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  • plants
  • Medicinal plants, also called medicinal herbs, have been discovered and used in traditional medicine practices since prehistoric times. (wikipedia.org)
  • Further, the phytochemical content and pharmacological actions, if any, of many plants having medicinal potential remain unassessed by rigorous scientific research to define efficacy and safety. (wikipedia.org)
  • The earliest historical records of herbs are found from the Sumerian civilisation, where hundreds of medicinal plants including opium are listed on clay tablets. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Ebers Papyrus from ancient Egypt describes over 850 plant medicines, while Dioscorides documented over 1000 recipes for medicines using over 600 medicinal plants in De materia medica, forming the basis of pharmacopoeias for some 1500 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medicinal plants are widely used in non-industrialized societies, mainly because they are readily available and cheaper than modern medicines. (wikipedia.org)
  • The annual global export value of 50,000 to 70,000 plants with suspected medicinal properties was estimated to be US$2.2 billion in 2012, and in 2017, the potential global market for botanical extracts and medicines was estimated at several hundred billion dollars. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medicinal plants face both general threats, such as climate change and habitat destruction, and the specific threat of over-collection to meet market demand. (wikipedia.org)
  • Humans were not alone in using herbs as medicines: some animals such as non-human primates, monarch butterflies and sheep ingest medicinal plants when they are ill. (wikipedia.org)
  • In ancient Sumeria, hundreds of medicinal plants including myrrh and opium are listed on clay tablets. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is worth noting that not all the alkaloids produced by the plants in the Solanaceae family are lethal. (progressivehealth.com)
  • Peigen, Xiao and Liyi, He Ethnopharmacologic investigation on tropane-containing drugs in Chinese Solanaceous plants in Journal of Ethnopharmacology Volume 8 No. 1 July (1983) pub. (wikipedia.org)
  • These are often useful as drugs, and the content and known pharmacological activity of these substances in medicinal plants is the scientific basis for their use. (wikipedia.org)
  • The major classes of pharmacologically active phytochemicals are described below, with examples of medicinal plants that contain them. (wikipedia.org)
  • Factors influencing cultivation of medicinal plants, Types of soils and fertilizers of common use. (pharmacognizeblog.com)
  • Pest management and natural pest control agents, Plant hormones and their applications, Polyploidy, mutation and hybridization with reference to medicinal plants. (pharmacognizeblog.com)
  • The second and major part of this chapter provides examples from different fields of bioengineering in plants including: (a) the production of nutraceuticals, (b) modifying volatiles and pigments (in fruit and flowers), (c) production of medicinal agents and (d) aiding plants in the fight against biotic stresses. (springer.com)
  • Populations of A. tanguticus in this region have decreased significantly due to extensive harvesting of the species for medicinal purposes, resulting (since the roots are the part harvested) in the removal of plants in their entirety. (wikipedia.org)
  • Humans use quite a lot of these compounds, or the plants from which they originate, for medicinal and nutraceutical purposes. (wikipedia.org)
  • hī`əsēn', -sĭn) , alkaloid drug obtained from plants of the nightshade family (Solanaceae), chiefly from henbane henbane or black henbane, herb ( Hyoscyamus niger ) native to the Mediterranean region and naturalized in parts of North America. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • flavonoids
  • Phytochemical technique mainly applies to the quality control of Chinese medicine, Ayurvedic medicine(Indian traditional medicine) or herbal medicine of various chemical components, such as saponins, alkaloids, volatile oils, flavonoids and anthraquinones. (wikipedia.org)
  • Based on their biosynthetic origins, plant secondary metabolites can be divided into three major groups: Flavonoids and allied phenolic and polyphenolic compounds, Terpenoids and Nitrogen-containing alkaloids and sulphur-containing compounds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Species
  • An eighth genus referable to Hyoscyameae remains unresolved : the poorly-known, monotypic genus Pauia contains the single species Pauia belladonna Deb and Dutta native to Assam and Arunachal Pradesh. (wikipedia.org)
  • she who may not be turned (aside)' - one of the Three Fates and cutter of the thread of life / bringer of death - in reference to the extreme toxicity of A.belladonna and its fellow species - of which three others are currently accepted. (wikipedia.org)
  • A.belladonna itself is an accepted species. (wikipedia.org)
  • A. belladonna itself (including its variety caucasica) is also present in the Hyrcanian forests and vol. 100 of Flora Iranica includes a useful key with which to distinguish the four species occurring in northern Iran. (wikipedia.org)
  • Certain species are widely known for their medicinal uses, their psychotropic effects, or for being poisonous. (wikipedia.org)
  • homeopathic
  • A small number of Americans have reported instances of health problems that "may" have been caused by a homeopathic medicine, but despite some media claims about homeopathic teething tablets, there has not been to date a single instance in which toxic or dangerous amounts of a medicinal agent were found in these tablets. (mercola.com)
  • herb
  • This is a list of herb, aromatic, medicinal, and bioactive crops that are either currently grown, are recommended alternate crops, are experimental crops, or are not recommended for Indiana. (purdue.edu)
  • Belladonna is a 1-2 meter tall perennial herb that produces small red to black berries. (erowid.org)
  • Although commonly used as a medicinal herb in Ayurvedic medicine, there is no high-quality clinical evidence that it has any biological effect. (wikipedia.org)
  • narcotic
  • One of the plant's common names is dwale , which is thought to derive from the Norse word duale , meaning 'dead sleep' in reference to the narcotic state after taking belladonna. (wordpress.com)
  • coca
  • Cuscohygrine is a pyrrolidine alkaloid found in coca. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cuscohygrine (along with the related metabolite hygrine) was first isolated by Carl Liebermann in 1889 as an alkaloid accompanying cocaine in coca leaves (also known as Cusco-leaves). (wikipedia.org)
  • drug
  • In the United States over the period 1999 to 2012, despite several hundred applications for new drug status, only two botanical drug candidates had sufficient evidence of medicinal value to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration. (wikipedia.org)
  • its drug contains miotic alkaloid. (pharma-board.com)
  • effects
  • The common name belladonna is Italian for 'beautiful lady', because women would use belladonna as an eye drop causing the pupils to occur wider and darker (making use of belladonna's anti-muscarinic effects), which was considered to make them appear more attractive. (wordpress.com)