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  • Boll
  • Weevils such as the Rice weevil, which loves all grains, and the Boll weevil, an enemy to cotton crops, can decimate entire fields of crops if left unchecked. (ehow.com)
  • The Boll Weevil. (texasescapes.com)
  • Oh, the boll weevil is a little black bug, come from Mexico they say, come all the way to Texas, just looking for a place to stay, just looking for a home, just looking for a home. (texasescapes.com)
  • Well the merchant got half the cotton , the boll weevil got the rest, Didn t leave the farmer s wife, but one old cotton dress, And it s full of holes, its full of holes. (texasescapes.com)
  • The boll weevil reached the Sabine River by early in the twentieth century, then continued across the South. (texasescapes.com)
  • The boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis) attacks cotton crops. (wikipedia.org)
  • The boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis) is a beetle which feeds on cotton buds and flowers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since 1978, the Boll Weevil Eradication Program in the U.S. allowed full-scale cultivation to resume in many regions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Boll weevils begin to die at temperatures at or below −5 °C (23 °F). Research at the University of Missouri indicates they cannot survive more than an hour at −15 °C (5 °F). The insulation offered by leaf litter, crop residues, and snow may enable the beetle to survive when air temperatures drop to these levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • The boll weevil lays its eggs inside buds and ripening bolls (fruits) of the cotton plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other limitations on boll weevil populations include extreme heat and drought. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the boll weevil entered the United States, it has cost U.S. cotton producers about $13 billion, and in recent times about $300 million per year. (wikipedia.org)
  • The boll weevil contributed to the economic woes of Southern farmers during the 1920s, a situation exacerbated by the Great Depression in the 1930s. (wikipedia.org)
  • The boll weevil appeared in Venezuela in 1949 and in Colombia in 1950. (wikipedia.org)
  • While many control methods have been investigated since the boll weevil entered the United States, insecticides have always remained the main control methods. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genetically engineered Bt cotton is not protected from the boll weevil. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although it was possible to control the boll weevil, to do so was costly in terms of insecticide costs. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] The program has been successful in eradicating boll weevils from all cotton-growing states with the exception of Texas, and most of this state is free of boll weevils. (wikipedia.org)
  • Grain
  • The safest methods of controlling weevils in the home are getting rid of contaminated products and/or freezing flour and grain products promptly upon bringing them home from the store. (ehow.com)
  • Depending on the grain kernels, the size of the weevil varies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wheat weevils cause an unknown amount of damage worldwide because keeping track of so much information is difficult, especially in places where the grain harvests are not measured. (wikipedia.org)
  • rice
  • Flour, rice, other grains, sugar and seeds are all susceptible to weevil infestations if improperly stored. (ehow.com)
  • Some weevils have the ability to fly, such as the rice weevil. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rice weevils in all stages of development can be killed by freezing infected food below -17.7 °C (0 °F) for a period of three days, or heating to 60 °C (140 °F) for a period of 15 minutes. (wikipedia.org)
  • pests
  • Many weevils are considered pests because of their ability to damage and kill crops, but others are used for biological control of invasive plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • cotton
  • The weevils hibernate during winter, then emerge when cotton plants are blooming and developing bolls. (texasescapes.com)
  • Some suggested that farmers cease planting cotton for several years to interrupt the weevil s cycle, hardly a suitable solution for the farmers who lacked alternative ways to make a living. (texasescapes.com)
  • Other avenues of control that have been explored include weevil-resistant strains of cotton, the parasitic wasp Catolaccus grandis, the fungus Beauveria bassiana, and the Chilo iridescent virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • notch
  • The weevil is known to live on New Zealand flax (Phormium tenax), feeding on leaves, where it produces a characteristic feeding notch. (wikipedia.org)
  • true
  • Primitive weevils are distinguished by having straight antennae, while true weevils have elbowed (geniculate) antennae. (wikipedia.org)
  • The elbow occurs at the end of the scape (first antennal segment) in true weevils, and the scape is usually much longer than the other antennal segments. (wikipedia.org)
  • From the true weevils, Gonipterinae and Ramphus have short scapes and little or no elbow. (wikipedia.org)
  • As Jack Harkness explains in that episode, the name "Weevil" is applied to them by Torchwood, but as communication with them is limited, the true name of their race is not known. (wikipedia.org)
  • found
  • They found the damage was severe: while a virgin lives about a month, a female weevil that has mated once lives an average of 10 days, and twice-mated ones only 9 days (Nature, vol 407, p 855). (newscientist.com)
  • As well as the Poor Knights Islands, Turbott's weevil can also be found on the Three Kings Islands and on Muriwhenua of the Hen and Chicken Islands. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although considered a coastal species, the flax weevil has been found in the Tararua Range on Phormium cookianum, a mountain flax. (wikipedia.org)
  • several
  • Weevil contamination may go unnoticed for several weeks until suddenly, the food seems overrun by small, live, wriggling bugs. (ehow.com)
  • Origin
  • Weevils are thought to be extraterrestrial in origin, but a population of a few hundred live in the sewers of Cardiff, having travelled through a spacetime rift running through the city. (wikipedia.org)