• acclimatation
  • Acclimatisation (also called acclimation or acclimatation) is the process in which an individual organism adjusts to a change in its environment (such as a change in altitude, temperature, humidity, photoperiod, or pH), allowing it to maintain performance across a range of environmental conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1854, the Société zoologique d'acclimatation was founded in Paris by French naturalist Isidore Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, whose 1849 treatise Acclimatation et domestication des animaux utiles ("Acclimatization and Domestication of Useful Animals") had urged the French government to introduce, and when necessary selectively breed, foreign animals both to provide meat and to control pests. (wikipedia.org)
  • 19th
  • Marzluff writes that the motives of the 19th century acclimatization enthusiasts were largely cultural: "Western European settlers introduced many species throughout the world because they wanted birds from their homelands in their new environs. (wikipedia.org)
  • process
  • It has sometimes been asserted that they should be differentiated by reserving acclimatization for a wild/natural process (e.g., shedding heavy winter fur with natural seasonal change) and reserving acclimation for changes occurring in response to an artificial or controlled situation, such as changes in temperature imposed in an experiment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acclimatisation is the process by which the nervous system fails to respond to a stimulus, as a result of the repeated stimulation of a transmission across a synapse. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acclimatisation in the nineteenth century was scientifically understood to mean the process by which animals and plants gradually adapt to climatic and environmental conditions different to those that prevailed in their original habitats. (wikipedia.org)
  • rather, it speeds up part of the acclimatization process which in turn helps to relieve symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • In contrast to changes that occur during growth and development , acclimatization, as defined above, refers to an adaptive change that is reversible when conditions return to their former condition. (britannica.com)
  • Not only does acclimatization prepare them with a margin of safety but some microorganisms, insects, and plants tolerate experimental exposure at temperatures far colder or warmer than ever occur in nature. (britannica.com)
  • Acclimatisation is believed to occur when the synaptic knob of the presynaptic neurone runs out of vesicles containing neurotransmitters due to overuse over a short period of time. (wikipedia.org)
  • The episodes usually are considered by the lay public to be due to unaccustomed food, water or climate and are spoken of as "acclimatization diarrhea", or are given names such as "Simla trots", "Hongkong dog" and "Delhi belly", varying with the locality in which they occur. (ajtmh.org)
  • climate
  • In dealing with acclimatization, the influence of climate upon life can be treated under headings of adjustments to temperature, humidity, salinity, light, pressure, and certain chemical substances in the environment. (britannica.com)
  • high
  • In 2009, the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) issued high school-specific pre-season heat-acclimatization guidelines (1) as part of its ongoing effort to reduce the number of heat-related athletic injuries in secondary schools. (momsteam.com)
  • Because the risk of exertional heat illnesses during the pre-season heat-acclimatization period is high, the consensus statement strongly recommends that an athletic trainer be on site before, during, and after all practices. (momsteam.com)
  • Blood lactate concentration during exercise decreases after acclimatization to high altitude, but it is not clear whether there is decreased lactate release from the exercising muscle or if other mechanisms are involved. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Article
  • The concept of the death zone (originally the lethal zone) was first conceived in 1953 by Edouard Wyss-Dunant, a Swiss doctor, in an article about acclimatization published in the journal of the Swiss Foundation for Alpine Research. (wikipedia.org)
  • animals
  • In Australia, however, scientific theory was not a primary motivation and acclimatisation came to represent simply the exchange of plants and animals with other countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • given
  • While breathing O2-enriched air after acclimatization at a given O2 consumption the venous and arterial lactate concentrations and the venous and arterial concentration differences were significantly lower, and the net lactate release tended to be lower than while breathing ambient air at sea level before acclimatization. (biomedsearch.com)