• lumbar
  • the best known is the artery of Adamkiewicz, which is usually found between T8 and L3, making the lumbar region fairly resistant to ischemia as well. (psychiatryadvisor.com)
  • Management is limited to lumbar drain placement to reduce pressure on venous outflow and to promote perfusion, and to the use of pressers to elevate perfusion pressures to the cord. (psychiatryadvisor.com)
  • 2. If spinal ischemia has occurred after thoracoabdominal surgery, consider placement of a lumbar drain for therapeutic drainage of cerebrospinal fluid. (psychiatryadvisor.com)
  • In groups B and C, the thoracic and lumbar spinal cord and renal blood flow decreased. (biomedsearch.com)
  • No microspheres were detected in the thoracic and lumbar spinal cord of group C. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Outcomes that will be measured in spinal cord injured patients include the eligibility and recruitment rate of patients, the time required to institute lumbar drainage, and adverse effects related to CSF drain insertion and CSF drainage. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • that part of the central nervous system lodged in the spinal canal, extending from the foramen magnum to a point in the lumbar or sacral vertebrae, depending on the species. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • It has several other names, including: Adamkiewicz artery great radicular artery of Adamkiewicz major anterior segmental medullary artery artery of the lumbar enlargement great anterior radiculomedullary artery great anterior segmental medullary artery It typically arises from a left posterior intercostal artery at the level of the 9th to 12th intercostal artery, which branches from the aorta, and supplies the lower two thirds of the spinal cord via the anterior spinal artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a study of approximately 70 people that examined the spinal cord's blood supply it was found that: The Adamkiewicz artery sometimes arises from a lumbar vessel. (wikipedia.org)
  • Great radicular artery of Adamkiewicz… provides the major blood supply to the lumbar and sacral cord. (wikipedia.org)
  • occlusion
  • The ED50 (effective dose 50) for neuroprotection was 0.3 mg/kg and the majority of the animals were protected against the ischemia-induced damage at doses greater than or equal to 3 mg/kg, when dizocilpine was given one hour prior to the occlusion of the carotid arteries, although other studies have shown protection up to 24 hours post-insult. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are three major mechanisms of ischemia in the brain: embolism traveling to the brain, in situ thrombotic occlusion in the intracranial vessels supplying the parenchyma of the brain, and stenosis of vessels leading to poor perfusion secondary to flow-limiting diameter. (wikipedia.org)
  • posterior spinal a
  • Reduced blood flow to the spinal cord which is supplied by the anterior spinal artery and the paired posterior spinal arteries. (curehunter.com)
  • unlike the anterior spinal artery, which can be traced as a distinct channel throughout its course, the posterior spinal arteries are seen as somewhat larger longitudinal channels of an extensive pial arterial meshwork. (wikipedia.org)
  • Branches from the posterior spinal arteries form a free anastomosis around the posterior roots of the spinal nerves, and communicate, by means of very tortuous transverse branches, with the vessels of the opposite side. (wikipedia.org)
  • anesthesia
  • These individuals will be patients undergoing hip or knee surgery under a spinal anesthetic, where a small sample of CSF can be taken when their intrathecal space is accessed for the anesthesia. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • In the neurons of the central nervous system, TREK-1 channels are important in physiological, pathophysiological, and pharmacological processes, including having a role in electrogenesis, ischemia, and anesthesia. (wikipedia.org)
  • acute spinal
  • Long-term outcome of acute spinal cord ischemia syndrome. (naver.com)
  • The overall purpose of this pilot study is to evaluate CSF drainage as a potential neuroprotective strategy after acute spinal cord injury (SCI). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • This pilot study will evaluate the safety and feasibility of a clinical trial protocol for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage as a potential treatment for patients with acute spinal cord injury. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Both groups will have CSF and blood sampled at pre-defined intervals in order to evaluate CSF cytokine expression after acute spinal cord injury. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The results of this pilot study will provide feasibility and safety information that will be critical in the both the decision to pursue and in the planning of a larger prospective randomized clinical trial to formally assess the clinical efficacy of CSF drainage as a therapy for patients with acute spinal cord injury. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • hypoxia
