• tubules
  • The urine thus formed passes through the network of tubules and tubes to collect into the renal calyx that sends it along to the ureters. (news-medical.net)
  • Interstitial nephritis (or tubulo-interstitial nephritis) is a form of nephritis affecting the interstitium of the kidneys surrounding the tubules, i.e., is inflammation of the spaces between renal tubules. (wikipedia.org)
  • This form of nephropathy is "chronic analgesic nephritis," a chronic inflammatory change characterized by loss and atrophy of tubules and interstitial fibrosis and inflammation (BRS Pathology, 2nd edition). (wikipedia.org)
  • As reflected in their cylindrical form, casts are generated in the small distal convoluted tubules and collecting ducts of the kidney, and generally maintain their shape and composition as they pass through the urinary system. (wikipedia.org)
  • tubule
  • Affected cells of the proximal tubule may be passed in the urine, but a kidney biopsy is the only sure way to make a diagnosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • They form via precipitation of Tamm-Horsfall mucoprotein which is secreted by renal tubule cells, and sometimes also by albumin in conditions of proteinuria. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cephaloridine is, however, highly cytotoxic to the proximal renal tubule, the segment of the nephron responsible for the secretion of organic anions, including para-am-minohippurate (PAH), as well as the various penicillin and cephalosporin antibiotics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fluid
  • There would have to watch out for the patient's fluid intake because too much fluid may result to the further weakening of the kidneys. (skinsheen.com)
  • Additional possible cause of nephropathy is due to the formation of cysts or pockets containing fluid within the kidneys. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hypertension
  • For instance, it has been shown that protein released by the kidneys in diabetes mellitus sensitises the kidney to the damaging effects of hypertension. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chronic conditions that can produce nephropathy include systemic lupus erythematosus, diabetes mellitus and high blood pressure (hypertension), which lead to diabetic nephropathy and hypertensive nephropathy, respectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • GAVE is associated with a number of conditions, including portal hypertension, chronic kidney failure, and collagen vascular diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Intervention
  • Identifies and discusses all levels of nursing management, including Health Promotion, Acute Intervention, and Ambulatory and Home Care, to prepare the nurse to effectively intervene at various stages of illness. (ecampus.com)
  • Mortality
  • Specifically, his work involves identifying reliable and practical tests for protein-caloric malnutrition, which is associated with heightened risks of mortality in renal failure patients, and using these tests to assess different treatment strategies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mortality after acute renal failure: models for prognostic stratification and risk adjustment. (wikipedia.org)
  • slowly
  • My Dr seems to think that I am stable but my levels are not normal and I am afraid to death that the nightmare of hep C and cancer or kidney failure is slowly becoming a reality. (medhelp.org)
  • uremia
  • Acute kidney failure results in reduced output of urine , rapidly and abnormally increased levels of nitrogenous substances, potassium , sulfates, and phosphates in the blood , and abnormally low blood levels of sodium, calcium, and carbon dioxide ( see uremia ). (britannica.com)
  • Both uremia and the uremic syndrome have been used interchangeably to denote a very high plasma urea concentration that is the result of renal failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • A detailed and accurate history and physical will help determine if uremia is acute or chronic. (wikipedia.org)
  • fail
  • As the kidneys fail to excrete the wastes from the blood adequately, they tend to accumulate in the body. (news-medical.net)
  • When kidneys fail to filter properly, waste accumulates in the blood and the body, a condition called azotemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the kidneys fail, they produce less erythropoietin, resulting in decreased production of red blood cells to replace the natural breakdown of old red blood cells. (wikipedia.org)