• tumor cells
  • T-cell responses, evaluated by assessing delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions against untransduced autologous tumor cells, were evident in two of eight patients before vaccination and in seven of eight patients after treatment. (aacrjournals.org)
  • A distinctive eosinophilic vasculitis was evident near autologous tumor cells at vaccine sites, and at DTH sites. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Curcumin has been found to suppress tumor cells along the Notch pathway. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Stem Cell
  • The ISSCR 2018 Annual Meeting went "down under" to Melbourne, Australia where 3,000 stem cell scientists, clinicians, and professionals from 52 countries gathered to share their latest research, network with colleagues, and explore the latest technologies driving the field forward. (isscr.org)
  • The ISSCR advocates worldwide for ethical stem cell research and its translation to the clinic. (isscr.org)
  • Find the resources and connections you need to further drive your career and skills in the ever-changing and exciting field of stem cell research. (isscr.org)
  • Whether you are a job seeker or employer, the ISSCR Job Board is the best place to find and post jobs or CVs within the stem cell science community. (isscr.org)
  • When you join the ISSCR, you become part of the world's largest and most renowned stem cell and regenerative medicine community. (isscr.org)
  • A recent public forum in Melbourne, Australia, "Stem Cell Research - Now and in the Future," allowed scientists and experts to share with the public the potential of this rapidly advancing research. (isscr.org)
  • In this blog post, three Australian stem cell scientists who attended the session describe their personal reflections on public engagement. (isscr.org)
  • The International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) is an independent nonprofit organization and the voice of the stem cell research community. (isscr.org)
  • The ISSCR was founded in 2002 to foster the exchange of information on stem cell research and now claims more than 4,100 members worldwide. (isscr.org)
  • Stem Cell Reports is the official journal of the ISSCR and is published by Cell Press. (isscr.org)
  • The ISSCR provides a platform for professional and public education and the promotion of rigorous scientific and ethical standards in stem cell research and regenerative medicine. (isscr.org)
  • Another pathway involved in embryogenesis, the Hedgehog pathway also regulates normal stem cell activity. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • In the Stem Cell Reports study, Zhao and colleagues show that a microRNA-302 mimic -- delivered by a specially constructed lentivirus -- was sufficient to enable neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells that lacked Dgcr8, a vital gene for the processing of the more than 2,000 microRNAs in cells. (eurekalert.org)
  • Since embryonic cells are naturally endowed with a pluripotency program, if you then take that embryo and put it in culture, you can establish pluripotent stem cell lines. (nautil.us)
  • Stem cell research suggests that too much SP2 protein MAY turn stem cells into cancer cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • While going through cell division, one of the two daughter cells actually becomes a new stem cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • epithelium
  • The dark cell epithelium consists of cells with a multitude of pinocytotic vesicles near their luminal surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • M cells are exploited by several pathogenic gram-negative bacteria including Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhimurium, and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, as well as infectious prions, such as in bovine spongiform encephalitis (Mad-cow disease), as a way of penetrating the intestinal epithelium. (wikipedia.org)
  • CXCR4 tropic but not CCR5 tropic HIV has been noted to be able to bind to M cells and get transported across the epithelium by them. (wikipedia.org)
  • B cells have been implicated in the developmental of M cells, since they are also localized in high numbers in the follicular-associated epithelium (FAE). (wikipedia.org)
  • Interestingly, microbes found on intestinal epithelium are known to direct M cell development. (wikipedia.org)
  • membrane
  • Here, we show that lumen formation begins on the interior of single cells, with the formation of an apicosome: a highly organized intracellular membrane-bound apical lumenal compartment studded with microvilli and a primary cilium. (rupress.org)
  • The cell membrane (also known as the plasma membrane or cytoplasmic membrane, and historically referred to as the plasmalemma ) is a biological membrane that separates the interior of all cells from the outside environment (the extracellular space). (wikipedia.org)
  • The basic function of the cell membrane is to protect the cell from its surroundings. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cell membrane controls the movement of substances in and out of cells and organelles. (wikipedia.org)
  • While Robert Hooke 's discovery of cells in 1665 led to the proposal of the Cell Theory , Hooke misled the cell membrane theory that all cells contained a hard cell wall since only plant cells could be observed at the time. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many refuted the existence of a cell membrane still towards the end of the 19th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • The lipid bilayer hypothesis, proposed in 1925 by Gorter and Grendel, created speculation to the description of the cell membrane bilayer structure based on crystallographic studies and soap bubble observations. (wikipedia.org)
