• gels
  • Immobilized pH gradient (IPG) gels are the acrylamide gel matrix co-polymerized with the pH gradient, which result in completely stable gradients except the most alkaline (>12) pH values. (wikipedia.org)
  • A high reproducibility in gel pore size and a high-yield electroelution of proteins performed by this highly reliable technique strongly correlate with the polymerization time of the acrylamide gels representing an inherent stability constant of the separation system. (wikipedia.org)
  • exposure
  • While evidence from human studies on the impact of acrylamide in the diet is inconclusive, scientists agree that acrylamide in food has the potential to cause cancer in humans as well and it would be prudent to reduce exposure. (food.gov.uk)
  • This document was prepared by NIOSH and Criteria Group of Occupational Standard Setting, Research Dept., National Insitute of Occupational Health (NIOH) to provide the scientific basic for establishing recommended exposure levels to acrylamide. (cdc.gov)
  • Presents a standard to prevent the adverse effects of exposure to Acrylamide over a working lifetime. (cdc.gov)
  • This includes assessing exposure levels, conducting toxicology research, and finding ways to mitigate acrylamide levels in food. (doctoroz.com)
  • Symptoms of acrylamide exposure include dermatitis in the exposed area and peripheral neuropathy. (wikipedia.org)
  • starchy foods
  • Acrylamide is a chemical created when some foods, particularly starchy foods like potatoes and bread, are cooked for long periods at high temperatures, such as when baking, frying, grilling, toasting and roasting. (food.gov.uk)
  • Formation
  • Storing raw potatoes in the fridge may lead to the formation of more free sugars in the potatoes (a process sometimes referred to as 'cold sweetening') and can increase overall acrylamide levels especially if the potatoes are then fried, roasted or baked. (food.gov.uk)
  • Chemical
  • Class 6.1 Conversion factors: 1 ppm = 2.91 mg/m 3 air, or 1 mg/m 3 = 0.34 ppm at 25 C and 101.4 kPa (760 mm Hg) 1.2 Physical and Chemical Properties Acrylamide is a colourless to white odourless solid that are melts at 84-85 C. On crystallization from benzene, leaf- or flake-like crystals are formed. (inchem.org)
  • Acrylamide is an industrial chemical which is used in several ways, such as production of polyacrylamides for (waste)water treatment, textile, paper processing and cosmetics. (wikipedia.org)
  • food
  • Acrylamide is not deliberately added to foods, it is a natural by-product of the cooking process and has always been present in our food. (food.gov.uk)
  • While we can't completely avoid risks like acrylamide in food, eating a healthy, balanced diet that includes basing meals on starchy carbohydrates and getting your 5 A Day will help reduce your risk of cancer. (food.gov.uk)
  • Most recently, in 2015, the EFSA published its first full risk assessment of acrylamide in food , which confirms that acrylamide levels found in food potentially increases the risk of cancer for all age groups. (food.gov.uk)
  • New legislation will require food businesses operators to put in place simple practical steps to manage acrylamide within their food safety management systems. (food.gov.uk)
  • The FDA is currently conducting research studies to determine whether acrylamide in food is a potential risk to human health. (doctoroz.com)
  • While some studies have shown that acrylamide in very high doses caused cancer in animals and nerve damage in people exposed to very high levels at work, acrylamide levels in food are much lower. (doctoroz.com)
  • The FDA intends to issue draft guidance for industry concerning acrylamide in food. (doctoroz.com)
  • The FDA's best advice for consumers regarding acrylamide is eating a balanced diet, avoiding too much fried food, and following a few simple steps for storing and/or preparing certain foods. (doctoroz.com)
  • Food industry workers exposed to twice the average level of acrylamide do not exhibit higher cancer rates. (wikipedia.org)
  • cancer
  • Laboratory tests show that acrylamide in the diet causes cancer in animals. (food.gov.uk)
  • This raised worldwide public concern because studies in laboratory animals suggested acrylamide had the potential to cause cancer in humans. (food.gov.uk)
  • An important aim of the EPIC Acrylamide Working Group is therefore to evaluate the foods that contribute to dietary AA intake, and to determine risks of developing cancer (endometrial, ovarian, pancreatic, breast, oesophageal, and other sites) in individuals with higher dietary consumption of AA. (iarc.fr)
  • As of 2016[update] it is still not clear whether acrylamide consumption affects people's risk of developing cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • As of 2014[update] it is still not clear whether dietary acrylamide consumption affects people's risk of developing cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acrylamide is also a skin irritant and may be a tumor initiator in the skin, potentially increasing risk for skin cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • temperatures
  • The duration and temperature of cooking determines the amount of acrylamide produced: long durations and higher temperatures form more acrylamide than short durations and lower temperatures. (food.gov.uk)
  • potential
  • Laboratory research has found that some phytochemicals may have the potential to be developed into drugs which could alleviate the toxicity of acrylamide. (wikipedia.org)
  • found
  • Acrylamide has also been found to have neurotoxic effects in humans who have been exposed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acrylamide is found at high levels in dark-colored baked, roasted and fried high-carbohydrate foods, as well as in roasted coffee and barbecued meat. (wikipedia.org)
  • risk
  • The FSA has been working to understand more about acrylamide, reduce the risk that it presents and provide advice to both industry and consumers. (food.gov.uk)
  • molecular
  • But hereafter, I would -like to cut my acrylamide gel in thin slices of about 2mm, because in this -way I can identify the molecular weights of possible labeled proteins. (bio.net)
  • solution
  • I've gotten an acrylamide solution from a commercial source (just need to add TEMED when needed) that I aliquot out into 100ml sterile bottles and store in the -20C freezer. (bio.net)
  • process
  • This process can also produce acrylamide. (food.gov.uk)
  • 1. A process for making dry and/or wet strength paper which comprises absorbing an effective amount, as a latent strengthening agent, of a composition comprising microparticles of a glyoalated (meth)acrylamide-containing polymeric material having (1) sufficient glyoal-reactive amide substituents and --CHOHCHO substituents to cross-link, said --CHOHCHO substituents being present in an excess of about 0.5 weight percent and (2) diameters ranging from about 200 to about 3000Å. (google.com)