer relations, furthermore, the unpopular adolescent may be forced to turn to other sources of support that cannot replace the peer group and may, in fact, encourage the adolescent's unpopular traits. (wikipedia.org)
  • adult
  • Gender differences in adult spatial information processing: Their relationship to pubertal timing, adolescent activities, and sex-typing of personality. (springer.com)
  • This is because fathers who have a secure attachment style in adult relationships tend to have lower levels of parenting stress, lower levels of abuse potential, and a greater amount of knowledge about child development. (wikipedia.org)
  • young
  • The present study used meta-analytic techniques to compare the effect size ( d ) of the gender difference in 14 studies published from 1975 to 1992 which administered the Mental Rotations test to adolescents and young adults. (springer.com)
  • A recent study of adolescent girls in detention performed by Crystal L. Schrum, M.A. and Randall T. Salekin, Ph.D. of the University of Alabama and reported in Behavioral Sciences and the Law, revealed the core qualities that best described young female sociopaths. (sociopathworld.com)
  • social
  • But while normal peer relations are an enjoyable alternative to the home, a subset of adolescents experiences this social network as distinctly unpleasant. (wikipedia.org)
  • This intervention was developed by researchers at the Oregon Social Learning Center http://www.oslc.org/ in 1991, in response to the increasing rates of juvenile delinquency in their community and the high rates of violent crime committed by adolescents and teens. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sociometrics Corporation is a for-profit research and development firm in Los Altos, CA specializing in social science research applications. (wikipedia.org)
  • conduct problems
  • Understanding changes in DNA methylation, an epigenetic process that regulates how genes are 'switched on and off', could aid the development of more effective approaches to preventing later conduct problems. (kcl.ac.uk)
  • The goal of the LIFT program is to prevent the development of conduct problems, such as oppositional defiant disorder oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder conduct disorder, by lowering the probability of antisocial behavior and increasing prosocial behavior within school, home, and community settings. (wikipedia.org)
  • experiences
  • Feelings of uniqueness may stem from fascination with one's own thoughts to the point where an adolescent believes that his thoughts or experiences are completely novel and unique when compared to the thoughts or experiences of others. (wikipedia.org)
  • while at the same time, this adolescent might believe that he is the only person who can possibly experience whatever feelings he might be experiencing at that particular time and that these experiences are unique to him. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research on racial identity development emerged from the experiences of African Americans during the civil rights movement, however expanded over time to include the experiences of other racial groups. (wikipedia.org)
  • role
  • No single cause accounts for SCFEs, as several factors play a role in the development of a SCFE, particularly mechanical and endocrine (hormone-related) factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • The almost exclusive incidence of SCFE during the adolescent growth spurt indicates a hormonal role. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, he believed that the father begins to play an important role in development when the child enters the phallic stage of development, which generally occurs approximately at the age of three. (wikipedia.org)
  • health
  • Apajasalo M, Rautonen J, Holmberg C et al (1996) Quality of life in pre-adolescence: a 17-dimensional health-related measure (17D). (esicm.org)
  • Setting Child and adolescent mental health services in two London National Health Service Trusts. (ebscohost.com)
  • The Program Archive on Sexuality, Health, and Adolescence (PASHA), funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the Office of Adolescent Health in the Department of Health and Human Services, is a collection of effective program replication kits designed to reduce teen pregnancy and STI/HIV/AIDS in adolescents. (wikipedia.org)
  • research
  • Although the construct itself remains widely used in research today, there has been no supporting evidence to suggest that adolescent egocentrism follows any age related pattern (as would be suggested by the assumption that it disappears when adolescents enter the formal operational stage, which in fact some individuals never reach). (wikipedia.org)
  • Other research has focused on identifying stable subgroups of unpopular adolescents. (wikipedia.org)
  • especially
  • It is important to note that given the vastly different histories of various racial groups, particularly in the United States, that ethnic and racial identity development looks very different between different groups, especially when looking at minority (e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • begins
  • It is at the onset of adolescence that the individual is "freed" from the confines of concrete thought, and begins to be able to grasp abstract or hypothetical concepts (thus the formal operational way of thinking arises). (wikipedia.org)
  • The resolution of this stage of development occurs when the child, usually at the age of six, renounces their desire for their opposite-sex parent and begins to identify with their same-sex parent. (wikipedia.org)
  • Development of ethnic identity begins during adolescence but is described as a process of the construction of identity over time due to a combination of experience and actions of the individual and includes gaining knowledge and understanding of in-group(s), as well as a sense of belonging to (an) ethnic group(s). (wikipedia.org)
  • personal
  • Since an adolescent is thought to develop the formal operational stage of thinking during this time, the personal fable phenomenon is thought to develop as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • The collective identity framework has been related to ethnic identity development, particularly in recognizing the importance of personal identification of ethnicity through categorical membership. (wikipedia.org)
  • time
  • This is also the time frame for development of what is defined in psychometric studies as the general factor of intelligence, or g, as measured by IQ tests. (wikipedia.org)
  • The capacity of the brain to adapt its connections to environmental stimuli diminishes over time, and therefore it would follow that there is a critical period for intellectual development as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • evidence
  • The genes that currently have evidence to be associated with CMM disorder include DCC (deleted in colorectal carcinoma), DNAL4 (dynein axonemal light chain 4), and RAD51 (recombination protein A). DCC encodes a receptor for NTN1 (netrin-1), a protein thought to be responsible for axon guidance and neuronal cell migration during development. (wikipedia.org)
  • great
  • Pinaki Sen Gupta as Apurba "Apu" Roy (boy) Smaran Ghosal as Apu (adolescent) Kanu Banerjee as Harihar Roy, Apu's father Karuna Banerjee as Sarbajaya Roy, Apu's mother Ramani Ranjan Sen as Bhabataran, Sarbajaya's uncle and Apu's great uncle Charu Prakash Ghosh as Nanda Babu Subodh Ganguly as Headmaster Aparajito was based on the last fifth of the novel Pather Panchali and the first third of the novel Aparajito by Banerjee. (wikipedia.org)
  • identity
  • Indeed, unpopular adolescents may be unable to achieve a genuine sense either of identity or intimacy either in their initial peer relations, or in their attempted compensation involving family members, antisocial contacts, or fantasy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Relatedly, collective identity is an overarching framework for different types of identity development, emphasizing the multidimensionality of group membership. (wikipedia.org)