• Subjects
  • With The Royal Touch in Early Modern England: Politics, Medicine and Sin , Stephen Brogan offers a new understanding of the royal touch - the ability of kings and queens to miraculously heal their subjects of particular diseases in 16th and especially 17th-century England. (history.ac.uk)
  • 16th
  • Direct contact with Europeans was not renewed until Portuguese explorers and Jesuit missionaries arrived on Ming China's southern shores at the beginning of the 16th century, during the Age of Exploration. (wikipedia.org)
  • Surviving is a mediaeval Weistum (a Weistum - cognate with English wisdom - was a legal pronouncement issued by men learned in law in the Middle Ages and early modern times) from Etschberg whose text likely dates from the 16th century (1546? (wikipedia.org)
  • Roman
  • The Middle Ages follows the fall of the Western Roman Empire in 476 and precedes the Early Modern Era. (wikipedia.org)
  • These mainly take the shape of the Iron Age barrows below the Kreuzberg's peak within Schellweiler's municipal limits, another in the cadastral area called Winterhell within Kusel's limits, the cremation graveyard within Haschbach's limits and finds from Roman times, foremost those unearthed in and around the neighbouring town of Kusel. (wikipedia.org)
  • 19th
  • The concepts of "science" and "religion" are a recent invention: "religion" emerged in the 17th century in the midst of colonization and globalization and the Protestant Reformation, "science" emerged in the 19th century in the midst of attempts to narrowly define those who studied nature, and the phrase "religion and science" emerged in the 19th century due to the reification of both concepts. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wine continued to play a major role in medicine until the late 19th and early 20th century, when changing opinions and medical research on alcohol and alcoholism cast doubt on its role as part of a healthy lifestyle. (wikipedia.org)
  • world's
  • Ancient Egyptian papyri and Sumerian tablets dating back to 2200 BC detail the medicinal role of wine, making it the world's oldest documented human-made medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • 28% of Nobel Prize winners in medicine have been Jewish, although Jews comprise less than 0.2% of the world's population. (wikipedia.org)
  • scholars
  • The Congress will end in a two-day symposium on 'Reclaiming Spectacle' , which will include panels of academics, museum professionals, rogue scholars and artists discussing the intricacies of collecting the spectacular, the politics of bodily display, non-human spectacles, religion and the occult. (blogspot.com)
  • Events in Europe such as the Galileo affair, associated with the scientific revolution and the Age of Enlightenment, led scholars such as John William Draper to postulate a conflict thesis, holding that religion and science have been in conflict methodologically, factually and politically throughout history. (wikipedia.org)
  • cultures
  • Both science and religion are complex social and cultural endeavors that vary across cultures and have changed over time. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was in the 17th century that the concept of "religion" received its modern shape despite the fact that ancient texts like the Bible, the Quran, and other sacred texts did not have a concept of religion in the original languages and neither did the people or the cultures in which these sacred texts were written. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bronze Age cultures differed in their development of the first writing. (wikipedia.org)
  • texts
  • There are no extant texts of ancient medicine, as a first subject, of Hebrew origin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Though advances were made in gynaecology during the Middle Ages, the texts about gynaecology were written using the masculine form of Hebrew, indicating that gynecological texts were directed towards male doctors, not female midwives. (wikipedia.org)
  • Both texts utilize the concept of Logos and emphasize that the followers of their respective religions are apart from the rest of the world, suitable for only a few followers. (wikipedia.org)
  • metals
  • An ancient civilization is defined to be in the Bronze Age either by producing bronze by smelting its own copper and alloying with tin, arsenic, or other metals, or by trading for bronze from production areas elsewhere. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Bronze Age was a time of extensive use of metals and of developing trade networks (See Tin sources and trade in ancient times). (wikipedia.org)
  • modern
  • The Bronze Age is the second principal period of the three-age Stone-Bronze-Iron system, as proposed in modern times by Christian Jürgensen Thomsen, for classifying and studying ancient societies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Remnants of the Hippocratic Corpus survive in modern medicine in forms like the "Hippocratic Oath" as in to "Do No Harm. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ancient
