• host's
  • Linked with this is the question of aim of application of these immunological tests in animal schistosomiasis-whether positive cases should be treated against schistosomiasis and whether positive cases indicate excretion of schistosome eggs in host's excreta. (springer.com)
  • Feeding by adult flies on the blood of their hosts exposes the hosts to pathogenic organisms that are infecting the fly, this can lead to acute disease of the host's blood and other organs. (wikipedia.org)
  • These apply to parasites whose hosts are plants as well as animals: Parasitic castrators feed on their host's reproductive tissues, leaving other bodily processes largely intact, and therefore ensuring the host's survival and the freedom of the parasite to remain in the host body for as long as the host continues to live. (wikipedia.org)
  • larvae
  • The disease (called Toxocariasis) caused by migrating T. canis larvae (toxocariasis) results in two syndromes: visceralis larva migrans and ocularis larva migrans. (wikipedia.org)
  • L2 larvae may also be ingested by a variety of animals like mice or rabbits, where they stay in a dormant stage inside the animals' tissue until the intermediate host has been eaten by a dog, where subsequent development is confined to the gastrointestinal tract. (wikipedia.org)
  • Life-cycle is a complete metamorphosis with larvae that are non-parasitic, living in environments such as pools of water, soil, streams. (wikipedia.org)
  • wildlife
  • Studies from the newly dedicated Karen C. Drayer Wildlife Health Center discovered the presence of brucellosis in harbor seals and the H1N1 flu strain in elephant seals, increasing the understanding of One Health issues among human, animals and the environment. (ucdavis.edu)
  • centre
  • Regional Centre has been established under the able guidance of Worthy Vice-Chancellor, Major Gen. (Dr) Shri Kant Sharma SM, VSM (Retd), LUVAS recently in year 2014 by upgrading the Veterinary Unit Substation TVCC which was created by merging Parasitological Research Station, Disease Investigation Laboratory and TVCC sub centre of erstwhile CCS, HAU, Hisar in June 2004. (edu.in)
  • Nonhuman
  • Other veterinarians work at federal agencies, such as the National Institutes of Health or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, where they deal with the implications of diseases affecting human health that originate in nonhuman primates. (avma.org)
  • The AVMA fully supports animal health professionals who work with nonhuman primates in conservation and biomedical research efforts. (avma.org)
  • The data support this belief: according to the Captive Wild Animal Protection Coalition, 1 more than 80% of health and behavioral issues with nonhuman primates arise from those that are kept as pets. (avma.org)
  • Because nonhuman primates pose significant risks to the health of the public and domestic animals - including the possibility of severe injury to the humans and domestic animals with which they come in contact - the AVMA opposes private ownership of these animals. (avma.org)
  • Furthermore, the AVMA also does not support the use of nonhuman primates as assistance or service animals because of animal welfare concerns, the potential for serious injury, and zoonotic risks. (avma.org)
  • The risks posed to and by nonhuman primates maintained by private individuals fall into four broad categories: inadequate husbandry, physical injury to humans and other domestic animals, disease transmission, and ecosystem concerns. (avma.org)
  • Precise numbers are difficult to elucidate, but Born Free USA and the Captive Wild Animal Protection Coalition estimate 4 that more than 15,000 nonhuman primates are owned by private individuals in the United States today. (avma.org)
  • Privately owned nonhuman primates have attacked humans and other animals, and they have escaped from their cages to roam freely in communities. (avma.org)
  • Nonhuman primates are highly intelligent and social animals that present unique husbandry challenges. (avma.org)
  • 6 If multiple nonhuman primates are kept, consideration must be given to providing sufficient numbers of food and water stations, an adequate number and appropriate type of nest boxes, and visual barriers that prevent direct eye contact with dominant animals. (avma.org)
  • In nonhuman animals, Babesia canis rossi, Babesia bigemina, and Babesia bovis cause particularly severe forms of the disease, including a severe haemolytic anaemia, with positive erythrocyte-in-saline-agglutination test indicating an immune-mediated component to the haemolysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • viral
  • In contrast, immunodiagnosis has played a pivotal role in viral and bacterial diseases, owing to its ability to reflect immune status of the host and for undertaking vaccination program with available vaccines. (springer.com)
  • hosts