  • The paucimolecular model immediately became popular and it dominated cell membrane studies for the following 30 years, until it became rivaled by the fluid mosaic model of Singer and Nicolson (1972). (wikipedia.org)
  • Despite the numerous models of the cell membrane proposed prior to the fluid mosaic model , it remains the primary archetype for the cell membrane long after its inception in the 1970s. (wikipedia.org)
  • The anchor cell next removes the basement membrane that separates the uterus and vulva and invades, initiating the connection between the uterus and the vulva. (wikipedia.org)
  • The primary function of mesangial cells is to remove trapped residues and aggregated protein from the basement membrane thus keeping the filter free of debris. (wikipedia.org)
  • The anchoring filaments from mesangial cells to the glomerular basement membrane can alter capillary flow by changing glomerular ultrafiltration surface area. (wikipedia.org)
  • Contraction of mesangial cells is dependent on cell membrane permeability to calcium ions and relaxation is mediated by paracrine factors, hormones and cAMP. (wikipedia.org)
  • A numerable portion of infoldings occurs at the basal end of the dark cell toward the basal membrane. (wikipedia.org)
  • The basolateral membrane also contains a Na+/K+/Cl--co-transporter, (NKCC1) which transports all three ions into the cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • These cells are known to initiate mucosal immunity responses on the apical membrane of the M cells and allow for transport of microbes and particles across the epithelial cell layer from the gut lumen to the lamina propria where interactions with immune cells can take place. (wikipedia.org)
  • A cell wall composed of cellulose and hemicelluloses, pectin and in many cases lignin, is secreted by the protoplast on the outside of the cell membrane. (wikipedia.org)
  • protein
  • Since too much free-floating iron is toxic, when cells need iron they construct a special protein signal on their surfaces. (washington.edu)
  • The cancer cell, unaware of the toxic compound lurking on its surface, waits for the protein machinery to deliver iron molecules and engulfs everything - iron, proteins and toxic compound. (washington.edu)
  • Like a mentor helping medical students choose between specialties, a protein complex helps shape the destiny of developing T cells, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have reported. (stjude.org)
  • The protein complex is mTORC1, which regulates cell growth and metabolism. (stjude.org)
  • Deleting a key component of mTORC1, a protein called RAPTOR, disabled mTORC1 and altered the metabolic balance in developing T cells. (stjude.org)
  • Sera from three of eight vaccinated men contained new antibodies recognizing polypeptides of 26, 31, and 150 kDa in protein extracts from prostate cells. (aacrjournals.org)
  • The answer for neural cell differentiation in the microRNA-deficient cells turned out to be simple -- a single microRNA or a single protein. (eurekalert.org)
  • In addition, cell membranes are involved in a variety of cellular processes such as cell adhesion , ion conductivity and cell signalling and serve as the attachment surface for several extracellular structures, including the cell wall , the carbohydrate layer called the glycocalyx , and the intracellular network of protein fibers called the cytoskeleton . (wikipedia.org)
  • The shape, size, protein composition, and texture of the nucleus are often altered in malignant cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The apical membranes of the dark cells also have a k+ channel which is formed of two subunits, the KCNE1 regulatory protein and the KCNQ1 channel proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cellular prion protein (PrP) is another example of a cell surface receptor on M cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, the type III secretion system effector protein SopB activates the transition of M cells from enterocytes. (wikipedia.org)
  • extracellular
  • Pieces of the antigen (which are now known as antigenic peptides ) are loaded onto MHC II molecules, and presented on its extracellular surface to CD4+ T cells (sometimes called T helper cells ). (wikipedia.org)
  • Mesangial cells are separated by intercellular spaces containing extracellular matrix called the mesangial matrix that is produced by the mesangial cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • These cells can also be identified by cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix components expressed at the edge of cells or on their cell surfaces, such as actin, villin, cytokeratin, and vimentin. (wikipedia.org)
  • occurs
  • Upon stimulation by a T cell, which usually occurs in germinal centers of secondary lymphoid organs like the spleen and lymph nodes , the activated B cell begins to differentiate into more specialized cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • If damage occurs to a nerve, the Schwann cells will aid in digestion of its axons (phagocytosis). (wikipedia.org)
  • This occurs so then that daughter cell can end up restoring the population of the stem cells that were lost. (wikipedia.org)
  • receptor
  • If all goes as planned, the engineered cells further multiply in the patient's body and, with guidance from their engineered receptor, recognize and kill cancer cells that harbor the antigen on their surfaces. (cancer.gov)
