• repetitive
  • Another area of research at McGill University uses electromyographic, kinematic and kinetic approaches to study the influence of various pathologies such as whiplash injuries and repetitive motion disorders on posture and movement, with applications towards rehabilitation and occupational health and the study musculoskeletal disorders associated with the workplace. (mcgill.ca)
  • shoulder
  • The "missing link" of whiplash may be towards or inside the shoulder and this would explain why neck therapy alone frequently does not give lasting relief. (wikipedia.org)
  • Whiplash due to The Referred Shoulder Impingement Syndrome was successfully treated using conventional treatments for shoulder impingement including anti inflammatory steroids and non steroids, and by avoiding the overhead position of shoulder impingement during the day and night time. (wikipedia.org)
  • psychological
  • Psychological injury" refers to psychological or psychiatric conditions associated with an event that leads, or may lead, to a lawsuit in tort action or other legal-related claims, for example, in workers' compensation, United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) disability benefits claims, and Social Security Administration (SSA) disability cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • The psychological injury must reach a degree of disturbance of the pre-existing psychological/ psychiatric state such that it interferes in some significant way with the individual's ability to function. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research and practice in the scientific field of psychological injury are predictably and intimately associated with legal research and practice. (wikipedia.org)
  • This association between psychological injury and law began to be recognized as a distinct scholarly and professional entity in the first decade of this century, in particular, as the result of the development of the first scientific society, the Association for the Scientific Advancement of Psychological Injury and Law (ASAPIL), and the first peer-reviewed academic journal devoted exclusively to the topic, Psychological Injury and Law. (wikipedia.org)
  • Note that psychological injury, as presently defined, is treated in court uniquely in civil cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this sense, although the area of psychological injury and law is related to forensic psychology, it does not relate to the criminal component of this area. (wikipedia.org)
  • Matters important to forensic psychology, such as adopting the correct procedures in practice, being an expert witness, and understanding the relationship of psychology and court, are also essential to practice in the area of psychological injury and law. (wikipedia.org)
  • Generally, malingerers complain of psychological disorders such as anxiety. (wikipedia.org)
  • Disease
  • by the U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (wikipedia.org)
  • road accidents
  • Despite the hype, road accidents involving personal injury have fallen since the mid -1990s. (csp.org.uk)
  • In 2009, for example, the number of road accidents involving personal injury fell by almost one third compared to the average for the years from 1994 to 1998. (csp.org.uk)
  • Approximately
  • and according to the World Health Organisation (WHO), traffic injuries constitute approximately 1% of the combined gross national products of the nations of the western world. (docplayer.net)
  • typically
  • The word "whiplash" is a layperson's term -- and although it is typically associated with Car Crashes, crashes are certainly not the only way to get a whiplash injury. (personalinjurydoctorgroup.com)
  • Temporomandibular disorders typically are multifactorial in origin, but most are related to problems with muscles and ligaments of the temporomandibular joints or internal derangements within the joints themselves. (merckmanuals.com)
  • tumors
  • Congenital causes include hydrocephalus, craniosynostosis (especially of the lambdoid suture), hyperostosis (such as craniometaphyseal dysplasia, osteopetrosis, erythroid hyperplasia), X-linked vitamin D-resistant rickets, and neurofibromatosis type I. Acquired disorders include space occupying lesions due to one of several potential causes ranging from brain tumors to hematomas. (wikipedia.org)
  • sharply
  • Some drivers brake sharply to cause accidents, while a number 'exaggerate their injury' - whether consciously or unconsciously - in order to gain attention from their families and friends, or even for financial gain. (csp.org.uk)
  • The number of whiplash injuries has since risen sharply due to rear-end motor vehicle collisions. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • Other research focuses on the pathophysiology of skeletal muscle mitochondrial disorders and the safety and efficacy of exercise training in their treatment. (mcgill.ca)
  • I personally tried to introduce acupuncture when I was working in ED 2 years ago, but was denied, as the Trust would not provide cover for my practice there and was strongly against its use in ED. Until that becomes possible, a thorough research into the treatment of whiplash injury with acupuncture is always going to be difficult to achieve. (bmj.com)
  • These findings indicate that classifying these subjects into subgroups based on disability levels makes it possible to optimize the management and treatment after whiplash injury. (beds.ac.uk)
  • There is not enough evidence to suggest that spinal manipulation is an effective long-term treatment for whiplash although there are short term benefits. (wikipedia.org)
  • syndrome
  • The association between traumatic shaking, subdural hematoma and retinal hemorrhages was described in 1972 and referred to as whiplash shaken infant syndrome. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • Insurance companies are reeling from the number of claims being made by people who say they have whiplash injuries. (csp.org.uk)
  • Last month the House of Commons transport committee blamed the spiralling cost of motor premiums on insurers, solicitors and claims management companies that encourage people caught up in road traffic accidents to make personal injury claims. (csp.org.uk)
  • However my experience suggests that there is a good percentage of people who really do suffer following whiplash injury,' he notes. (csp.org.uk)
  • Most fraudulent claims arise from intermediary 'no-win no-fee' companies which, in some cases, pressure people into exaggerating their injuries in their claims, he says. (csp.org.uk)
  • In the United Kingdom, 430,000 people made an insurance claim for whiplash in 2007, accounting for 14% of every driver's premium. (wikipedia.org)
  • Soon a group of people started coming forward who claimed that they had been injured in train crashes, but had no obvious evidence of injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • sports injuries
  • Whiplash may be caused by any motion similar to a rear-end collision in a motor vehicle, such as may take place on a roller coaster or other rides at an amusement park, sports injuries such as skiing accidents, other modes of transportation such as airplane travel, or from being hit, kicked or shaken. (wikipedia.org)
  • result
  • The impact may result in bony or soft tissue injury. (arvojournals.org)
  • They also happen as a result of a sports injury, particularly during contact sports. (rochester.edu)
  • Claimable injuries might result from events such as a motor vehicular collision or other negligent action, and cause impairments, disorders, and disabilities perhaps as an exacerbation of a pre-existing condition (e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1971, Guthkelch, a neurosurgeon, hypothesized that such shaking can result in a subdural hematoma, in the absence of any detectable external signs of injury to the skull. (wikipedia.org)