  • Dates are approximate, consult particular article for details The Ancient Near East Bronze Age can be divided as following: In Mesopotamia, the Mesopotamian Bronze Age began about 3500 BC and ended with the Kassite period (c. 1500 BC - c. 1155 BC). (wikipedia.org)
  • belief
  • The idea of magic in Mage is broadly inclusive of diverse ideas about mystical practices as well as other belief systems, such as science and religion, so that most mages do not resemble typical fantasy wizards. (wikipedia.org)
  • depression
  • A team of researchers led by Steven Pirutinsky of Columbia University trained their investigative lens on the interaction between depression, physical health, and intrinsic religiosity - participating in religion for its own sake, without necessarily expecting social or material rewards - among Orthodox and non-Orthodox Jews. (patheos.com)
  • For the Orthodox, intrinsic religion was about a relationship with the Divine, and a good relationship appeared to protect against depression. (patheos.com)
  • Paris
  • Later historians such as Salvatore de Renzi and Charles Daremberg, curator of the National Library in Paris, and Leclerc, author of History of Arab Medicine, relied on this account. (wikipedia.org)
  • Body
  • Moderate levels of consumption vary by the individual according to age, gender, genetics, weight and body stature, as well as situational conditions, such as food consumption or use of drugs. (wikipedia.org)
  • In general, women absorb alcohol more quickly than men due to their lower body water content, so their moderate levels of consumption may be lower than those for a male of equal age. (wikipedia.org)
  • late
  • The usual tripartite division into an Early, Middle and Late Bronze Age is not used. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ur, Kish, Isin, Larsa and Nippur in the Middle Bronze Age and Babylon, Calah and Assur in the Late Bronze Age similarly had large populations. (wikipedia.org)
  • These were people from countries traditionally belonging to the lands of Christendom during the High to Late Middle Ages who visited, traded, performed Christian missionary work, or lived in China. (wikipedia.org)
  • Between church and state: the lives of four French prelates in the late Middle Ages by Bernard Guené, 1991. (wikipedia.org)
  • time
  • While women contributed to the advancement of Jewish medicine during this time, there were still a number of restrictions placed on them by society. (wikipedia.org)
  • Time, work & culture in the Middle Ages by Jacques Le Goff, 1980. (wikipedia.org)
  • studies
  • In December 2011, the Journal of Behavioral Medicine dedicated an entire issue to studies focusing on religion, spirituality, and health. (patheos.com)
  • Child Development & Adolescent Studies, produced by NISC, is today's source for references to the current and historical literature related to growth and development of children through the age of 21. (emory.edu)
  • culture
  • A 2013 report suggests that the earliest tin-alloy bronze dates to the mid-5th millennium BC in a Vinča culture site in Pločnik (Serbia), although the civilization is not conventionally considered part of the Bronze Age. (wikipedia.org)
  • knowledge
  • Biologist Stephen Jay Gould, other scientists, and some contemporary theologians hold that religion and science are non-overlapping magisteria, addressing fundamentally separate forms of knowledge and aspects of life. (wikipedia.org)
  • Both religions hold redemption, revelation and focus on the knowledge of God as the meaning of humanity's existence. (wikipedia.org)
  • This knowledge of God comes upon a mystical experience dependent upon rebirth, the focal point of arguments for influence from one of these religions upon the other. (wikipedia.org)
  • After asking in vain to see any good Italian books on medicine, he concluded that medicine in Italy was limited to simple practical knowledge. (wikipedia.org)
  • early
  • The Bronze Age is a historical period characterized by the use of bronze, proto-writing, and other early features of urban civilization. (wikipedia.org)
  • The early Mormons, most notably Joseph Smith, were linked with magic, alchemy, Freemasonry, divining and "other elements of radical religion" prior to Mormonism. (wikipedia.org)
  • period
  • Worldwide, the Bronze Age generally followed the Neolithic period, with the Chalcolithic serving as a transition. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the Old Elamite period (Middle Bronze Age), Elam consisted of kingdoms on the Iranian Plateau, centered in Anshan, and from the mid-2nd millennium BC, it was centered in Susa in the Khuzestan lowlands. (wikipedia.org)
  • Iron Age
  • Although the Iron Age generally followed the Bronze Age, in some areas (such as Sub-Saharan Africa), the Iron Age intruded directly on the Neolithic. (wikipedia.org)
  • health
  • Many of these papers attempt to correct shortcomings in the previous religion-health literature, including a lack of good theoretical grounding and lack of longitudinal, or long-duration, research methodologies. (patheos.com)
  • The concepts of intrinsic and extrinsic religiosity, mentioned in Part I of this article, play a major role in most social scientific research into religion and health. (patheos.com)