• nurses
  • The console enabled patients to watch television programs from their beds and it enabled nurses to pipe music to remote stations throughout the hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • care
  • JOB SUMMARY: Performs daily cleaning task in public areas, patient care areas and ancillary patient support areas including offices, exam rooms or other. (simplyhired.com)
  • 1 year (1040 hours) or more of documented previous experience as a Nursing Assistant, Hospital Technician, Emergency Room Technician, patient care transport. (simplyhired.com)
  • Under the direction and supervision of the Home Care Manager, Nurse, and Coordinator, the Geriatric Aide provides direct services to the frail elderly in their. (simplyhired.com)
  • Palm Drive Hospital is the only acute care hospital in western Sonoma County and saves lives because it is close to home - when minutes count. (zoominfo.com)
  • If you're looking for accessible pediatric care, a child-friendly environment, and a responsive team of pediatricians in San Francisco, then look no further. (tacpediatrics.com)
  • We love kids, and our goal is to have a positive impact in the lives of children by providing exceptional health care and compassionate service to the families we serve. (tacpediatrics.com)
  • 1853 French mutual aid society, La Societe Francaise de Bienfaisance Mutuelle, establishes prepaid hospital care plan in San Francisco. (ebri.org)
  • Under direct supervision of licensed staff, Certified Medical Assistants (CMAs) perform a variety of patient care and other services required to treat patients in a health services outpatient or mobile clinic. (calopps.org)
  • Together, St. John's Regional Medical Center and St. John's Pleasant Valley Hospital represent the largest acute-care health organization in Ventura County. (wikipedia.org)
  • I foresee, however, that expanding our scope of practice to include osteoporosis care, for example, will lead orthopaedists to using gimmicky imaging technologies and effectively churning charges for these services to justify the need for more income. (aaos.org)
  • Dignity Health is the official health care provider of the San Francisco Giants. (wikipedia.org)
  • It provides services to minor and major league players and has a clinic at AT&T Park that offers urgent care and physical therapy services to fans and the surrounding community. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a public statement, Bishop Olmsted called the procedure a direct abortion, which is in direct violation of The Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services. (wikipedia.org)
  • They carefully evaluated the patient's situation and correctly applied the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services to it, saving the only life that was possible to save. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition to providing the usual care for base and attached personnel, the hospital serviced personnel passing through the separation center and took care of air evacuation patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • To patients, cost usually represents the amount they have to pay out-of-pocket for health care services. (ama-assn.org)
  • To providers: the expense incurred to deliver health care services to patients. (ama-assn.org)
  • The amount asked by a provider for a health care good or service, which appears on a medical bill. (ama-assn.org)
  • This may be an amount for every service delivered (fee-for-service), for each day in the hospital (per diem), for each episode of hospitalization (e.g., diagnosis-related groups, or DRGs), or for each patient considered to be under their care (capitation). (ama-assn.org)
  • DOMA Technologies' success comes from helping hospitals, physician practices, and other health care providers turn space-eating paper records into paperless digital files for easy access and retrieval. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Our customers are realizing millions of dollars in recovered revenue and savings while improving patient care because of the intelligent and easy to use software we have developed, and the hands-on scanning and document services we provide,' says Ian Checcio, DOMA's Vice President of Sales. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Health systems nationwide are failing to provide the highest quality of care, to bill for millions of dollars in services rendered, or to appeal denied reimbursements because of backlogs of patient charts that had not been forwarded to medical records departments in a timely manner. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Co-chaired by the secretaries of health and human services and labor, the Commission was charged with developing a broader understanding of issues facing the rapidly evolving health care delivery system and building consensus on ways to assure and improve the quality of health care. (unt.edu)
