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  • sports injuries
  • Some of the most common causes of WAD that I see in my office include sports injuries, work injuries (think logging here), spousal abuse, fights, horse accidents (falls), and almost anything else that has the capacity to "snap" your head suddenly and violently. (dralexjimenez.com)
  • Whiplash may be caused by any motion similar to a rear-end collision in a motor vehicle, such as may take place on a roller coaster or other rides at an amusement park, sports injuries such as skiing accidents, other modes of transportation such as airplane travel, or from being hit, kicked or shaken. (wikipedia.org)
  • deafness
  • by the U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • These disorders have also been theorized to be caused by centrally mediated sensitivity to pain, and furthermore they often occur together. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many whiplash injuries occur when you are involved in a rear-end automobile collision. (rochester.edu)
  • The most widely accepted pathophysiological mechanism by which Chiari type I malformations occur is by a reduction or lack of development of the posterior fossa as a result of congenital or acquired disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • prognosis
  • Our current Whiplash topic continues from last month when we reviewed the "mechanism of injury," the "type of injury," and "prognosis. (executiveexpresschiro.com)
  • The type and length of treatment will vary based on the degree of injury (see last month's "prognosis" discussion), the initial response to care (improvement vs. worsening), the compliance of the patient in modifying their activities, performing home-based care (ice, rest, exercise, etc.), and the patient's motivation to get better. (executiveexpresschiro.com)
  • musculoskeletal
  • TMD has been considered as a type of musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, or rheumatological disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • In turn, the term temporomandibular disorder is described as "a clinical term [referring to] musculoskeletal disorders affecting the temporomandibular joints and their associated musculature. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another area of research at McGill University uses electromyographic, kinematic and kinetic approaches to study the influence of various pathologies such as whiplash injuries and repetitive motion disorders on posture and movement, with applications towards rehabilitation and occupational health and the study musculoskeletal disorders associated with the workplace. (mcgill.ca)
  • symptomatic
  • Temporomandibular disorder is a term that creates confusion since it refers to a group of similarly symptomatic conditions, whilst many sources use the term temporomandibular disorders as a vague description rather than a specific syndrome, and refer to any condition which may affect the temporomandibular joints (see table). (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Additionally, ectopia may be present but asymptomatic until whiplash causes it to become symptomatic. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • citation needed] The hallucinatory experiences differ from that commonly experienced in psychotic disorders although there may be some overlap. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1998
  • In 2009, for example, the number of road accidents involving personal injury fell by almost one third compared to the average for the years from 1994 to 1998. (csp.org.uk)
  • Scientific
  • Scientific monograph of the Quebec Task Force on Whiplash-Associated Disorders: redefining "whiplash" and its management. (chiroaccess.com)
  • Research and practice in the scientific field of psychological injury are predictably and intimately associated with legal research and practice. (wikipedia.org)
  • This association between psychological injury and law began to be recognized as a distinct scholarly and professional entity in the first decade of this century, in particular, as the result of the development of the first scientific society, the Association for the Scientific Advancement of Psychological Injury and Law (ASAPIL), and the first peer-reviewed academic journal devoted exclusively to the topic, Psychological Injury and Law. (wikipedia.org)
  • impairment
  • Legally, psychological injury is considered a mental harm, suffering, damage, impairment, or dysfunction caused to a person as a direct result of some action or failure to act by some individual. (wikipedia.org)
  • accidents
  • Last month the House of Commons transport committee blamed the spiralling cost of motor premiums on insurers, solicitors and claims management companies that encourage people caught up in road traffic accidents to make personal injury claims. (csp.org.uk)
  • He said that 'referral fees' - in which insurance companies are paid by personal injury lawyers to refer clients who have been involved in accidents - should be banned. (csp.org.uk)
  • Despite the hype, road accidents involving personal injury have fallen since the mid -1990s. (csp.org.uk)
  • Some drivers brake sharply to cause accidents, while a number 'exaggerate their injury' - whether consciously or unconsciously - in order to gain attention from their families and friends, or even for financial gain. (csp.org.uk)
  • Psychiatric
