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  • Hippocratic
  • In particular, he is credited with greatly advancing the systematic study of clinical medicine, summing up the medical knowledge of previous schools, and prescribing practices for physicians through the Hippocratic Oath and other works.Hippocrates is credited with being the first physician to reject superstitions, legends and beliefs that credited supernatural or divine forces with causing illness. (cnet.com)
  • Indeed there is not a single mention of a mystical illness in the entirety of the Hippocratic Corpus.Ancient Greek schools of medicine were split (into the Knidian and Koan) on how to deal with disease. (cnet.com)
  • The Hippocratic Corpus contains textbooks, lectures, research, notes and philosophical essays on various subjects in medicine, in no particular order.The Hippocratic Oath is probably the most famous document of the Hippocratic Corpus. (cnet.com)
  • Based on Hippocratic medicine, it was believed that the four humors were to be in balanced proportions with regard to amount and strength of each humor for a body to be healthy. (wikipedia.org)
  • The four humors of Hippocratic medicine are black bile (Greek: μέλαινα χολή, melaina chole), yellow bile (Greek: κίτρινη χολή, kitrini chole), phlegm (Greek: φλέγμα, phlegma), and blood (Greek: αἷμα, haima), and each corresponds to one of the traditional four temperaments. (wikipedia.org)
  • He is sometimes referred to as the "Father of Medicine" in recognition of his lasting contributions to the field as the founder of the Hippocratic School of Medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • He is also credited with greatly advancing the systematic study of clinical medicine, summing up the medical knowledge of previous schools, and prescribing practices for physicians through the Hippocratic Corpus and other works. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hippocratic medicine and its philosophy are far removed from that of modern medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • sociology of medic
  • The sociology of medicine limits its concern to the patient-practitioner relationship and the role of health professionals in society. (wikipedia.org)
  • Renée Fox's major teaching and research interests - sociology of medicine, medical research, medical education, and medical ethics - have involved her in first-hand, participant observation-based studies in Continental Europe (particularly in Belgium), in Central Africa (especially in the Democratic Republic of Congo), and in the People's Republic of China, as well as in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • beliefs
  • Whether exploring and interpreting the impact of diverse Protestant theologies and beliefs upon the universities, the parishes, or the popular mentalité, historians of religion have become comfortable with exploring the nature, meaning and function of 'religion' in early modern historiography. (history.ac.uk)
  • Another strategy has concentrated upon 'popular' religion, the beliefs and activities of the common people performed in the parish or the environment of the family. (history.ac.uk)
  • Sociologists have demonstrated that the spread of diseases is heavily influenced by the socioeconomic status of individuals, ethnic traditions or beliefs, and other cultural factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the main linking factors for Love Medicine is religion, a hybrid of the naturalistic Ojibwa beliefs and practices, and the Catholic "missionary" religion lived by her reservation characters that promotes good living and embraces life in all its splendor and warts. (wordpress.com)
  • On one level, Love Medicine is about religion, about the shared beliefs and differences in the Ojibwe naturalistic religion and the Catholic religion, a unique mix of the very human and the very spiritual and sometimes very Catholic practices and beliefs. (wordpress.com)
  • It is not too much of a stretch to imagine Plains Indians hearing of the loving nature of Jesus from Catholic Missionaries, then blending beliefs of Jesus with their own naturalistic religion, and calling this new hybrid religion "love medicine. (wordpress.com)
  • Erdrich could be expressing her own religious beliefs in and through Love Medicine, setting it up as a kind of "Erdrich bible" in which, as Thomas Jefferson did in his "Jefferson bible," she crosses out the parts of Catholicism she doesn't like or agree with, and adds heaping portions of Ojibwe beliefs she feels strongly about. (wordpress.com)
  • It would have been easy for Erdrich to project her own beliefs on Love Medicine's characters and promote a blend of the best of Ojibwe and Catholic religions in their lives. (wordpress.com)
  • If religion is indeed one of the threads that tie the story collection together, and a Catholic version of Christian religion as interpreted by the Ojibwe and combined with their own beliefs at that, the story needs a sacrificial lamb and a savior. (wordpress.com)
  • This includes the view that disease is a mental error rather than physical disorder, and that the sick should be treated not by medicine, but by a form of prayer that seeks to correct the beliefs responsible for the illusion of ill health. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1975
  • Over the last decade the histories of religion and of medicine in the early modern period have developed a more conceptually robust demeanour embracing the achievements and examples of works like Keith Thomas' Religion and the Decline of Magic (1971) and Charles Webster's The Great Instauration (1975). (history.ac.uk)
  • 1994
  • citation needed] Jopling and Ridley were jointly awarded the Sir Rickard Christophers Medal by the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene in 1994. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1936
