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  • Einstein
  • Of course, it was Einstein who originally ordered dark energy when he inserted a fudge factor called the cosmological constant into his gravitational equations describing the universe. (nytimes.com)
  • In 1935, the physicists Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen wrote a paper outlining what is now called the EPR paradox . (blogspot.com)
  • Einstein described gravity as equivalent to curves in space and time, but physicists have long searched for a theory of gravitons, its putative quantum-scale source. (wired.com)
  • During high school or college, many aspiring physicists latch onto Feynman or Einstein or Hawking as representing all they hope to become. (discovermagazine.com)
  • Einstein-Smoluchowski relation Feynman-Smoluchowski ratchet List of Poles (physicists) Probability Smoluchowski coagulation equation Smoluchowski factor Statistics Smoluchowski, M. (1906), "Zur kinetischen Theorie der Brownschen Molekularbewegung und der Suspensionen" (PDF), Annalen der Physik, 21 (14): 756-780, Bibcode:1906AnP. (wikipedia.org)
  • bunch
  • Well, a bunch of physicists started criticizing the uncertainty principle, saying things like, "Oh, your equipment just sucks at these tiny levels," or, "Hey, you're just using too clumsy a method to make your observation. (blogspot.com)
  • displaystyle
  • For example, if w is the average energy for a particle to produce a charge carrier in a detector, then the relative FWHM resolution for measuring the particle energy E is: R = F W H M μ = 2.35 F w E , {\displaystyle R={\frac {FWHM}{\mu }}=2.35{\sqrt {\frac {Fw}{E}}},} where the factor of 2.35 relates the standard deviation to the FWHM. (wikipedia.org)
  • critical
  • In 1904 he was the first to note the existence of density fluctuations in the gas phase, and in 1908 he was the first physicist to ascribe the phenomenon of critical opalescence to large density fluctuations. (wikipedia.org)
  • book
  • A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather than Nothing is a non-fiction book by the physicist Lawrence M. Krauss, initially published on January 10, 2012 by Free Press. (wikipedia.org)
  • He has stated in many interviews and in an episode of Wonders of the Universe that when he was 12, the book Cosmos by Carl Sagan was a key factor in inspiring him to become a physicist. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • According to physicist Philip Warren Anderson, the term was coined by him and Volker Heine, when they changed the name of their group at the Cavendish Laboratories, Cambridge from Solid state theory to Theory of Condensed Matter in 1967, as they felt it did not exclude their interests in the study of liquids, nuclear matter, and so on. (wikipedia.org)
  • Roman became a notable physicist who worked in Poland, and after World War II settled in the United States (the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton). (wikipedia.org)
  • series
  • The truncated versions of this series also allow physicists to prove that special relativity reduces to Newtonian mechanics at low speeds. (wikipedia.org)
  • BBC Two commissioned Cox to copresent Stargazing Live, a three-day live astronomy series in January 2011 - co-presented with physicist-turned-comedian Dara Ó Briain and featuring chat show host Jonathan Ross - linked to events across the United Kingdom. (wikipedia.org)
  • measure
  • In statistics, the Fano factor, like the coefficient of variation, is a measure of the dispersion of a probability distribution of a Fano noise. (wikipedia.org)
  • work
  • At the Mercy Cancer Center , three uniquely qualified specialists―a medical physicist, a dosimetrist and a radiation oncologist―work together to determine the parameters for a course of radiation treatment. (dignityhealth.org)
  • Gaunt used a 'g' function in his 1930 work, which Chandrasekhar named the 'Gaunt factor' in 1939. (wikipedia.org)
  • energy
  • Now physicists, some of whom have been reluctant to take acceleration of the universe seriously, will have to explain what this dark energy is. (nytimes.com)
  • In particle detectors, the Fano factor results from the energy loss in a collision not being purely statistical. (wikipedia.org)
  • French
  • The Foucault knife-edge test was described in 1858 by French physicist Léon Foucault to measure conic shapes of optical mirrors, with error margins measurable in fractions of wavelengths of light (or Angstroms, millionths of an inch, or nanometers). (wikipedia.org)
  • It was first proposed in 1713 by French physicist Joseph Sauveur, promoted briefly by Italian composer Giuseppe Verdi in the 19th century, then advocated by the Schiller Institute beginning in the 1980s. (wikipedia.org)
  • The French acoustic physicist Joseph Sauveur, a non-musician, researched musical pitches and determined their frequencies. (wikipedia.org)
  • meter
  • That is, if α = 1 m − 1 {\displaystyle \alpha =1\mathrm {m} ^{-1}} , the wave's amplitude decreases by a factor of 1 / e {\displaystyle 1/e} for each meter traveled. (wikipedia.org)
  • scientific
  • Note that 256 being a power of 2, only octaves (factor 2) and, in just tuning, higher-pitched perfect fifths (factor 3/2) of the scientific pitch standard will have a frequency of a convenient integer value. (wikipedia.org)
  • However scientific tuning implies an equal temperament tuning where the frequency ratio between each half tone in the scale is the same, being the 12th root of 2 (a factor of ca. 1.059463), which is not a rational number: therefore in scientific pitch only the octaves of C have a frequency of a whole number in Hertz. (wikipedia.org)
  • form
  • Using QtWayland and QtDeclarative, we give an overview of how Qt helped to ship Wayland with our acclaimed UI to a range of devices and form factors. (marketwired.com)
  • The formalism allows the calculation of the electric and magnetic fields inside and outside a spherical object and is generally used to calculate either how much light is scattered, the total optical cross section, or where it goes, the form factor. (wikipedia.org)
  • optical
  • At the end of the 19th century the physicist Ernst Abbe developed equations that allow calculating the design of optimized optical microscopes in Jena, Germany, stimulated by co-operation with the optical workshop of Carl Zeiss. (wikipedia.org)
  • industry
  • The keynote speakers will focus on a wide variety of highly compelling and relevant topics, including the usage of augmented reality (AR) in autonomous vehicles, how digital image analysis can help in the search for a cure for cancer, and why ease-of-use is one of the main factors driving innovation in the gaming industry. (marketwired.com)
  • Input from the industry advocacy group Global Climate Coalition was also a factor. (wikipedia.org)