  • Psychological injury" refers to psychological or psychiatric conditions associated with an event that leads, or may lead, to a lawsuit in tort action or other legal-related claims, for example, in workers' compensation, United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) disability benefits claims, and Social Security Administration (SSA) disability cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • The psychological injury must reach a degree of disturbance of the pre-existing psychological/ psychiatric state such that it interferes in some significant way with the individual's ability to function. (wikipedia.org)
  • soft tissue injuries
  • Medical professionals strongly suspect shaking as the cause of injuries when a young child presents with retinal bleed, fractures, soft tissue injuries or subdural hematoma, that cannot be explained by accidental trauma or other medical conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Muscle and soft tissue injuries can be classified using a graded system. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • Other research focuses on the pathophysiology of skeletal muscle mitochondrial disorders and the safety and efficacy of exercise training in their treatment. (mcgill.ca)
  • From KidsHealth.org, information for parents regarding treatment for these types of injuries. (dmoztools.net)
  • Information on whiplash injury, how it occurs, factors that affect it and treatment options. (dmoztools.net)
  • ADD/ADHD treatment using EEG biofeedback, a non-drug approach also used with learning disabilities, behavior problems, sleep disorders, and autism. (dmoztools.net)
  • causes
  • What causes a whiplash? (rochester.edu)
  • Congenital causes include hydrocephalus, craniosynostosis (especially of the lambdoid suture), hyperostosis (such as craniometaphyseal dysplasia, osteopetrosis, erythroid hyperplasia), X-linked vitamin D-resistant rickets, and neurofibromatosis type I. Acquired disorders include space occupying lesions due to one of several potential causes ranging from brain tumors to hematomas. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many back injuries share similar causes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diseases
  • The Third Edition of Diseases and Disorders: The World's Best Anatomical Charts features 70 pathology charts created by some of the world's best medical illustrators. (powells.com)
  • The Second Edition of Diseases and Disorders: The World's Best Anatomical Charts features 60 new and updated anatomical charts, created by the world's best medical illustrators and printed in vivid, lifelike colors. (powells.com)
  • common
  • Frequently, TMD has been treated as a single syndrome, but the prevailing modern view is that TMD is a cluster of related disorders with many common features. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sometimes, "temporomandibular joint dysfunction" is described as the most common form of temporomandibular disorder, whereas many other sources use the term temporomandibular disorder synonymously, or instead of the term temporomandibular joint dysfunction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Topics include signs of a brain injury, coping with common problems, and dealing with doctors. (dmoztools.net)
  • Offers answers to common questions about diet and attention deficit disorders. (dmoztools.net)
  • Posterior
  • Type B injuries are those associated with a distraction force resulting in structural damage to the posterior components of the vertebral column. (wikipedia.org)
  • Type C injuries are those associated with damage to both anterior and posterior aspects of the vertebral column resulting in displacement of the disconnected segments in any direction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Strain
  • Grade 2 muscle strain indicates a mild to moderate injury with appreciable tissue damage and some loss of function or strength. (wikipedia.org)
  • Grade 3 muscle strain is the most severe injury grade with the muscle being either completely torn or experiencing complete loss of function. (wikipedia.org)
  • Spinal
  • Syringomyelia is a generic term referring to a disorder in which a cyst or cavity forms within the spinal cord. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some patients with this form of the disorder also have hydrocephalus, in which cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the skull, or a condition called arachnoiditis, in which a covering of the spinal cord-the arachnoid membrane-is inflamed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Founded in 1975, the 152-bed hospital is devoted to the medical treatment, research and rehabilitation for people with spinal cord injury and disease, acquired brain injury, multiple sclerosis, chronic pain and other neuromuscular problems. (wikipedia.org)
  • Each year, Shepherd Center treats hundreds of people who have sustained a spinal cord injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • From the time of acute admission through outpatient follow-up, our Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Program provides a full continuum of care to those who have sustained any level of spinal cord injury - paraplegia, tetraplegia/quadraplegia (including those who are ventilator-dependent) or dual diagnosis (spinal cord and brain injury). (wikipedia.org)
  • In fact, Shepherd Center receives enough patients to maintain 11 full-time treatment teams devoted to spinal cord injury alone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other paralyzing neurological diseases can affect the body like a spinal cord injury, so the Center's physicians also treat patients with transverse myelitis, Guillain-BarrĂ© syndrome, spinal tumors, spina bifida, post-polio syndrome, scoliosis and spinal cord cysts. (wikipedia.org)