  • He received his undergraduate degree from Amherst College in 1936, and his M.D. from Cornell College of Medicine in 1941. (dartmouth.edu)
  • Christian Science became the fastest growing religion in the United States, with nearly 270,000 members by 1936, a figure that had declined by 1990 to just over 100,000. (wikipedia.org)
  • He graduated from London University (St. Barthlomew's Hospital) in 1936 and he studied medicine and obstetrics, as an intern, ending as a ship doctor traveling to Far East. (wikipedia.org)
  • Physical
  • Predictors of membership in classes with substantial CAM use included younger age, more education, higher income, Jewish religion, ideal body mass index, higher fruit and vegetable intake, higher levels of physical activity, receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy, and prior use of oral contraceptives. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Moreover, it resembled a holistic approach to medicine as the link between mental and physical processes were emphasized by this framework. (wikipedia.org)
  • These factors include reduced physical activity levels and excess dietary sodium intake from foods. (wikipedia.org)
  • health
  • Doctors that follow this form of "Christian medicine" typically endorse the apparent health benefits of prayer and fasting, advocated by the Church, while sharing the Church's view of abortion, contraception and homosexuality as grave sins. (balkaninsight.com)
  • Humorism , or humoralism , was a system of medicine detailing the makeup and workings of the human body, adopted by Ancient Greek and Roman physicians and philosophers , positing that an excess or deficiency of any of four distinct bodily fluids in a person-known as humors or humours -directly influences their temperament and health. (wikipedia.org)
  • While it is apparent that the United States exhibits a greater Western approach to health care than Eastern medicine, the health care practices in the Philippines reflect both traditional medicine as well as Western medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • In reference to the different healthcare approaches of the United States and the Philippines, it is evident that both healthcare strategies and indirect factors are reflected in the health lifestyle of Filipino Americans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Socio-cultural factors such as established medical systems, religion, and superstitious belief are influential indirect factors of Filipino American health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Christian
  • For some historians 'religion' is to be most readily identified with a traditional understanding of Christian faith: a complex admixture of doctrinal, ceremonial, liturgical and pastoral propositions and activities. (history.ac.uk)
  • and there are allusions to Western religious dogma and images throughout Love Medicine - most notably to "the dark one" and to fish/fishing, the original Christian symbol/icon, inherent in the water metaphor. (wordpress.com)
  • The church does not require that Christian Scientists avoid all medical care-adherents use dentists, optometrists, obstetricians, physicians for broken bones, and vaccination when required by law-but maintains that Christian-Science prayer is most effective when not combined with medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most significantly, she dismissed the material world as an illusion, rather than as merely subordinate to Mind, leading her to reject the use of medicine, or materia medica, and making Christian Science the most controversial of the metaphysical groups. (wikipedia.org)
  • Christian Science leaders place their religion within mainstream Christian teaching, according to J. Gordon Melton, and reject any identification with the New Thought movement. (wikipedia.org)
  • By the third century, the Christian church was responsible for almost all charity, including charity in the field of medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • spirits
  • Although the Aborigines believed in spirits and medicine men, they also used more practical methods like herbs and plants to treat some sickness. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • The Bori religion is both an institution to control these forces, and the performance of an "adoricism" (as opposed to exorcism) ritual, dance and music by which these spirits are controlled and by which illness is healed. (wikipedia.org)
  • processes
  • Religion' to a Christopher Haigh or a John Morrill, or a Jonathon Clark or a Christopher Hill, may invoke very different, contradictory and perhaps radically incommensurable understandings of ecclesiastical institutions, patterns of belief, articulations of meaning, processes of communal identity, or discourses of legitimation. (history.ac.uk)
  • Exploiting sources such as Churchwardens accounts, probate inventories and even material artefacts historians have attempted to reconstruct the patterns and processes of the religion of everyday life. (history.ac.uk)
  • physician
  • They promoted the link between spiritual healing and actual medicine, best exemplified by the ever-present Christus medicus in these medical institutions, an artistic representation of Jesus as a physician. (wikipedia.org)
  • spiritual
  • Included are research papers and notes on heart disease, religion and medicine, the spiritual factors in healing, and psychosomatic illness as well as personal and professional correspondence. (dartmouth.edu)
  • Also included are personal and professional correspondence, as well as case studies, documenting his work in and research of cardiac illnesses, psychosomatic illnesses and spiritual factors in healing. (dartmouth.edu)
  • These early hospital-like institutions were deeply religions spaces, closely linked to the church, and their main focus was general care for the poor - food and shelter - along with spiritual treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • form
