• Ions
  • In chemistry, a coordination complex consists of a central atom or ion, which is usually metallic and is called the coordination centre, and a surrounding array of bound molecules or ions, that are in turn known as ligands or complexing agents. (wikipedia.org)
  • Originally, a complex implied a reversible association of molecules, atoms, or ions through such weak chemical bonds. (wikipedia.org)
  • A hydrated ion is one kind of a complex ion (or simply a complex), a species formed between a central metal ion and one or more surrounding ligands, molecules or ions that contain at least one lone pair of electrons, If all the ligands are monodentate, then the number of donor atoms equals the number of ligands. (wikipedia.org)
  • In his version of the theory, Jorgensen claimed that when a molecule dissociates in a solution there were two possible outcomes: the ions would bind via the ammonia chains Blomstrand had described or the ions would bind directly to the metal. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chiral molecules and ions are described by various ways of designating their absolute configuration, which codify either the entity's geometry or its ability to rotate plane-polarized light, a common technique in studying chirality. (wikipedia.org)
  • A molecular shuttle is a molecule capable of shuttling molecules or ions from one location to another. (wikipedia.org)
  • Polarity
  • In the same manner, symmetry is key in determining relative melting point as it allows for better packing in the solid state, even if it does not alter the polarity of the molecule. (wikipedia.org)
  • Atoms, molecules and cells hit by this hard electromagnetic radiation are forced to reverse polarity 1 to 100 billion times a second. (realfarmacy.com)
  • The sun's type of microwave radiation doesn't shear molecules because there is no rapid oscillation of polarity that replicates the AC powered microwave ovens. (realfarmacy.com)
  • Hydrogen
  • An example is water, where some of its hydrogen-related isotopologues are: "light water" (HOH or H2O), "semi-heavy water" with the deuterium isotope in equal proportion to protium (HDO or 1H2HO), "heavy water" with two deuterium isotopes of hydrogen per molecule (D2O or 2H2O), and "super-heavy water" or tritiated water (T2O or 3H2O), where the hydrogen atoms are replaced with tritium isotopes. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the field of stable isotope geochemistry, isotopologues of simple molecules containing rare heavy isotopes of carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, and sulfur are used to trace equilibrium and kinetic processes in natural environments and in Earth's past. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, the covalent bond between hydrogen and chlorine in the molecule of HCl is a polar bond. (hubpages.com)
  • Organic molecules containboth carbon and hydrogen. (slideshare.net)
  • A molecular balance is a molecule that can interconvert between two and more conformational or configurational states in response to the dynamic of multiple intra- and intermolecular driving forces, such as hydrogen bonding, solvophobic/hydrophobic effects, π interactions, and steric and dispersion interactions. (wikipedia.org)
  • rotational
  • Molecules are mobile entities, undergoing all sorts of rotational motions that change their shapes, and those motions require energy. (britannica.com)
  • IR, microwave and Raman spectroscopy can give information about the molecule geometry from the details of the vibrational and rotational absorbance detected by these techniques. (wikipedia.org)
  • DFT and IRC calculations for these and related 1-(arylsulfonyl)indole molecules showed that the rotational barrier about the S-N bond between conformers is within the 2.5-5.5 kcal/mol range. (mdpi.com)
  • existence
  • Chandra Wickramasinghe proposed the existence of polymeric composition based on the molecule formaldehyde (H2CO). (wikipedia.org)
  • Isomerism , the existence of molecules that have the same numbers of the same kinds of atoms (and hence the same formula) but differ in chemical and physical properties. (britannica.com)
  • [ 9 ] thus demonstrating the existence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules in space. (omicsgroup.org)
  • While this debate led to the realization that the compound can be used as a molecular switch, it also created a new problem since none of the recognized types of isomerism could explain the existence of a molecule in two structural forms that differ only in the length of one or more bonds (and not in their stereochemistry or connectivity of the atoms). (wikipedia.org)
  • catenanes
  • Examples of such molecules are rotaxanes, catenanes with covalently linked rings (so-called pretzelanes), and open knots (pseudoknots) which are abundant in proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • The expression is often more generally applied to molecules that simply mimic functions that occur at the macroscopic level. (wikipedia.org)
  • trans
  • An example of a small hydrocarbon displaying cis - trans isomerism is but-2-ene . (wikipedia.org)
  • In a trans isomer, the dipoles of the substituents will cancel out [ citation needed ] due to being on opposite sides of the molecule. (wikipedia.org)
  • Molecule I is cis-1,2-dichloroethene and molecule II is trans-1,2-dichloroethene. (wikipedia.org)
  • Consider the following fluoromethylpentene: The proper name for this molecule is either trans-2-fluoro-3-methylpent-2-ene because the alkyl groups that form the backbone chain (i.e., methyl and ethyl) reside across the double bond from each other, or (Z)-2-fluoro-3-methylpent-2-ene because the highest-priority groups on each side of the double bond are on the same side of the double bond. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bonds
  • Residual topology is a descriptive stereochemical term to classify a number of intertwined and interlocked molecules, which cannot be disentangled in an experiment without breaking of covalent bonds, while the strict rules of mathematical topology allow such a disentanglement. (wikipedia.org)
  • thus
  • Thus, some molecules can be the same on one timescale or set of energy conditions but different, or isomeric, on others. (britannica.com)
  • Thus, at room temperature less than 0.07 percent of all the molecules of a given amount of water will vibrate faster than at absolute zero. (wikipedia.org)
  • energies
  • A basic hypothesis of natural medicine states that the introduction into the human body of molecules and energies, to which it is not accustomed, is much more likely to cause harm than good. (bibliotecapleyades.net)
  • different
  • The cobalt-containing molecule Co3(dpa)4Cl2 (dpa = 2,2'-dipyridylamide) was synthesized by both research groups, but each proposed a different structure: the group from Taiwan reported an unsymmetric structure with a long and a short Co-Co bond, whereas the Texas group identified a symmetric structure with equal Co-Co bond lengths. (wikipedia.org)
  • differences
  • He described the isomerism by differences in the bond structure of the molecules whereas several other scientists found it more convincing to describe the difference by the relatively new concept of stereochemistry. (wikipedia.org)
  • form
  • This finding suggests that complex organic molecules may form in stellar systems prior to the formation of planets, eventually arriving on young planets early in their formation. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are two elements noted for their ability to form long strings of atoms and seemingly endless varieties of molecules: one is carbon, and the other is silicon, directly below it on the periodic table. (encyclopedia.com)
  • metals
  • An EMAC molecule contains a linear string of transition metals (typically Cr, Co, Ni, or Cu) that are bonded to each other and are surrounded helically by four long organic ligands. (wikipedia.org)
  • bond
  • When a light isotope is replaced with a heavy isotope (e.g., 13C for 12C), the bond between the two atoms will vibrate more slowly, thereby lowering the zero-point energy of the bond and acting to stabilize the molecule. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fluoro is the highest-priority group on the left side of the double bond, and ethyl is the highest-priority group on the right side of the molecule. (wikipedia.org)