  • In addition, at December 31, 2012, our subsidiaries operated a long-term acute care hospital and owned or leased and operated 30 medical office buildings, all of which were located on, or nearby, our hospital campuses. (dailystocks.com)
  • An acute care, community-owned, non-profit hospital offering medical, surgical, and specialty services to the Chinese Community. (dmoztools.net)
  • A full-service, acute care facility located in western Orange County. (dmoztools.net)
  • 1947
  • Excavation work for the 150-bed Station Hospital was started on 17 March 1947 after many revisions of plans. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the transition to separate the Air Force from the U.S. Army began in 1947, all Station Hospital personnel were assigned to the newly designated 8th Medical Group (provisional). (wikipedia.org)
  • Following the end of World War II and the establishment of the U.S. Air Force as a separate service in 1947, the installation was renamed Fairfield-Suisun Air Force Base. (wikipedia.org)
  • personnel
  • Stone's talents as physician and administrator became apparent since there were little or no over-exposures or radiation injuries, with numerous research and ancillary personnel involved in developing the techniques and procedures of the atomic age. (wikipedia.org)
  • It consisted of two squadrons: the 81st Medical Squadron (provisional), composed of all medical department duty personnel, and the 82nd Medical Squadron (provisional), composed entirely of hospital patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • The base is also host to David Grant USAF Medical Center, a 265-bed, $200 million Air Force teaching hospital, which serves both in-service and retired military personnel. (wikipedia.org)
  • successfully
  • Inova Mount Vernon Hospital in Alexandria, VA, one of five hospitals in the Inova Health System, has successfully utilized the eDOMA web based technology to facilitate their home based Coding function. (bio-medicine.org)
  • mental illness
  • Dr. Childs has an extensive background in providing services to people with serious mental illness, which includes both the private and public sectors. (unt.edu)
  • provide
  • In the 1870s, for example, railroad, mining, and other industries began to provide the services of company doctors to workers. (ebri.org)
  • 1929 A group of schoolteachers arranges for Baylor Hospital in Dallas, TX, to provide room, board, and specified services at a predetermined monthly cost. (ebri.org)
  • With respect to business process services, we provide comprehensive operational management for revenue cycle functions, including patient access, health information management, revenue integrity and patient financial services. (dailystocks.com)
  • Sisters
  • She wanted her service to the poor to endure, so she founded the Sisters of Mercy in 1831. (wikipedia.org)
  • The sisters collaborated with Oxnard's community of ranchers, farmers, doctors and business leaders to make the dream of a hospital a reality. (wikipedia.org)
  • Area
  • Situated in the San Francisco Bay Area and known as the "Gateway to the Pacific", Travis Air Force Base handles more cargo and passenger traffic through its airport than any other military air terminal in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • Catholic
  • Roman Catholic Blog: George Niederauer's Last Hurrah = the Death of Catholic Hospitals? (typepad.com)
  • George Niederauer's Last Hurrah = the Death of Catholic Hospitals? (typepad.com)
  • I used to think that when his tenure as Archbishop of San Francisco ended this year, that the greatest harm done to the Roman Catholic Church by George Niederauer would have been caused by his years as Rector at St. John's Seminary in Camarillo. (typepad.com)
  • Fifteen of its 40 hospitals are non-Catholic, a number likely to increase as the network expands. (typepad.com)
  • While the changes were made in consultation with the Catholic Church and approved by San Francisco Archbishop George Niederauer(above) , the Catholic affiliation has in the past been an obstacle to making deals with potential partners. (typepad.com)
  • One thing that will not change: some of the services that are off-limits to both Catholic and non-Catholic facilities in the network. (typepad.com)
  • year
  • Andersen Consulting was paying Arthur Andersen up to 15% of its profits each year (a provision of the 1989 split was that the more profitable unit - whether AA or AC - pay the other the 15 percent), while at the same time Arthur Andersen was competing with Andersen Consulting through its own newly established business consulting service line called Arthur Andersen Business Consulting (AABC). (wikipedia.org)
  • That same year he began service as a public prosecutor in San Diego County, enforcing state law as a deputy district attorney until 1981, specializing in white collar crime. (wikipedia.org)