  • identified a receptor present in Kupffer cells, the complement receptor of the immunoglobulin family (CRIg). (wikipedia.org)
  • not in citation given] Immune system cells, such as White Blood cells are thought to use a dual receptor system when they determine whether or not to kill sick, or damaged human cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mesangial cells play a role in restricting macromolecules from accumulating in the mesangial space by receptor- independent uptake processes of phagocytosis, micro- and macro-pinocytosis, or receptor-dependent processes and then transported along the mesangial stalk. (wikipedia.org)
  • More recently, through loss-of-function and rescue-phenotype studies, RANKL is shown to be a receptor activator of NF-κB ligand and play a role in differentiation of M cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • divides
  • When a cancer cell divides, both daughter cells inherit the genetic and epigenetic abnormalities of the parent cell, and may also acquire new genetic and epigenetic abnormalities in the process of cellular reproduction. (wikipedia.org)
  • A parent cell divides to form two daughter cells, and these daughter cells are used to build new tissue, or to replace cells that have died as a result of ageing or damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • immune cells
  • A rapidly emerging immunotherapy approach is called adoptive cell transfer (ACT): collecting and using patients' own immune cells to treat their cancer. (cancer.gov)
  • This research establishes mTORC1-driven metabolic signaling as a decisive factor in determining the fate of developing T cells and suggests metabolic processes are a fundamental mechanism that connects external signals with internal processes to guide the fate of immune cells," Chi said. (stjude.org)
  • Factors promoting the differentiation of M cells have yet to be elucidated, but they are thought to develop in response to signals from immune cells found in developing Peyer's patches. (wikipedia.org)
  • researchers
  • Nevertheless, researchers caution that, in many respects, it's still early days for CAR T cells and other forms of ACT, including questions about whether they will ever be effective against solid tumors like breast and colorectal cancer. (cancer.gov)
  • In just the last few years, progress with CAR T cells and other ACT approaches has greatly accelerated, with researchers developing a better understanding of how these therapies work in patients and translating that knowledge into improvements in how they are developed and tested. (cancer.gov)
  • Researchers at the University of Washington have updated a traditional Chinese medicine to create a compound that is more than 1,200 times more specific in killing certain kinds of cancer cells than currently available drugs, heralding the possibility of a more effective chemotherapy drug with minimal side effects. (washington.edu)
  • In the study, the UW researchers tested their artemisinin-based compound on human leukemia cells. (washington.edu)
  • The researchers also have preliminary results showing that the compound is similarly selective and effective for human breast and prostate cancer cells, and that it effectively and safely kills breast cancer in rats, Sasaki said. (washington.edu)
  • To their surprise, researchers found that disrupting mTORC1 led to metabolic changes that favored development of unconventional T cells at the expense of conventional T cells. (stjude.org)
  • Researchers also reported expression of signature genes associated with γδ T cells was enhanced in mice when RAPTOR was deleted from the mTORC1 complex. (stjude.org)
  • With genetic and biochemical tricks, researchers can reverse a differentiated cell -- such as a skin fibroblast -- into a pluripotent state. (eurekalert.org)
  • Cancer cells have unique features that make them "immortal" according to some researchers. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, researchers utilize these cells to study the development of cancer cells in order to find more specific treatments. (wikipedia.org)
  • differentiate
  • We need to be able to differentiate the iPSCs into a disease-relevant cell type at high efficiency and high purity. (eurekalert.org)
  • For many years, we did not know why these cells did not differentiate," Zhao said. (eurekalert.org)
  • First, the B cells have to encounter a foreign antigen, and are then required to be activated by T helper cells before they differentiate to specific cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Germinal center B cells may differentiate into memory B cells or plasma cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • A cell may stay in this state for several days, and then either die or irrevocably differentiate into a mature, fully differentiated plasma cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cell line is pluripotent and can differentiate into cell types of all three germ layers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also, exposing P19 cells to retinoic acid (RA) can differentiate them into neuronal cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The difference between these subtype cell lines is the ability to differentiate into neuronal cells or muscle cells in response to treatment with retinoic acid or DMSO, respectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since embryonal carcinoma can differentiate into cells of all three germ layers, P19 cells can also differentiate into those ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm-like cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • while 0.5% - 1% DMSO led P19 cells differentiate to cardiac or skeletal muscle cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other than into neurons and astrocytes, P19 cells can also differentiate to oligodendrocytes, which can be detected using the specific markers, myelin-associated glycoprotein and 2',3'-Cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase. (wikipedia.org)
