• Esaki
  • This period included pioneering work on superlattice heterostructures with Nobel Prize-winning physicist Leo Esaki. (wikipedia.org)
  • The impact of the research carried out in the 1970s by Chang and his colleagues, including Nobel Prize-winning Leo Esaki and Ray Tsu, was highlighted by IBM researchers Theis and Coufal in 2004: Leo Esaki, Ray Tsu, and Leroy Chang began to envision and investigate designed quantum structures - which are based on interfaces between lattice-matched compound semiconductors - early in the 1970s. (wikipedia.org)
  • He shared the prize with physicists Leo Esaki and Ivar Giaever, who jointly received half the award for their own work on quantum tunnelling. (wikipedia.org)
  • physical
  • This is one of the first documented examples in which a physical quantum processor has been applied to real biological data . (bctechnology.com)
  • In addition to such algorithms, there is a plethora of other applications: quantum cryptography, quantum communication, simulation of physical systems, and many others. (cwi.nl)
  • He has played a leading role in the development of the lattice formulation of QCD into a quantitative non-perturbative technique and in the use of this formulation to compute, from first principles, a number of physical quantities, including deep inelastic structure functions, electromagnetic form factors of hadrons and semi-leptonic decays of charmed mesons. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since Paul Forman's 1987 article "Behind quantum electronics: National security as a basis for physical research in the United State, 1940-1960," there has been an ongoing historical debate over precisely how and to what extent military funding affected the course of scientific research and discovery. (wikipedia.org)
  • computational
  • Chemistry PhD candidate Richard Li, computational nano/bio physicist Rosa Di Felice, quantum computing expert and Viterbi Professor of Engineering Daniel Lidar along with computational biologist Remo Rohs sought to apply machine learning to derive models from biological data to predict whether certain sequences of DNA represented strong or weak binding sites for binding of a particular set of transcription factors. (bctechnology.com)
  • Quantum computation is the field that investigates the computational power and other properties of computers based on quantum-mechanical principles. (cwi.nl)
  • However, the real aim is to find computational problems where a quantum computer is much more efficient than classical computers. (cwi.nl)
  • As of 2018,[update] the development of actual quantum computers is still in its infancy, but experiments have been carried out in which quantum computational operations were executed on a very small number of quantum bits. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2018
  • At the JEC World Composite Show in Paris in March 2018, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be focusing on the latest trends and innovations in laser machining of composites. (innovations-report.com)
  • Burnaby, BC, March 15, 2018--(T-Net)-- D-Wave Systems has announced that anew research study by USC Viterbi shows D-Wave's Two X quantum computing machine has promise for biological research. (bctechnology.com)
  • 1993
  • 1993 Dan Simon, at Université de Montréal, invented an oracle problem for which a quantum computer would be exponentially faster than a conventional computer. (wikipedia.org)
  • theory
  • But at the beginning of the twentieth century, Newton's equations have been replaced by those of quantum theory, which bring back an element of indeterminism, quite similar, in fact, to Epicurus's correction of Democritus's determinism. (edge.org)
  • This theory is best illustrated by the quantum double slit experiment. (keelynet.com)
  • Physicists should rethink interference experiments to reveal whether or not general relativity follows classical theory, argue Chiara Marletto and Vlatko Vedral. (nature.com)
  • English translation from the German) Annalen der Physik 26 (8): 673-696 (1936) Mehra, Jagdish, and Helmut Rechenberg The Historical Development of Quantum Theory. (wikipedia.org)
  • the brain's unsuitability to host the quantum phenomena required by the theory, since it is considered too "warm, wet and noisy" to avoid decoherence. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some physicists speculate that the CTCs which appear in certain GR solutions might be ruled out by a future theory of quantum gravity which would replace GR, an idea which Stephen Hawking has labeled the chronology protection conjecture. (wikipedia.org)
  • superpositions
  • Whereas common digital computing requires that the data be encoded into binary digits (bits), each of which is always in one of two definite states (0 or 1), quantum computation uses quantum bits, which can be in superpositions of states. (wikipedia.org)
  • specifically, he believes that microtubules within neurons support quantum superpositions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Shor's
  • Large-scale quantum computers would theoretically be able to solve certain problems much more quickly than any classical computers that use even the best currently known algorithms, like integer factorization using Shor's algorithm or the simulation of quantum many-body systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • efficiently
  • On the other hand, quantum computers may be able to efficiently solve problems which are not practically feasible on classical computers. (wikipedia.org)
  • algorithm
  • A second important quantum algorithm is Grover's search algorithm, which searches through an unordered search space quadratically faster than is possible classically. (cwi.nl)
  • 1996 Lov Grover, at Bell Labs, invented the quantum database search algorithm. (wikipedia.org)
