• Odor
  • Thymol (also known as 2-isopropyl-5-methylphenol, IPMP) is a natural monoterpene phenol derivative of cymene, C10H14O, isomeric with carvacrol, found in oil of thyme, and extracted from Thymus vulgaris (common thyme) and various other kinds of plants as a white crystalline substance of a pleasant aromatic odor and strong antiseptic properties. (wikipedia.org)
  • topical
  • Colophony (Rosin) - rosin, sap or sawdust typically from spruce or fir trees Topical steroid - see steroid allergy Photographic developers, especially those containing metol Topical anesthetics - such as pramoxine or diphenhydramine, after prolonged use Isothiazolinones - preservatives used in many personal care, household, and commercial products. (wikipedia.org)
  • vaccines
  • Thiomersal was used as a preservative (bactericide) so that multidose vials of vaccines could be used instead of single-dose vials, which are more expensive. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike other vaccine preservatives used at the time, thiomersal does not reduce the potency of the vaccines that it protects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Citing medical and scientific consensus that thiomersal in vaccines posed no safety issues, but that eliminating the preservative in multi-dose vaccines, primarily used in developing countries, will lead to high cost and a requirement for refrigeration which the developing countries can ill afford, the UN's final decision is to exclude thiomersal from the treaty. (wikipedia.org)
  • properties
  • Its antiseptic properties help prevent infection in open wounds, such as cuts and scrapes, and it is soothing for diaper rash and chapped hands. (reference.com)
  • The antiseptic qualities of cassareep are well known-so well known, in fact, that the Reverend J.G. Wood, who published his Wanderings in South America in 1879, was criticized for not mentioning the "antiseptic properties of cassava juice (cassareep), which enables the Indian on a canoe voyage to take with him a supply of meat for several days. (wikipedia.org)
  • thiomersal
  • The pharmaceutical corporation Eli Lilly and Company gave thiomersal the trade name Merthiolate. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the United States, countries in the European Union and a few other affluent countries, thiomersal is no longer used as a preservative in routine childhood vaccination schedules. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lilly
  • Eli Lilly and Company is a global pharmaceutical company headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, with offices in 18 countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • The company was founded in 1876 by Col. Eli Lilly, a pharmaceutical chemist and veteran of the American Civil War, after whom the company was named. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eli Lilly is a full member of the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA). (wikipedia.org)
  • The company's founder was Colonel Eli Lilly, a pharmaceutical chemist and Union army veteran of the American Civil War. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lilly used his share of the assets, which amounted to an estimated $400 in merchandise (several pieces of equipment and a few gallons of unmixed chemicals) and about $1,000 in cash, to open his own pharmaceutical manufacturing business in Indianapolis in May 1876. (wikipedia.org)
  • chemist
  • As a pharmaceutical chemist, I'm very vocal about not vaccinating my kids. (blogspot.com)
  • Colonel Lilly's only son, Josiah (J. K.), a pharmaceutical chemist, graduated from the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy in 1882, and joined the family business as a superintendent of its laboratory after college. (wikipedia.org)
  • laboratory
  • Professor Attfield, professor of practical chemistry for the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain, however, in the 1870 edition of the Year-book of Pharmacy, claimed that his laboratory studies proved no effectiveness whatsoever. (wikipedia.org)
  • Natural
  • Introduced in January 1904 by a pharmaceutical and suture maker Van Horn and Sawtell of New York City, and later acquired by Johnson & Johnson, K-Y Jelly's original stated purpose was as a surgical lubricant, and it was often chosen by doctors because of its natural base. (wikipedia.org)
  • skin
  • The Blackfoot Native Americans recognized these plants' strong antiseptic action, and used poultices of the plants for skin infections and minor wounds. (wikipedia.org)
  • found
  • an early example was a publication in The Pharmaceutical Journal from 1847, and similar references can be found throughout the late nineteenth century, such as in the work of Irish naturalist and explorer Thomas Heazle Parke and in pharmaceutical and trade journals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Product
  • It was one of the first pharmaceutical companies to produce human insulin using recombinant DNA including Humulin (insulin medication), Humalog (Insulin lispro), and the first approved biosimilar insulin product in the US, Basaglar (insulin glargine). (wikipedia.org)
  • effects
  • In multidose injectable drug delivery systems, it prevents serious adverse effects such as the Staphylococcus infection that, in one 1928 incident, killed 12 of 21 children vaccinated with a diphtheria vaccine that lacked a preservative. (wikipedia.org)