  • genes
  • BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - The more than 200 different types of human cells have the same DNA but express different ensembles of genes. (eurekalert.org)
  • Cancer cells are created when the genes responsible for regulating cell division are damaged. (wikipedia.org)
  • In fact, a series of several mutations to certain classes of genes is usually required before a normal cell will transform into a cancer cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • EPEC (see Pathogenic Escherichia coli) containing plasmids with genes for EAF (Escherichia coli adherence factor) will adhere to M cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • As in mitochondria, which have a genome encoding 37 genes, plastids have their own genomes of about 100-120 unique genes and, it is presumed, arose as prokaryotic endosymbionts living in the cells of an early eukaryotic ancestor of the land plants and algae. (wikipedia.org)
  • mutations
  • However, the results of the study did not point at significant mutations in Fañanas cells but rather described the possible importance of astrocytes in general in the aetiology of CJD. (wikipedia.org)
  • junctions
  • Extraglomerular mesangial cells are in close connection to afferent and efferent arteriolar cells by gap junctions, allowing for intercellular communication. (wikipedia.org)
  • Communication between mesangial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells via gap junctions helps regulate the process of tubuloglomerular feedback and urine formation. (wikipedia.org)
  • intercellular communication
  • Cell walls perform many essential functions: they provide shape to form the tissue and organs of the plant, and play an important role in intercellular communication and plant-microbe interactions. (wikipedia.org)
  • cellular
  • My hypothesis is that we can induce cellular rejuvenation without changing the function of the cells. (nautil.us)
  • neurons
  • Using doses between 1 μM to 3 μM of RA can generate neurons as the most abundant cell type. (wikipedia.org)
  • Myelinating Schwann cells wrap around axons of motor and sensory neurons to form the myelin sheath. (wikipedia.org)
  • Following this process, the Schwann cells can guide regeneration by forming a type of tunnel that leads toward the target neurons. (wikipedia.org)
  • pathogens
  • As its name implies, the backbone of CAR T-cell therapy is T cells , which are often called the workhorses of the immune system because of their critical role in orchestrating the immune response and killing cells infected by pathogens. (cancer.gov)
  • RANKL is expressed throughout the small intestine, facilitates uptake of pathogens such as Salmonella, and is the most critical factor M cell differentiation. (wikipedia.org)
  • maturation
  • After the process of affinity maturation in germinal centers, plasma cells have an indeterminate lifespan, ranging from days to months. (wikipedia.org)
  • proteins
  • The cell then swallows this bundle of iron and proteins. (washington.edu)
  • CXCR1 and CXCR2 are proteins expressed on cells, including CSCs, which respond to the aforementioned cytokines in a deleterious manner. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • The function of a skin cell is to express certain proteins, keratins for example that protect the skin. (nautil.us)
  • metabolism
  • The research appears today in the journal Science Immunology and adds to growing evidence of the critical role cell metabolism plays in the immune system. (stjude.org)
  • Working with mouse models and developing T cells in the laboratory, Chi and his colleagues showed that activation of mTORC1 revs up energy production through glycolysis and oxidation to fuel anabolic metabolism and promote development of αβ T cells. (stjude.org)
  • When investigators disabled mTORC1, metabolism was disrupted, which was associated with a reduction in the αβ T cells and an increase in γδ T cells. (stjude.org)
  • The change reduced anabolic metabolism but increased levels of toxic molecules called reactive oxygen species (ROS) and upregulated activity along a molecular pathway that promotes cell growth. (stjude.org)
  • type
  • They can reprogram themselves to carry out the function of virtually any other type of cell, and play a vital role in early development. (nautil.us)
  • There are different categories of cancer cell, defined according to the cell type from which they originate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS, acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculopathy type), schwannomatosis, and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), and leprosy are all neuropathies involving Schwann cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is possible that they share the same origin as supporting cells such as pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells, or even be a type of specialised vascular smooth muscle cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • Labile cells are one type of the cells that are involved in the division of cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Each of these type of cells respond to injuries of the cells they occupy differently. (wikipedia.org)