  • This classification system can be used to classify injury to the cervical, thoracolumbar, and sacral regions of the spinal column. (wikipedia.org)
  • depression
  • Other risk factors include psychosocial issues such as fear of injury, beliefs that pain means one should not work, beliefs that treatment or time will not help resolve a back episode, the inability to control the condition, high anxiety and/or depression levels, and more. (novahealthandwellness.com)
  • Physical
  • In such cases, the spine must be stabilized to prevent further injury before resuming physical therapy. (spine-health.com)
  • With the advances in arthroscopic surgery, recovery times for shoulder injuries have improved, however physical therapy is still needed to reduce pain quickly, restore range of motion, improve strength and return the individual to the normal activities they like to do. (givensportspt.com)
  • To avoid further injury to current physical conditions and avoid any new injuries, it is paramount that you choose your chiropractor very carefully. (healthyback-ia.pro)
  • Physical therapy attempts to address the illnesses, or injuries that limit a person's abilities to move and perform functional activities in their daily lives. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diagnosis of a back injury begins with a physical examination and thorough medical history by health-care personnel. (wikipedia.org)
  • ligaments
  • We first evaluate the injured area to determine the extent of the injury and ensure that the ligaments or tendons are still intact. (givensportspt.com)
  • Injuries, especially those involving the joints, invariably damage ligaments either by stretching them abnormally or even tearing them. (wikipedia.org)
  • Loose or lax ligaments in turn are not capable of supporting joints as effectively as healthy ones, making the affected individual prone to further injury as well as compensation for the weakness using other parts of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • damage
  • Some injuries, such as whiplash , can damage the neck's soft tissues and joints, resulting in pain and/or stiffness that can last for weeks or much longer. (spine-health.com)
  • Effects of AHT are diffuse axonal injury, oxygen deprivation and swelling of the brain, which can raise pressure inside the skull and damage delicate brain tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Back injuries result from damage, wear, or trauma to the bones, muscles, or other tissues of the back. (wikipedia.org)
  • diagnoses
  • Offers alternative diagnoses, other than attention deficit disorders, for behavioral and attention problems in children and adults. (dmoztools.net)
  • To confirm these diagnoses, or to rule out other injuries or pathology, imaging of the injured region can be ordered. (wikipedia.org)
  • head
  • Abusive head trauma (AHT), commonly known as shaken baby syndrome (SBS), is an injury to a child's head caused by someone else. (wikipedia.org)
  • prevention
  • Shepherd Center's mission is to help people with a temporary or permanent disability caused by injury or disease, rebuild their lives with hope, independence and dignity, advocating for their full inclusion in all aspects of community life while promoting safety and injury prevention. (wikipedia.org)
  • cognitive
  • It was concluded that there were no indications of the slowness or motor disturbances seen in subcortical illnesses such as Parkinson s disease, but that this patient showed the mild cognitive impairments that are commonly found in patients with bipolar disorder. (docplayer.net)
  • nerve
  • Many hypermobility patients suffer from osteoarthritis, disorders involving nerve compression, chondromalacia patellae, excessive anterior mandibular movement, mitral valve prolapse, uterine prolapse and varicose veins. (wikipedia.org)
  • signs
  • In 1971, Guthkelch, a neurosurgeon, hypothesized that such shaking can result in a subdural hematoma, in the absence of any detectable external signs of injury to the skull. (wikipedia.org)
  • diagnosis
  • Shepherd Center's expertise has led to the development of specialized treatment programs dedicated to adolescent patients (ages 12-17), adults, seniors (ages 50 and older), dual diagnosis, intensive care unit patients and those with neuromuscular disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recovery
  • Shepherd Center strives to offer comprehensive rehabilitation to optimize the road to recovery for people who have had a brain injury, as well as people who have had complications from a stroke or tumor. (wikipedia.org)
  • brain
  • Additionally, three new teams have been added on the Comprehensive Rehabilitation Unit (CRU) serving patients with SCI, brain injury, stoke, multiple sclerosis (MS) and other neurological conditions.Shepherd Center is one of 14 rehabilitation hospitals in the nation designated by the federal government as a "Model System" for care of people with SCI. (wikipedia.org)
  • condition
  • usually used in the plural, sequelae) is a pathological condition resulting from a disease, injury, therapy, or other trauma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Conditions
  • There is disagreement over the definitions and criteria used to delineate various disorders and whether some of these conditions should be classified as mental disorders or in other ways. (wikipedia.org)
  • result
  • While ligamentous laxity may be genetic and affect an individual from a very early age, it can also be the result of an injury. (wikipedia.org)