• vaccine
  • Another reason someone might contract the flu even after receiving vaccination is if the strain they were infected with wasn't included in the vaccine in the first place. (businessinsider.com)
  • If no urgent need arises and the woman has previously received tetanus vaccine, Td vaccination should be delayed until the postpartum period. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is recommended for pregnant women who have never received tetanus vaccine (i.e., have never received DTP, DTaP or DT as child or Td or TT as adult) to receive a series of three Td vaccinations starting during pregnancy to ensure protection against maternal and neonatal tetanus. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the vaccine is rehydrated by adding the diluent as directed the resulting single product is recommended for the vaccination of healthy cattle as an aid in prevention of disease due to Bovine Virus Diarrhea virus. (drugs.com)
  • Vaccination of 1-7 days old broilers with live attenuated ND vaccine provides significant protection against field vNDV, despite the presence of MDA. (jscimedcentral.com)
  • Active immunity is possible with a series of 2 or 3 injections, and can be given in combination with hepatitis A vaccine. (mydr.com.au)
  • If travelling overseas, remember that it takes at least 2 weeks to develop immunity after a vaccine, and some vaccines need more than one dose, several weeks apart. (mydr.com.au)
  • The vaccine contains attenuated antigens to stimulate active immunity in dogs against canine distemper virus, canine parvovirus, infectious canine hepatitis caused by canine adenovirus 1 and respiratory disease caused by canine adenovirus type 2. (viovet.co.uk)
  • Show your opposition to forced vaccinations and support the cause of Vaccine Impact , part of the Health Impact News network . (healthimpactnews.com)
  • 1 Ongoing vaccine development and vaccination recommendations have enabled people to live healthier lives. (uspharmacist.com)
  • Among the reasons surveyed adults offered for not getting vaccinations were concerns about vaccine safety or efficacy, being too busy to get shots, lack of awareness about which diseases are vaccine-preventable, not being worried about contracting a VPD, and expense. (uspharmacist.com)
  • Currently, Mexican children receive inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) in their primary vaccination series. (stanford.edu)
  • Immunization (vaccination) can be discrete as active immunity formed by vaccine. (omicsonline.org)
  • The subsequent vaccine organism retains the ability to duplicate and produce immunity , but generally does not cause illness. (omicsonline.org)
  • A vaccine is an antigenic preparation used to produce active immunity to a disease, in order to prevent or reduce the effects of infection by any natural or "wild" pathogen. (wikipedia.org)
  • For instance, yellow fever vaccination is on the routine vaccine schedule of French Guiana, is recommended in certain regions of Brazil but in the United States is only given to travelers heading to countries with a history of the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • The use of combination vaccine products means that, as of 2013[update], the United Kingdom's immunization program consists of 9 injections by the age of two, rather than 22 if vaccination for each disease was given as a separate injection. (wikipedia.org)
  • Agrewala has been involved in clinical investigations such as the Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research-sponsored project, Novel Vaccine Delivery Systems that Elicit Robust and Enduring T Cell Memory Responses: Alternatives to BCG Vaccination in Tuberculosis Endemic Regions Grant, under the aegis of Australia-India Strategic Research Fund (AISRF) during 2012-16. (wikipedia.org)
  • A vaccine is a biological preparation that provides active acquired immunity to a particular disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • The terms vaccine and vaccination are derived from Variolae vaccinae (smallpox of the cow), the term devised by Edward Jenner to denote cowpox. (wikipedia.org)
  • The efficacy or performance of the vaccine is dependent on a number of factors: the disease itself (for some diseases vaccination performs better than for others) the strain of vaccine (some vaccines are specific to, or at least most effective against, particular strains of the disease) whether the vaccination schedule has been properly observed. (wikipedia.org)
  • The following are important considerations in the effectiveness of a vaccination program:[citation needed] careful modeling to anticipate the impact that an immunization campaign will have on the epidemiology of the disease in the medium to long term ongoing surveillance for the relevant disease following introduction of a new vaccine maintenance of high immunization rates, even when a disease has become rare. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vaccines are typically imperfect as some individuals' immune systems may not generate an adequate immune response to vaccines to confer long-term immunity, so a portion of those who are vaccinated may lack immunity.Lastly, vaccine contraindications may prevent certain individuals from becoming immune. (wikipedia.org)
  • vaccines