  • A somatomammotroph or somatomammotrophic cell, also known as a somatolactotroph or somatolactotrophic cell, is a type of cell of the anterior pituitary gland that produces both somatotropin (growth hormone) and prolactin. (wikipedia.org)
  • The role of this cell type is to support the plant in axes still growing in length, and to confer flexibility and tensile strength on tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • The primary wall lacks lignin that would make it tough and rigid, so this cell type provides what could be called plastic support - support that can hold a young stem or petiole into the air, but in cells that can be stretched as the cells around them elongate. (wikipedia.org)
  • macrophages
  • Kupffer cells, also known as stellate macrophages and Kupffer-Browicz cells, are specialized macrophages located in the liver, lining the walls of the sinusoids that form part of the mononuclear phagocyte system. (wikipedia.org)
  • The main function of M cells is the selective endocytosis of antigens, and transporting them to intraepithelial macrophages and lymphocytes, which then migrate to lymph nodes where an immune response can be initiated. (wikipedia.org)
  • gastrointestinal tract
  • Microfold cells (or M cells) are found in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) of the Peyer's patches in the small intestine, and in the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) of other parts of the gastrointestinal tract. (wikipedia.org)
  • adjacent
  • The gaps between adjacent Schwann cells are called nodes of Ranvier. (wikipedia.org)
  • The extraglomerular mesangial cells are adjacent to the intraglomerular mesangial cells that are located inside the glomerulus and in between the capillaries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Specialized cell-to-cell communication pathways known as plasmodesmata, pores in the primary cell wall through which the plasmalemma and endoplasmic reticulum of adjacent cells are continuous. (wikipedia.org)
  • molecular
  • Over the last two decades, targeted therapies like imatinib (Gleevec®) and trastuzumab (Herceptin®) -drugs that target cancer cells by homing in on specific molecular changes seen primarily in those cells-have also cemented themselves as standard treatments for many cancers. (cancer.gov)
  • For the goal of using stem cells in therapy, the most important step is differentiation from iPSCs," said Rui Zhao, Ph.D., an assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular genetics at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. (eurekalert.org)
  • With the Nissl-method, Fañanas cells can be identified by their slightly bigger, roundish and ovally shaped nuclei, scattered in the molecular and granular layer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mesangial cells form a glomerular functional unit with glomerular endothelial cells and podocytes through interactions of molecular signalling pathways which are essential for the formation of the glomerular tuft. (wikipedia.org)
  • Though many studies have shown various cell types directing the differentiation of M cells, new research characterizes the molecular pathways that guide M cell differentiation. (wikipedia.org)
  • populations
  • FAE lacking B cell populations results in a decrease in the number of M cell lining the Peyer's patches. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some parenchyma cells, as in the epidermis, are specialized for light penetration and focusing or regulation of gas exchange, but others are among the least specialized cells in plant tissue, and may remain totipotent, capable of dividing to produce new populations of undifferentiated cells, throughout their lives. (wikipedia.org)
  • gene expression
  • When they examined gene expression profiles in the differentiated cells, they saw changes in many gene sets regulated by p53, also known as tumor suppressor p53. (eurekalert.org)
  • Moreover, signaling pathways related to neurogenesis and myogenesis were also investigated by studying gene expression or generating mutants of P19 cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • apoptosis
  • While many of the genetic and epigenetic abnormalities in neoplasms are probably neutral evolution , many have been shown to increase the proliferation of the mutant cells, or decrease their rate of death ( apoptosis ). (wikipedia.org)
  • The Notch signaling pathway, also involved in embryogenesis, plays a key role in regulating cell differentiation, proliferation and programmed cell death (apoptosis), as well as the functioning of normal stem cells. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Especially if the cells become injured through a process called necrosis, or even if the cells go through apoptosis.The way these cells regenerate and replace themselves is quite unique. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • This produces what is known as a reconstituted embryo, in which the cytoplasm is the original egg's cytoplasm, and the nucleus is the nucleus of the cell that you isolated. (nautil.us)
  • Schwann cells are known for their roles in supporting nerve regeneration. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cell Park (previously known as Markyate Cell) is a country house in Markyate, Hertfordshire near Luton, England. (wikipedia.org)
  • selectively
  • The scientists attached a chemical homing device to artemisinin that targets the drug selectively to cancer cells, sparing healthy cells. (washington.edu)
