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  • yeast
  • The primary difference between Sherry styles is biological aging, or aging under a layer of yeast, versus oxidative aging, or extended barrel aging," says Derek Brown, owner of D.C.'s The Passenger , Columbia Room , and the new Sherry-centric Mockingbird Hill . (starchefs.com)
  • Flor (Spanish and Portuguese for flower) is a winemaking term that refers to a film of yeast on the surface of wine, important in the manufacture of some styles of sherry. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, in the manufacture of sherries, the slightly porous oak barrels are deliberately filled only about five-sixths full with the young wine, leaving "the space of two fists" empty to allow the flor yeast to take form and the bung is not completely sealed. (wikipedia.org)
  • The yeast gives the resulting sherry its distinctive fresh taste, with residual flavors of fresh bread. (wikipedia.org)
  • When all the sugar has been consumed, the physiology of the yeast changes to where it begins an aerobic process of breaking down and converting the acids into other compounds such as acetaldehyde. (wikipedia.org)
  • Flavanol-anthocyanin adducts are formed during wine ageing through reactions between anthocyanins and tannins present in grape, with yeast metabolites such as acetaldehyde. (wikipedia.org)
  • flor
  • To sustain the flor film over the two or more years that are required, sherry winemakers regularly freshen up the wine by adding small amounts of younger base wine. (aromadictionary.com)
  • Sherry winemakers also often report a seasonal change in the colour and physical properties of the flor film. (aromadictionary.com)
  • Clearly, together with differences in the base wine, the changes in the type and effectiveness of the flor account go a long way to account for the subtle differences found between different fino sherries. (aromadictionary.com)
  • The flor favors cooler climates and higher humidity, so the sherries produced in the coastal Sanlúcar de Barrameda and El Puerto de Santa María have a thicker cap of flor than those produced inland in Jerez. (wikipedia.org)
  • Jerez
  • The name "Sherry" is an anglicization of "Jerez," which itself comes from the Arab name "Sherish" given to the area during the 711 A.D. invasion of the north Africans into southern Spain. (starchefs.com)
  • production
  • The aldehydes are the key ingredient necessary for the production of the delightful green almond, granny smith and nougat characters that characterise great fino sherry. (aromadictionary.com)
  • made
  • What is the soil in Sherry region, what is it largely made up of and how do Vine growers use it to best effect? (brainscape.com)
  • sweet
  • Yet in the U.S., most of the sherry that is consumed is sweet rather than dry, and fino lovers occupy the tiniest of niches. (blogspot.com)
  • wines
  • The aroma of Fino sherry wines produced by industrial biological aging for 0, 1.5, 2.5, 4.5, and 6 years in the Montilla-Moriles region (southern Spain) was studied by gas chromatography-olfactometry. (hindawi.com)
  • In this work, changes in odor descriptors during biological aging of Fino sherry wines are studied with a view to estimating their different participation in the aroma profile and to establish the sequence of the odorant series which constitute the aroma fingerprint of these wines. (hindawi.com)
  • This process drastically lowers the acidity of the wine and makes sherry one of the most aldehydic wines in the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • Examples of wine faults include acetaldehyde (except when purposely induced in wines like Sherry and Rancio), ethyl acetate and cork taint. (wikipedia.org)
  • This region produces mainly sweet dessert wines using similar techniques to those used for the production of sherry, that is, by crianza bajo velo de flor (which involves allowing a "veil" of flor yeast to form on the surface of the must in the casks) and por el sistema de criaderas y soleras (which refers to the process of aging the wine in soleras). (wikipedia.org)
  • Apart from forming a barrier between the wine and the air, the flor also cause certain chemical phenomena in the wine which affect the taste: they consume glycerine (thus conferring a typically dry character to the wine), they significantly reduce the volatile acidity level of the wine, and they produce great quantities of paraldehydes and acetaldehydes which are responsible for the almond notes of the wines. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fino
  • Dry and very light in color, Fino Sherries are typically made from the juice that runs out of the grapes as they are crushed under their own weight. (starchefs.com)
  • This variety registers at about 15 to 17 percent alcohol by volume and is best served chilled at 7°C to 10°C. Sweetened Fino is called Pale Cream Sherry. (starchefs.com)
  • I picked La Ina, which is a kind of younger, sharper Fino Sherry. (starchefs.com)
  • Flor
  • The flor favors cooler climates and higher humidity, so the sherries produced in the coastal Sanlúcar de Barrameda and El Puerto de Santa María have a thicker cap of flor than those produced inland in Jerez. (wikipedia.org)
  • Jerez
  • The name "Sherry" is an anglicization of "Jerez," which itself comes from the Arab name "Sherish" given to the area during the 711 A.D. invasion of the north Africans into southern Spain. (starchefs.com)
  • Stemming from the humble Palomino grape grown in the Jerez region of southwestern Spain, the various styles of Sherry span an impressive diversity of flavors. (starchefs.com)