  • In the central nervous system, ischemic tolerance is elicited by a number of preconditioning stimuli, including brief ischemia, 7-9 spreading depression, 10,11 hypoxia, 12 hyperthermia, 13 and repetitive hyperbaric oxygen. (asahq.org)
  • 2000
  • A cervical anterior spinal artery syndrome after diagnostic blockade of the right C6-nerve root (2000) Brouwers Paul J.A.M et al. (naver.com)
  • Rapid Upregulation of Caspase-3 in Rat Spinal Cord after Injury: mRNA, Protein, and Cellular Localization Correlates with Apoptotic Cell Death (2000) Citron Bruce A et al. (naver.com)
  • stimulation
  • Opioid peptide response to spinal cord stimulation in chronic critical limb ischemia. (unibo.it)
  • Twelve patients with chronic critical limb ischemia in whom a spinal cord stimulation (SCS) system had been implanted for at least one year had increased microvascular flow and achieved healing of trophic acral lesions. (unibo.it)
  • The persistence of high plasma opioid levels after switching off the spinal cord stimulation explains the absence of subjective complaints and suggests an involvement of opioids in the regulation and improvement of the microcirculation. (unibo.it)
  • Spinal cord stimulation is a form of invasive neuromodulation therapy in common use since the 1980s. (wikipedia.org)
  • arterial supply
  • Similarly, hemorrhage into the cord or around the cord may cause compression of the arterial supply and produce cord ischemia. (psychiatryadvisor.com)
  • This technique leaves the branches of the aorta un-perfused during the time it takes to sew in the graft, potentially increasing the risk of ischemia to the organs which derive their arterial supply from the clamped segment. (wikipedia.org)
  • injuries
  • Urinary retention is also common, as is seen with other acute cord injuries. (psychiatryadvisor.com)
  • Few traumas to the human body are as suddenly and permanently devastating as spinal cord injuries. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Treatment of spinal cord injuries starts with stabilizing the spine and controlling inflammation to prevent further damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • In many cases, spinal cord injuries require substantial, long-term physical and occupational therapy in rehabilitation, especially if they interfere with activities of daily living. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research within the Krembil is directed at the development of treatments for neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease), epilepsy, stroke, brain tumours, concussions, spinal cord injuries, neurophthalmologic and other ocular disorders, multiple sclerosis and autoimmune disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • Depending on the location and severity of damage along the spinal cord, the symptoms can vary widely, from pain or numbness to paralysis to incontinence. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • 3. If spinal cord ischemia has resulted from a known or suspected embolic origin, consider IV tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). (psychiatryadvisor.com)
  • Recently, the phenomenon of induced ischemic tolerance, i.e. , development of higher ischemic tolerance against otherwise injurious intervals of ischemia, has been described in tissue of several organs, including the brain, heart, and kidneys. (asahq.org)
  • arteries
  • Rostrally, branches from the vertebral arteries come together in the midline to form the anterior spinal artery. (psychiatryadvisor.com)
  • The posterior spinal artery (dorsal spinal arteries) arises from the vertebral artery in 25% of humans or the posterior inferior cerebellar artery in 75% of humans, adjacent to the medulla oblongata. (wikipedia.org)
  • At the level of the conus medullaris, the posterior spinals are more frequently seen as distinct arteries, communicating with the anterior spinal artery to form a characteristic "basket" which angiographically defines the caudal extent of the spinal cord and its transition to the cauda equina. (wikipedia.org)
  • hippocampus
  • The administration of dizocilpine protected the hippocampus from ischemia-induced neurodegeneration in the gerbil. (wikipedia.org)
  • KCC2 is a neuron-specific membrane protein expressed throughout the central nervous system, including the hippocampus, hypothalamus, brainstem, and motoneurons of the ventral spinal cord. (wikipedia.org)
  • lesion
  • These models have involved different species (focusing on rodents, felines and primates) and have employed different lesion methods (including contusion, compression and laceration) at different locations of the spinal cord with varying severities. (frontiersin.org)
  • These changes translate into loss of muscle function, sensation, or autonomic function in parts of the body served by the spinal cord below the level of the lesion. (wikipedia.org)
  • brain
  • Neuro-oncology is the study of brain and spinal cord neoplasms, many of which are (at least eventually) very dangerous and life-threatening (astrocytoma, glioma, glioblastoma multiforme, ependymoma, pontine glioma, and brain stem tumors are among the many examples of these). (wikipedia.org)
  • secondary
  • Others explored possible strategies to reduce secondary damage following spinal insult or investigated the adaptive changes occurring in response to SCI. (frontiersin.org)