  • A new study finds turmeric extract selectively and safely killing cancer stem cells in a way that chemo and radiation can not. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Carcinoma
  • The safety and efficacy of nivolumab for treating metastatic renal cell carcinoma is comparable to that found in the CheckMate 025 trial. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • In a phase Ib study, dual therapy with axitinib and pembrolizumab was well tolerated and demonstrated antitumor activity in treatment-naïve patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • Immunotherapy with atezolizumab plus targeted therapy with bevacizumab improves progression-free survival better than sunitinib in patients with untreated metastatic renal cell carcinoma. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • Partial nephrectomy was associated with decreased odds of death versus radical nephrectomy among patients with cT1b but not cT2 renal cell carcinoma. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • Carcinoma, the majority of cancer cells are epithelial in origin, beginning in the membranous tissues that line the surfaces of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Carcinoma Leukaemia Lymphoma Myeloma Sarcoma Mesothelioma Cancer cells have distinguishing histological features visible under the microscope. (wikipedia.org)
  • These stem cells were named embryonal carcinoma P19 cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • irregular
  • In normal cells, the nucleus is often round or ellipsoid in shape, but in cancer cells the outline is often irregular. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Mesangial cells have irregular shapes with flattened-cylinder-like cell bodies and processes at both ends containing actin, myosin and actinin, giving mesangial cells contractile properties. (wikipedia.org)
  • neuronal
  • Treatment of undifferentiated P19 cells with retinoic acid can specifically induce them into neuronal cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • After six to nine days of treatment, the relative neuronal population declines, likely because of faster proliferation of non-neuronal cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Non-myelinating Schwann cells are involved in maintenance of axons and are crucial for neuronal survival. (wikipedia.org)
  • cancer cells
  • It was highly selective at killing the cancer cells. (washington.edu)
  • Cancer drug designers are faced with the unique challenge that cancer cells develop from our own normal cells, meaning that most ways to poison cancer cells also kill healthy cells. (washington.edu)
  • Most available chemotherapies are very toxic, destroying one normal cell for every five to 10 cancer cells killed, Sasaki said. (washington.edu)
  • The compound Sasaki and his colleagues developed kills 12,000 cancer cells for every healthy cell, meaning it could be turned into a drug with minimal side effects. (washington.edu)
  • Cancer cells need a lot of iron to maintain the rapid division necessary for tumor growth. (washington.edu)
  • Artemisinin alone is fairly effective at killing cancer cells. (washington.edu)
  • It kills approximately 100 cancer cells for every healthy cell, about ten times better than current chemotherapies. (washington.edu)
  • The compound is so selective for cancer cells partly due to their rapid multiplication, which requires high amounts of iron, and partly because cancer cells are not as good as healthy cells at cleaning up free-floating iron. (washington.edu)
  • Cancer cells get sloppy at maintaining free iron, so they are more sensitive to artemisinin," Sasaki said. (washington.edu)
  • Cancer cells are already under significant stress from their high iron contents and other imbalances, Sasaki said. (washington.edu)
  • This compound works on a general property of cancer cells, their high iron content. (washington.edu)
  • Cancer therapies act as a form of artificial selection, killing sensitive cancer cells, but leaving behind resistant cells . (wikipedia.org)
  • Often the tumor will regrow from those resistant cells, the patient will relapse, and the therapy that had been previously used will no longer kill the cancer cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cancer cells are cells that divide relentlessly, forming solid tumours or flooding the blood with abnormal cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Healthy cells stop dividing when there is no longer a need for more daughter cells, but cancer cells continue to produce copies. (wikipedia.org)
  • These work to help the white blood cells to detect and kill cancer cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cancer cells in humans may result in the patient's death if the aggressive cancer cell grows and metastasizes. (wikipedia.org)
  • humans
  • The story follows a New England artist struggling to reunite with his young son after a mysterious signal broadcast over the global cell phone network turns the majority of his fellow humans into mindless vicious animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • genetic
  • Neoplasms are mosaics of different mutant cells with both genetic and epigenetic changes that distinguish them from normal cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Carcinogenesis is caused by mutation and epimutation of the genetic material of normal cells, which upsets the normal balance between proliferation and cell death. (wikipedia.org)
  • Studies researching damaged dark cells due to genetic abnormalities or therapeutics are very important in attempting to understand the onset and mechanism of said balance impairments. (wikipedia.org)