• Arab
  • The site of Roman cities called Portus Albus, Caetaria (current Getares) and Iuliua Tracta, the current name of Algeciras comes from the Arab period of the Iberian Peninsula: Al-Jazīra Al-Khadrā' Arabic الجزيرة الخضراء or Green Island. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pre-Islamic poetry indicates that in the year 600 "Arab" referred to the Semitic-speaking tribes of the Arabian Peninsula. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In the Arab world, the term zawiya can also refer to a Sufi lodge, akin to the term Tekke/Tekyeh in Iran, Turkey and the former Ottoman areas, as well as khanqah or dargah used in various parts of Asia. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is some evidence to suggest that the numerals in their current form developed from Arabic letters in the Maghreb, the western region of the Arab world. (wikipedia.org)
  • The numeral system came to be known to the court of Baghdad, where mathematicians such as the Persian Al-Khwarizmi, whose book On the Calculation with Hindu Numerals was written about 825 in Arabic, and the Arab mathematician Al-Kindi, who wrote four volumes, On the Use of the Indian Numerals (Ketab fi Isti'mal al-'Adad al-Hindi) about 830, propagated it in the Arab world. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arab culture refers to the culture in the countries in which the official language is Arabic (although the Arabic language in some of them is the language of minority), and the west officials and scholars used to call them "Arab countries" of Western Asia and North Africa, from Morocco to the Arabian Sea. (netugc.com)
  • The foreign policy of independent Morocco has often differed from that of its Arab neighbours. (wikitravel.org)
  • Throughout the Cold War, Morocco generally sided with the western European powers and the United States rather than with the Eastern bloc, whereas other Arab states usually chose neutral or even pro-Soviet positions. (wikitravel.org)
  • Maghreb
  • A distinctive West Arabic variant of the symbols begins to emerge around the 10th century in the Maghreb and Al-Andalus, called ghubar ("sand-table" or "dust-table") numerals, which are the direct ancestor of the modern Western Arabic numerals used throughout the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aramaic
  • The language has been further enriched by Ottoman Turkish and Semitic vocabulary, such as Hebrew, Aramaic, and Arabic, especially in the domains of religion, law and spirituality and most of the vocabulary for new and modern concepts has been adopted through French and Italian. (wikipedia.org)
  • By extension, it came to mean that style of Spanish generally in the same way that (among Kurdish Jews) Targum has come to mean Judeo-Aramaic and (among Jews of Arabic-speaking background) sharħ has come to mean Judeo-Arabic. (wikipedia.org)
  • grammar
  • The first European language grammar and dictionary, of Spanish, referred to it as ladino or ladina. (wikipedia.org)
  • if a student was sufficiently interested or apt, it progressed to law (fiqh), theology, Arabic grammar (usually taught with al-Ajurrumi's famous summary), mathematics (mainly as it pertained to the complex legal system of inheritance distribution), and sometimes astronomy. (wikipedia.org)
  • term
  • MBBS) and some qualifications with non-bachelor's titles may be classified as bachelor's degrees (e.g. the Scottish MA and Canadian MD). The term bachelor in the 12th century referred to a knight bachelor, who was too young or poor to gather vassals under his own banner. (wikipedia.org)
  • In general a souq is synonymous with a bazaar or marketplace, and the term souq is used in Arabic speaking countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Modern Standard Arabic the term al-sooq refers to markets in both the physical sense and the abstract economic sense (e.g., an Arabic-speaker would speak of the sooq in the old city as well as the sooq for oil, and would call the concept of the free market السوق الحرّ as-sūq al-ḥurr). (wikipedia.org)
  • word
  • In Morocco and in Iberia, the Arabic word form of kasbah frequently refers to multiple buildings in a keep, a citadel or several structures behind a defensive wall. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the al-Baha and Asir provinces of Saudi Arabia and in Yemen, the word "qasaba" usually refers to a single stone or rock tower, either as part of a tower house or a tower isolated on a hilltop or commanding a field. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, the word "souq" most likely refers to Arabic/North African traditional markets. (wikipedia.org)
  • French
  • In Morocco, a bachelor's degree is referred to as al-ʾijāzah (Arabic, French: licence). (wikipedia.org)
  • born 1931 in Fes, Morocco) businessman worth $2.2 billion as of October 2015 Abdelmajid Benjelloun, a French-speaking writer, poet and historian, specialist in the history of northern Morocco. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acknowledge Zaouias and Marabouts in Morocco (bad translation of a French original) Strategies for Strengthening Local Capacity, with some remarkable statistics on the role of zaouias ("Koranic schooling") in West African literacy. (wikipedia.org)
  • French: Université Al Akhawayn) is an independent, public, not-for-profit, coeducational university located in Ifrane, Morocco, 70 km (43 mi) from the imperial city of Fez, in the midst of the Middle Atlas Mountains. (wikipedia.org)
  • Spanish
  • The Benjelloun family migrated to Morocco as late as 1666 from Andalusia, Spain, around the time of the Spanish Inquisition. (wikipedia.org)
  • and in northern Morocco, the Spanish corruption socco is often used. (wikipedia.org)
  • Marie Olli, a Norwegian woman living in the Spanish town of Fuengirola, contacted the police on 10 May 2007, claiming she had seen a girl matching Madeleine's description in a petrol station in Marrakech, Morocco. (wikipedia.org)
  • name
  • the modern name is derived from this original Arabic name (compare also Algiers and Al Jazeera). (wikipedia.org)
  • European
  • The works of Plato and Aristotle were translated from Greek into Arabic before they were translated into other European languages. (encyclopedia.com)
  • especially
  • Mechoui is prepared, especially in Morocco, by digging a vertical hole, or by constructing an earthen oven, 0.8 to 1 meter in diameter and 1.5 to 2 meters deep. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • One of the best known living or contemporary zawiyas is the Zawiya of Sheikh Ahmed Tijani located in Fes, Morocco. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is also a well known hotel in Marrakesh, Morocco, named Riad Villa al-Arsa. (wikipedia.org)
  • The voltage in Morocco is generally 220 V , and outlets will fit the two-pin plug known as the Europlug . (wikitravel.org)
  • Although
  • Morocco got back from Spain the Moroccan Western Sahara during the late 1970s, Gradual political reforms in the 1990s resulted in the establishment of a bicameral legislature in 1997, although the king still possesses the actual political power. (wikitravel.org)
  • People
  • It seems I was not the only one going through a personal journey, as many of the people who ventured to Morocco either got sick, had flare ups of their own, or had ,what some are calling, "body changes" associated with "new energies. (stillnessinthestorm.com)
  • system
  • It would be more appropriate to refer to the Arabic numeral system, where the value of a digit in a number depends on its position. (wikipedia.org)
  • The decimal Hindu-Arabic numeral system was developed in India by around AD 700. (wikipedia.org)
  • point
  • Julian and I came to Morocco for many reasons, we were at a point in our lives where we wanted to begin living our ideals instead of just surviving. (stillnessinthestorm.com)
  • former
  • Al Akhawayn University was founded by Royal Decree (Dahir) in 1993 and officially inaugurated by the former King Hassan II of Morocco on January 16, 1995. (wikipedia.org)
  • place
  • We were asked in late January 2014 to come be apart of an Intentional Community taking root in Morocco which we felt was going to be a place to till the fields of our collective efforts, grounding this 'New Model' into reality. (stillnessinthestorm.com)