  • They also study disease-causing organisms to determine how they injure the host and help to develop vaccines (see vaccination ). (encyclopedia.com)
  • Proper vaccination using quality live and inactivated vaccines may significantly reduce incidence and severity of outbreaks of New castle disease (ND), a highly contagious disease of poultry. (jscimedcentral.com)
  • After administration with one of the leptospirosis vaccines, a mild and transient increase in body temperature (≤ 1 °C) may occur for a few days after vaccination, with some pups showing less activity and/or a reduced appetite. (viovet.co.uk)
  • The CDC states that "The vaccines cannot harm them and they will develop active immunity. (healthimpactnews.com)
  • Over the past two decades, the recommended vaccination schedule has grown rapidly and become more complicated as many new vaccines have been developed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sample vaccination schedules discussed by the World Health Organization show a developed country using a schedule which extends over the first five years of a child's life and uses vaccines which cost over $700 including administration costs while a developing country uses a schedule providing vaccines in the first 9 months of life and costing only $25. (wikipedia.org)
  • The World Health Organization monitors vaccination schedules across the world, noting what vaccines are included in each country's program, the coverage rates achieved and various auditing measures. (wikipedia.org)
  • The administration of vaccines is called vaccination. (wikipedia.org)
  • Individuals who are immunodeficient due to HIV/AIDS, lymphoma, leukemia, bone marrow cancer, an impaired spleen, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy may have lost any immunity that they previously had and vaccines may not be of any use for them because of their immunodeficiency. (wikipedia.org)
  • social immunity
  • Social immunity (also termed collective immunity) describes the additional level of disease protection arising in social groups from collective disease defences, performed either jointly or towards one another. (wikipedia.org)
  • Social immunity is a recently developed concept used to describe the evolution of an additional level of immunity in the colonies of eusocial insects (some bees and wasps, all ants and termites). (wikipedia.org)
  • Social immunity provides an integrated approach for the study of disease dynamics in societies, combining both the behaviour and physiology (including molecular-level processes) of all group members and their social interactions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Social immunity differs from similar phenomena that can occur in groups that are not truly social (e.g. herding animals). (wikipedia.org)
  • Further, although social immunity can be achieved through behavioural, physiological or organisational defences, these components are not mutually exclusive and often overlap. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hence, social immunity has evolved to reduce and mitigate this risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • smallpox
  • The first clinical description of immunity which arose from a specific disease causing organism is probably Kitab fi al-jadari wa-al-hasbah ('A Treatise on Smallpox and Measles', translated 1848) written by the Islamic physician Al-Razi in the 9th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • Variolation had the disadvantage that the inoculating agent used was still an active form of smallpox and, although less potent, could still kill the inoculee or spread in its full form to others nearby. (wikipedia.org)
  • pathogen
  • Adaptive (or acquired) immunity creates immunological memory after an initial response to a specific pathogen, leading to an enhanced response to subsequent encounters with that same pathogen. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • It is hoped that further understanding of the molecular basis of immunity will translate to improved clinical practice in the future. (wikipedia.org)
  • organism
  • this happens by being exposed to a disease causing organism, either by catching it in the normal way or through vaccination with a dose of the responsible virus or bacteria which has been killed or inactivated. (mydr.com.au)
  • Immunology
  • immunology, branch of medicine that studies the response of organisms to foreign substances, e.g., viruses , bacteria , and bacterial toxins (see immunity ). (encyclopedia.com)
  • protection
  • These collective defences complement the individual immunity of all group members and constitute an extra layer of protection at the group level, combining behavioural, physiological and organisational adaptations. (wikipedia.org)
  • infants
  • According to the CDC, vaccination of preterm infants is a perfectly safe medical practice. (healthimpactnews.com)
  • After all, the CDC acknowledges that vaccination carries risks of adverse events in children born full-term, so how can it possibly be true that vaccination "cannot harm" infants born prematurely? (healthimpactnews.com)
  • Moreover, if we assume the CDC means to say that vaccination of premature infants does not place them at any greater risk, in the above video ( presented by the team that made the documentary film Vaxxed ), Suzanne Humphries, MD, shares research exposing what a dangerous lie this still would be. (healthimpactnews.com)