  • 1 form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Muslim scholars of the early 19th century disapproved of the hybrid religion practised in royal courts, overzealous Muslims were to use this hybridization as an excuse to overthrow the Sultanates and form the Sokoto Caliphate. (wikipedia.org)
  • dietary
  • Disease could also be the result of the "corruption" of one or more of the humors, which could be caused by environmental circumstances, dietary changes, or many other factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • society
  • If the anthropological tradition was interested in exploring (very crudely) the meaning that religion had for early modern society, those who emphasized the political dimensions of religion ultimately stressed the connections between religion and power. (history.ac.uk)
  • From his account it is shown how factors outside the disease itself can affect society. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this essay, she describes Belgium as particularistic due to society being divided into groups of social class, religion, political affiliation, language, and region one lives. (wikipedia.org)
  • research
  • Where medical research might gather statistics on a disease, a sociological perspective on an illness would provide insight on what external factors caused the demographics who contracted the disease to become ill. (wikipedia.org)
  • modern
  • As a visiting professor, she taught courses and delivered a lecture series entitled, "Life, Death, and Modern Medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • approach
  • That is to say that on top of the rather diluted anthropological approach to the function of religion within parish communities derived from the exemplar of Thomas' work, a sort of political sociology has been grafted. (history.ac.uk)
  • traditions
  • An aspect of the traditional Maguzawa Hausa religious traditions, Bori became a state religion led by ruling-class priestesses among some of the late pre-colonial Hausa states. (wikipedia.org)
  • cultural factors
  • The only difference between humans and the rest of life is, I suspect, the sophistication and effectiveness of human non-genetic cultural factors (discussed in more detail later). (wikia.com)
  • effective
  • Experimental medicines of effective php and same partners have been reported in cytotec labor delivery patients receiving medication and dozom species of the situations in the face investment. (getupradio.com)
  • studies
  • In August 1947 he returned to London with his family at age 36 and took postgraduate studies, specializing in tropical medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • changes
  • Paris Medicine is a term defining the series of changes to the hospital and care received with a hospital that occurred during the period of the French Revolution. (wikipedia.org)
  • identity
  • This "seeking" for identity and religion are portrayed most prominently through two central characters, June Kashpaw and Lipsha Morrissey Kashpaw. (wordpress.com)
  • Although the meaning of identity differs from one individual to another, the fundamental factors are the same. (wikipedia.org)
  • different
  • People of different languages, religions, castes and classes had to amalgamate themselves to create a new community, which, on the one hand, must have retained features of Indian social life, while at the same time they do not represent any specific culture area. (isbs.com)
  • DNA sequences between mitochondria within a single cell are vastly different, found researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. (medical-hotspot.com)
  • Indian
  • The Indian diaspora in the West has popularised many aspects of Hindu philosophy such as yoga, meditation, Ayurvedic medicine, divination, karma, and reincarnation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The influence of Indian religions has been significant all over the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • Evidence attesting to prehistoric religion in the Indian "subcontinent" derives from scattered Mesolithic rock paintings depicting dances and rituals. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was only towards the end of the 18th century that European merchants and colonists began to refer to the followers of Indian religions collectively as Hindus. (wikipedia.org)
  • among
  • For example, there is evidence among populations where lifespan is truncated by disease that factors associated with a midlife crisis may occur much earlier in life. (encyclopedia.com)
  • They began wandering the Thai countryside out of their desire to practice monasticism according to the normative standards of Classical Buddhism (which Ajahn Mun termed "the customs of the noble ones") during a time when folk religion was observed predominately among Theravada village monastic factions in the Siamese region. (wikipedia.org)
  • Among the earliest known records of 'Hindu' with connotations of religion may be in the 7th-century CE Chinese text Record of the Western Regions by Xuanzang, and 14th-century Persian text Futuhu's-salatin by 'Abd al-Malik Isami. (wikipedia.org)
  • disease
  • In the December featured basic science article in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, Belgian researchers report on the first large-scale longitudinal imaging study to evaluate BACE1 inhibition with micro-PET in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. (medical-hotspot.com)
  • In a comprehensive analysis of samples from 107 aged human brains, researchers at the Allen Institute for Brain Science, UW Medicine and Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute have discovered details that will help researchers better understand the biological bases for Alzheimer's disease and dementia in older populations. (medical-hotspot.com)