• time
  • This is something that you need to understand - the zero to 60 mph (96 km/h) acceleration time has been achieved in an astonishing 1.513 seconds and within a distance of just 100 feet. (inautonews.com)
  • Instantaneous acceleration, meanwhile, is the limit of the average acceleration over an infinitesimal interval of time. (wikipedia.org)
  • that is, the area under the curve of an acceleration vs. time (a vs. t) graph corresponds to velocity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cohort acceleration programs, in which a number of students are accelerated together at the same time, are often especially effective. (wikipedia.org)
  • This form of acceleration poses fewer obstacles than others, as places the student in a peer group with whom the student is likely to remain for some time. (wikipedia.org)
  • A sample acceleration clause reads like this: In the event of default in the payment of any of the said installments or said interest when due as herein provided, time being of the essence hereof, the holder of this note may, without notice or demand, declare the entire principal sum then unpaid immediately due and payable. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Planck acceleration is the acceleration from zero speed to the speed of light during one Planck time. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Planck acceleration is the highest acceleration conceivable in the Universe, as the speed of light is the highest possible speed and the Planck time is the shortest possible duration of any meaningful physical process. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, since the Planck time is the least conceivable delay, the "instantaneous" production of a photon pair can not be distinguished from the acceleration of a photon from zero to the speed of light in a Planck time, thereby achieving a Planck acceleration. (wikipedia.org)
  • In other words, nothing higher than the Planck acceleration can be measured, since that would imply measuring a time interval shorter than the Planck time. (wikipedia.org)
  • shock
  • Plasma acceleration is a technique for accelerating charged particles, such as electrons, positrons, and ions, using the electric field associated with electron plasma wave or other high-gradient plasma structures (like shock and sheath fields). (wikipedia.org)
  • Fermi acceleration, sometimes referred to as diffusive shock acceleration (a subclass of Fermi acceleration ), is the acceleration that charged particles undergo when being repeatedly reflected, usually by a magnetic mirror (see also Centrifugal mechanism of acceleration). (wikipedia.org)
  • In the environment of a shock, only particles with energies that exceed the thermal energy by much (a factor of a few at least) can cross the shock and 'enter the game' of acceleration. (wikipedia.org)
  • The resulting energy spectrum anticipated from this physical setup, however, is not universal as in the case of diffusive shock acceleration. (wikipedia.org)
  • The acceleration of cosmic rays in shock fronts - I". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. (wikipedia.org)
  • Video
  • Imagination Technologies has posted a series of job openings for OpenCL engineers, indicating that the open, general purpose GPU parallelism technology Apple spearheaded for use in Mac OS X Snow Leopard is destined to also play a significant role in boosting embedded graphics and video acceleration on the company's future handheld products. (appleinsider.com)
  • This allows, for instance, a mobile phone to decode what would generally be a very difficult, and expensive video to decode it with no stuttering, and using less battery life than un-accelerated decoding would have taken, and similar acceleration is used on a broad variety of other appliances and computers for similar reasons. (wikipedia.org)
  • Video codec acceleration is where video (usually including audio as well) encoding and decoding is accelerated in hardware. (wikipedia.org)
  • series
  • Series acceleration techniques may also be used, for example, to obtain a variety of identities on special functions . (wikipedia.org)
  • Two classical techniques for series acceleration are Euler's transformation of series and Kummer's transformation of series . (wikipedia.org)
  • The various racing competitions were Formula Acceleration 1 (FA1), the MW-V6 Pickup Series, the Legend SuperCup (LSC), the European Stock 1000 Series (ACC 1000) and the European Stock 600 Series (ACC 600). (wikipedia.org)
  • small
  • Depending upon granularity, hardware acceleration can vary from a small functional unit, to a large functional block (like motion estimation in MPEG-2). (wikipedia.org)
  • computer hardware
  • In computing, hardware acceleration is the use of computer hardware to perform some functions more efficiently than is possible in software running on a more general-purpose CPU. (wikipedia.org)
  • times
  • It hasn't been long since the California-based luxury electric automaker released into the world the Model S P100D range-topping model, and an onslaught of videos of its acceleration times soon followed. (inautonews.com)
  • science
  • The first teaching materials, written for Years 7 and 8 (ages 11-13) science lessons, were called Cognitive Acceleration through Science Education (CASE). (wikipedia.org)
  • test
  • A short comparison in a 0 to 200 km/h (124 mph) acceleration test has placed the 570S and 650S one against another. (inautonews.com)
  • An acceleration test between the Audi R8 V10 Plus and the Mercedes-AMG GT S is proving once again that we have the winner on paper. (inautonews.com)
  • A test pallet is put on a loading platform that is accelerated at a constant acceleration for 0.3 seconds or longer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pallet loads that resist an acceleration test up to 0.5 g, can be prevented from sliding and tilting in the transverse transport direction. (wikipedia.org)
  • value
  • Acquisition acceleration is the ability to engage high-value customers at a faster pace and a lower cost, no matter where they are. (adobe.com)
  • At different points on Earth, objects fall with an acceleration between 7000976399999999999♠9.764 m/s2 and 7000983400000000000♠9.834 m/s2 depending on altitude and latitude, with a conventional standard value of exactly 9.80665 m/s2 (approximately 32.174 ft/s2). (wikipedia.org)
  • applies
  • This is because Fermi acceleration only applies to particles with energies exceeding the thermal energies, and frequent collisions with surrounding particles will cause severe energy loss and as a result no acceleration will occur. (wikipedia.org)