  • Found worldwide, T. gondii is capable of infecting virtually all warm-blooded animals, but felids such as domestic cats are the only known definitive hosts in which the parasite can undergo sexual reproduction. (wikipedia.org)
  • zoonotic
  • Ahluwalia SS (1968) Studies on host parasite relationship and control of Schistosoma incognitum infection of domestic pig with observations on the zoonotic potentialities of the parasite. (springer.com)
  • 3 Risks of human injury and zoonotic disease are often greatest in the very populations such animals serve. (avma.org)
  • mammals
  • After trypanosomes, Babesia is thought to be the second-most common blood parasite of mammals, and they can have a major impact on health of domestic animals in areas without severe winters. (wikipedia.org)
  • important
  • The mite plays an important part in the disease, however, by preparing the ground for the invasion of the bacterium by dilating the follicles and sweat-glands, and possibly also carries and introduces the germ. (wikipedia.org)
  • welfare
  • I am Dr. Gail Golab, Director of the American Veterinary Medical Association's Animal Welfare Division. (avma.org)
  • AVMA policy, based on considerable research and deliberation, supports limiting or prohibiting private ownership of indigenous and non-native wild animals that pose a substantial risk to public health, domestic animal health, or the ecosystem, or whose welfare is unacceptably compromised. (avma.org)
  • A three-day Donkey Welfare Symposium held at the school drew people from around the globe to learn more about the health and welfare of the world's leading working animal. (ucdavis.edu)
  • birds
  • The lifecycle of T. gondii can be broadly summarized into two components: a sexual component that occurs only within cats (felids, wild or domestic), and an asexual component that can occur within virtually all warm-blooded animals, including humans, cats, and birds. (wikipedia.org)
  • eaten
  • When this animal is eaten by a predator, the parasite survives the digestion process and matures into an adult. (wikipedia.org)
  • organs
  • Macroscopic anatomy of organs and organ systems emphasizing structural and functional relationships, and their contribution to homeostatis of domestic animals. (unl.edu)
  • health
  • however, adults often reside in the pulmonary arterial system (lung arteries), as well as the heart, and a major effect on the health for the animal is a manifestation of damage to the lung vessels and tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Application of these concepts and selected examples to current and controversial issues in animal production and care, regulatory concerns, legal and ethical decisions, human and animal health hazards, food safety, and environmental contamination. (unl.edu)
  • In and about endemic regions filarial diseases have been public health concerns for as long as we can tell. (wikipedia.org)
  • host
  • Heartworm infection may result in serious disease for the host, with death typically as the result of congestive heart failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Heartworms go throughout several life stages before they become adults infecting the pulmonary artery of the host animal. (wikipedia.org)
  • Immunodiagnosis is an indirect way of diagnosing the disease by detecting not the parasitic stages but footprints of the infection in the form of presence of antibodies or antigens either in the host or in its excretions. (springer.com)
  • contribution
  • A significant contribution to the northward spread of Bluetongue disease has been the ability of Culicoides obsoletus and C.pulicaris to acquire and transmit the pathogen, both of which are spread widely throughout Europe. (wikipedia.org)
  • human
  • Human babesiosis is an uncommon but emerging disease in the Northeastern and Midwestern United States and parts of Europe, and sporadic throughout the rest of the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • wild animals
  • 2 The AVMA thereby supports related regulatory efforts to limit or prohibit private ownership, and importation for the purpose of private ownership, of such indigenous and non-native wild animals. (avma.org)
  • public
  • The Yeerongpilly site was more suitable than other sites considered as it was bounded on the north by the river, on the south by the railway line, leaving only narrow frontages on the east and west to adjoining land and public roads, thereby reducing the danger that disease could spread. (wikipedia.org)
  • develop
  • Some animals also develop foot lesions, beginning with coronitis, with consequent lameness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Not all animals develop signs, but all those that do lose condition rapidly, and the sickest die within a week. (wikipedia.org)
  • help
  • The Koret Shelter Medicine Program developed the UC Davis Virtual Consultant, a free online self-evaluation tool for shelter staff, veterinarians, and volunteers world-wide to help improve the well-being of shelter animals. (ucdavis.edu)