  • public
  • the value of teaching programs to a public hospital was emphasized by the university in their negotiations with the city. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ASI's Omega Project (1981-83), led by Peter Young, produced a series of 19 papers shadowing each Department of State, and advocated such things as the compulsory contracting-out of most local services such as refuse collection, the replacement of much of the welfare state by private insurance, and further privatisation of public sector services and industries, including aspects of police services. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1919, the New York Public Service Commission launched a study at the behest of engineer Daniel L. Turner to determine what improvements were needed in the city's public transport system. (wikipedia.org)
  • built
  • It will be the only hospital in San Francisco built with a base-isolated foundation, the latest technology for protecting buildings during seismic activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • The original six-room hospital was built by Oxnard pioneers John Borchard, J.A. Driffill, C.J. Elliott, Charles Donlon, W.H. Lathrop, L. Lehmann, and A. Levy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Originally completed in 1522, through the initiative of Friar Pedro da Atouguia, the Convent of São Francisco (Portuguese: Convento de São Francisco) was originally built on a site called Pedras dos Frades (along the coastal boulevard where a compass rose was constructed in the 20th Century). (wikipedia.org)
  • support
  • In addition, our management services offerings have expanded to support value-based performance through clinical integration, financial risk management and population health management. (dailystocks.com)
  • beds
  • John Borchard, a rancher, along with his family, donated 9 acres (3.6 ha) of land for the hospital site and $20,000 for the perpetual endowment of two hospital beds for the poor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Decades later in 1952, as a booming post-war population in Oxnard made it necessary to build a larger hospital, a two-story building with 75 patient beds was opened and dedicated by Cardinal James Francis McIntyre. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hospital buildings were of cantonment-type construction, housing seven wards with a total capacity of 125 beds. (wikipedia.org)
  • The designs for the Aerial Debarkation Hospital called for seven wards, six of 100 beds. (wikipedia.org)
  • A two-story Base Hospital would consist of four wards with a capacity of 150 beds. (wikipedia.org)
  • office
  • Our caring team is committed to providing quality service in a comfortable, safe office setting where children and parents can feel at ease. (tacpediatrics.com)
  • addition
  • During the next 35 years, as community need grew, St. John's continued to expand the facility with the addition of two floors and ancillary areas. (wikipedia.org)
  • operations
  • For financial reporting purposes, our business lines are classified into two separate reportable business segments - hospital operations and other, and Conifer. (dailystocks.com)
  • Five
  • Of those hospitals, 44 were owned by our subsidiaries and five were owned by third parties and leased by our subsidiaries. (dailystocks.com)
  • areas
  • 1910s Physician service and industrial health plans established in the Northwest and remote areas. (ebri.org)
  • study
  • If there is a case of NSF, the second part of the study is to perform an ancillary study to evaluate risk factors in NSF-affected patients," Amet said, and if not, no further data were to be collected. (auntminnie.com)
  • access
  • Despite a national mandate for access to interpreter services in settings receiving federal funds [ 17 ], under-use of interpreters persists [ 18 - 25 ]. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • saves
  • So when you develop a product that improves productivity, enhances the bottom line, saves a natural resource and allows professionals to work from home while focusing on their core services, how can anyone lose? (bio-medicine.org)
  • offer
  • Community members raised concerns about the possible takeover, pointing to restrictions in Dignity's Statement of Common Values that might mean that the hospital would no longer offer abortion services, or euthanasia services under the Oregon Death with Dignity law. (wikipedia.org)
  • community
  • As Oxnard's population continued to rapidly grow, community leaders and hospital administrators recognized that a larger and more centrally located facility was necessary. (wikipedia.org)
  • Information on community services for behavioral health and substance abuse treatment, health information and important telephone numbers. (dmoztools.net)
  • A not-for-profit community hospital. (dmoztools.net)