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  • genus
  • any of 12 species of ornamental and timber evergreen conifers constituting the genus Cupressus of the family Cupressaceae, distributed throughout warm-temperate and subtropical regions of Asia, Europe, and North America. (britannica.com)
  • There are 18 species in the weevil genus Gerstaeckeria in North America, north of Mexico. (ufl.edu)
  • Weevils of the genus Ochyromera Pascoe are small- to medium-sized insects characterized by having the profemora (or front legs) armed with a large unserrated triangular tooth and the antennae consisting of seven segments in the funicle (or apical portion) (Warner 1961). (ufl.edu)
  • The most important groups of natural enemies associated with garlic mustard were weevils (particularly the genus Ceutorhynchus), leaf beetles, butterflies, and moths, including the larvae of some moth species such as the Garden Carpet moth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Larva
  • Larva of Gerstaeckeria hubbardi (LaConte), a cactus weevil. (ufl.edu)
  • The distinctive urogomphus (or terminal cuticular process) visible on the apical abdominal segment of the ligustrum weevil larva is a unique character. (ufl.edu)
  • adult weevils
  • After the larvae have turned into adult weevils, the damage can be seen, but by then, it is considered to be too late for the tree. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although the feeding of the adult weevils does little damage to the plant, the activities of the larvae, especially if there are several in one rootstock, weaken the plant, make it more susceptible to stressful conditions and reduce the quantity of seed produced. (wikipedia.org)
  • Florida
  • A seed-attacking weevil was found attacking Chinese privet in Tallahassee, Leon County, Florida (Cuda and Zeller 1998). (ufl.edu)
  • Voucher specimens of the larval and adult stages of the ligustrum weevil were deposited in the Florida State Collection of Arthropods, Division of Plant Industry, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Gainesville. (ufl.edu)
  • leaf
  • Although it prefers Japanese privet, the ligustrum weevil also has been collected from wax-leaf ligustrum, L. lucidum Ait. (ufl.edu)
  • Boll weevils begin to die at temperatures at or below −5 °C (23 °F). Research at the University of Missouri indicates they cannot survive more than an hour at −15 °C (5 °F). The insulation offered by leaf litter, crop residues, and snow may enable the beetle to survive when air temperatures drop to these levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • seeds
  • New adults emerge from the seeds (one weevil per seed) in mid-May, and there is only one generation per year. (ufl.edu)
  • adults
  • Six weevil adults that emerged from the infested seed sample were later identified (by M. C. Thomas) as the ligustrum weevil, Ochyromera ligustri Warner. (ufl.edu)
  • In North Carolina, adults are active from late June to early July. (ufl.edu)
  • year
  • Since the boll weevil entered the United States, it has cost U.S. cotton producers about $13 billion, and in recent times about $300 million per year. (wikipedia.org)
  • control
  • Spread, impact, and control of purple loose-strife (Lythrum salicaria) in North American Wetlands. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term "biological control" was first used by Harry Scott Smith at the 1919 meeting of the Pacific Slope Branch of the American Association of Economic Entomologists, in Riverside, California. (wikipedia.org)
  • While many control methods have been investigated since the boll weevil entered the United States, insecticides have always remained the main control methods. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other avenues of control that have been explored include weevil-resistant strains of cotton, the parasitic wasp Catolaccus grandis, the fungus Beauveria bassiana, and the Chilo iridescent virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was introduced into North America to help control creeping thistle. (wikipedia.org)
  • eastern
  • In 1978, a large-scale test was begun in eastern North Carolina and in Southampton County, Virginia, to determine the feasibility of eradication. (wikipedia.org)
  • plants
  • It is not clear from the literature whether lilacs or grapes are true host plants capable of supporting complete development of the weevil. (ufl.edu)
  • Pepper weevils are attracted to these, which are sometimes referred to as "secondary host" plants. (gardenguides.com)
  • available
  • Photography: Beavertail Cactus Opuntia basilaris, California, USA, North America Author: Gaby FichtlDate: 2008-05-02 Maximum available size: 18.3 Mpix. (tradebit.com)
  • Milfoil weevils are commercially available as a management option for Eurasian water milfoil by a firm based in the United States and Canada. (wikipedia.org)
  • regions
  • Since 1978, the Boll Weevil Eradication Program in the U.S. allowed full-scale cultivation to resume in many regions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Washington
  • Digital Photography: Indian Paintbrush Castilleja miniata, Mount Rainier National Park, Washington, USA, North America Author: Gerhard Zwerger-SchonerDate: 2. (tradebit.com)
  • free
  • citation needed] The program has been successful in eradicating boll weevils from all cotton-growing states with the exception of Texas, and most of this state is free of boll weevils. (wikipedia.org)