  • There exist quantum algorithms, such as Simon's algorithm, that run faster than any possible probabilistic classical algorithm. (wikipedia.org)
  • The outcome can therefore be at most n {\displaystyle n} classical bits of information (or, if the algorithm did not end with a measurement, the result is an unobserved quantum state). (wikipedia.org)
  • structures
  • Further, the diamond nanowire is designed to overcome hurdles that have challenged other state-of-the-art systemssuch as those based on fluorescent dye molecules, quantum dots, and carbon nanotubesas the device can be readily replicated and integrated with a variety of nano-machined structures. (bio-medicine.org)
  • bits
  • So by using quantum computers, even quite simple ones, once again you surpass the limits of classical computers when you get down to, say, 30 or 40 bits in your quantum computer. (edge.org)
  • 1982
  • 1982 Paul Benioff proposes the first recognisable theoretical framework for a quantum computer William Wootters and Wojciech Zurek, and independently Dennis Dieks prove the no-cloning theorem. (wikipedia.org)
  • Science
  • This might change with a new study from the USC Center for Quantum Information Science & Technology at the Viterbi School of Engineering and the USC Dana and David Dornsife College of Arts, Letters and Sciences. (bctechnology.com)
  • CAMBRIDGE, Mass., By creating diamond-based nanowire devices, a team at Harvard has taken another step towards making applications based on quantum science and technology possible. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Starting with these synthetic, nanostructured diamond samples, we can start dreaming about the diamond-based devices and systems that could one day lead to applications in quantum science and technology as well as in sensing and imaging. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The course is taught from a computer science perspective but should be accessible for physicists as well. (cwi.nl)
  • The course is taught from a mathematical and theoretical computer science perspective, but should be accessible for physicists as well. (cwi.nl)
  • Physicists also contributed to the war effort, developing wireless communication technologies and sound-based methods of detecting U-boats, resulting in the first tenuous long-term connections between academic science and the military. (wikipedia.org)
  • algorithms
  • Quantum algorithms are often probabilistic, in that they provide the correct solution only with a certain known probability. (wikipedia.org)
  • Professor
  • Professor Keith Frayn from the University of Oxford, Chairman of the Task Force, said 'this timely and comprehensive report provides an authoritative and independent account of the relationship between diet and the emerging risk factors for cardiovascular disease. (innovations-report.com)
  • conventional
  • We chose to attack the problem using machine learning implemented on a D-Wave quantum annealer, in order to test our ability to translate complicated real-life biology problems to the setting of quantum machine learning, and to look for any advantages this approach might offer over more conventional, yet state-of-the-art classical machine learning techniques," Lidar added . (bctechnology.com)
  • computer
  • An analysis of the world's first commercially available quantum computer found it to be no faster than a classical personal computer. (csmonitor.com)
  • The world's first commercial quantum computer, made by the Canadian company D-Wave Systems Inc., performed no better than a classical computer in a recent analysis. (csmonitor.com)
  • The company D-Wave, based in Burnaby, Canada, built what it called the first commercial quantum computer in 2011. (csmonitor.com)
  • It allowed a quantum computer to factor large integers quickly. (wikipedia.org)
  • He conjectured that it might be possible to do this using something like a quantum computer. (edge.org)
  • A quantum computer is a device that performs quantum computing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Along with the IBM computer a company called D-Wave has also been developing their own version of a quantum computer that uses a process called annealing. (wikipedia.org)
  • large
  • By creating large device arrays rather than just "one-of-a-kind" designs, the realization of quantum networks and systems, which require the integration and manipulation of many devices in parallel, is more likely. (bio-medicine.org)
  • suitable
  • The finding could lead to a new class of nanostructured diamond devices suitable for quantum communication and computing, as well as advance areas ranging from biological and chemical sensing to scientific imaging. (bio-medicine.org)
  • classical computers
  • Quantum computers are thought to be able to solve complex problems thousands of times faster than classical computers, and scientists have been working on developing them for more than a decade. (csmonitor.com)
  • systems
  • The first quantum computers, made by the Canadian company D-Wave Systems, Inc., may be no faster than classical PCs, a study finds. (csmonitor.com)
  • Moreover, spatially separated quantum systems may be entangled with each other and operations may have ``non-local'' effects because of this. (cwi.nl)
  • virtually
  • A major Canadian-led global study has found that the vast majority of heart attacks may be predicted by nine easily measurable factors and that these factors are the same in virtually every region and ethnic group worldwide. (innovations-report.com)
  • These risk factors appear to predict the majority of the risk in virtually every region, every ethnic group, in men and women and in the old and the young," said Yusuf. (innovations-report.com)
  • real
  • To date, much has been stated about the promise of quantum computing for myriad of applications but there have been few examples of a quantum advantage for real-world problems of practical interest. (bctechnology.com)