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  • bacterial
  • If the organism is a Group A hemolytic streptococcus, the area immediately around the bacterial colony will be cleared of red blood cells. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • It is possibly the most numerous bacterium in the world (perhaps 1028 individual cells) and, along with other members of the SAR11 clade, are estimated to make up between a quarter and a half of all bacterial or archaeal cells in the ocean. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are typically 40 million bacterial cells in a gram of soil and a million bacterial cells in a millilitre of fresh water. (wikipedia.org)
  • The famous notion that bacterial cells in the human body outnumber human cells by a factor of 10:1 has been debunked. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are approximately 39 trillion bacterial cells in the human microbiota as personified by a "reference" 70 kg male 170 cm tall, whereas there are 30 trillion human cells in the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike cells of animals and other eukaryotes, bacterial cells do not contain a nucleus and rarely harbour membrane-bound organelles. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • Modern molecular and immunobinding studies are now probing the specific mechanisms in wall development including modulations that occur during morphogenesis and in response to environmental triggers. (springer.com)
  • Only about 5 % of red algae occur in fresh water. (differencebetween.com)
  • Approximately 5% of the red algae occur in freshwater environments with greater concentrations found in the warmer area. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a system where algae is intentionally cultivated, maintained, and harvested, neither eutrophication nor hypoxia are likely to occur. (wikipedia.org)
  • dulse
  • Some red algae are important foods such as laver, dulse etc. (differencebetween.com)
  • Red algae such as dulse (Palmaria palmata) and laver (nori/gim) are a traditional part of European and Asian cuisines and are used to make other products such as agar, carrageenans and other food additives. (wikipedia.org)
  • bacterium
  • In this study, a β-agarase gene, agaB - 4 , was isolated for the first time from the agar-degrading bacterium Paenibacillus agarexedens BCRC 17346 by using next-generation sequencing. (springer.com)
  • The bacterium attaches to the surface of green algae of the genus Chlorella. (wikipedia.org)
  • On May 21, 2010, Science reported that the Venter group had successfully synthesized the genome of the bacterium Mycoplasma mycoides from a computer record, and transplanted the synthesized genome into the existing cell of a Mycoplasma capricolum bacterium that had had its DNA removed. (wikipedia.org)
  • sugars
  • Red algae store sugars as floridean starch, which is a type of starch that consists of highly branched amylopectin without amylose, as food reserves outside their plastids. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is also possible to grow certain types of algae without light, these types of algae consume sugars (such as glucose). (wikipedia.org)
  • Chlamydomonas
  • Adair WS, Snell WJ (1990) The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cell wall: structure, biochemistry and molecular biology. (springer.com)
  • The tetrad is the four spores produced after meiosis of a yeast or other Ascomycota, Chlamydomonas or other alga, or a plant. (wikipedia.org)
  • cellulose
  • Anderson CT, Carroll A, Akhmetova L, Somerville C (2010) Real-time imaging of cellulose reorientation during cell wall expansion in Arabidopsis roots. (springer.com)
  • In plants, a secondary cell wall is a thicker additional layer of cellulose which increases wall rigidity. (wikipedia.org)
  • cultivation
  • Macroalgae, commonly known as seaweed, also have many commercial and industrial uses, but due to their size and the specific requirements of the environment in which they need to grow, they do not lend themselves as readily to cultivation (this may change, however, with the advent of newer seaweed cultivators, which are basically algae scrubbers using upflowing air bubbles in small containers). (wikipedia.org)
  • Commercial and industrial algae cultivation has numerous uses, including production of food ingredients such as omega-3 fatty acids or natural food colorants and dyes, food, fertilizer, bioplastics, chemical feedstock (raw material), pharmaceuticals, and algal fuel, and can also be used as a means of pollution control. (wikipedia.org)
  • Water, carbon dioxide, minerals and light are all important factors in cultivation, and different algae have different requirements. (wikipedia.org)
  • The water must be in a temperature range that will support the specific algal species being grown mostly between 15˚C and 35˚C. In a typical algal-cultivation system, such as an open pond, light only penetrates the top 3 to 4 inches (76-102 mm) of the water, though this depends on the algae density. (wikipedia.org)
  • organism
  • The organism incites a chronic granulomatous inflammation with infiltrate of histiocytes, lymphocytes, giant cells and occasional eosinophils. (wikipedia.org)
  • The organism has thick wall, internal septations, measures 3-11 µm in diameter. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pelagibacter ubique (an α-proteobacterium of the order Rickettsiales) has the smallest known genome (1,308,759 base pairs) of any free living organism and is one of the smallest self-replicating cells known. (wikipedia.org)
  • mycelium
  • In a laboratory it will grow 5 mm per day on seawater-cornmeal agar with low aerial mycelium and colorless colonies, but will not grow at all on potato-carrot agar. (wikipedia.org)
  • The optimum temperature for their growth is 25 °C. In an agar plate the vegetative mycelium is mostly submerged in the agar, while the conidial heads are typically arranged in zones. (wikipedia.org)
  • colonies
  • Lactose and neutral red are added to the MacConkey agar to differentiate the lactose fermenters, which form pink colonies, from lactose nonfermenters that form clear colonies. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • When cultured at a temperature of 25 °C on potato dextrose agar it forms white colonies which become powdery and/or granular as they mature. (wikipedia.org)
  • mycoplasma
  • Once a version of the minimal 382-gene chromosome has been synthesized, it is intended to be transplanted into a M. genitalium cell to create Mycoplasma laboratorium. (wikipedia.org)
  • septate
  • The hyphae of M. brevicaulis are hyaline (transparent) and septate (separated into segments by cross-walls). (wikipedia.org)
  • laxative
  • Agar can be used as a laxative , an appetite suppressant, a vegetarian substitute for gelatin , a thickener for soups , in fruit preserves , ice cream , and other desserts, as a clarifying agent in brewing , and for sizing paper and fabrics. (wikipedia.org)
  • plants
  • Proteins are also found in algal cell walls including highly glycosylated and hydroxyproline-rich forms, some of which have structural semblance to extensins and arabinogalactan proteins of land plants. (springer.com)
  • By the 1980s, some authors suggested replacing the term "cell wall", particularly as it was used for plants, with the more precise term "extracellular matrix", as used for animal cells, but others preferred the older term. (wikipedia.org)
  • Both marine and freshwater taxa are represented by free-living macroalgal forms and smaller endo/epiphytic/zoic forms, meaning they live in or on other algae, plants, and animals In addition, some marine species have adopted a parasitic lifestyle and may be found on closely or more distantly related red algal hosts In the system of Adl et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2005, the red algae are classified in the Archaeplastida, along with the glaucophytes and green algae plus land plants (Viridiplantae or Chloroplastida). (wikipedia.org)
  • sporangia
  • full citation needed] Diagnosis can be made through culture of infected fluid in Sabouraud dextrose agar or by visualization of sporangia containing sporangiospores on tissue biopsy (using hematoxylin/eosin, GMS, or PAS histochemical stains). (wikipedia.org)
  • culture
  • Agar has been used as an ingredient in desserts throughout Asia, and also as a solid substrate to contain culture media for microbiological work. (wikipedia.org)
  • An agar plate is a sterile petri dish that contains agar plus nutrients (growth media), used to culture microorganisms . (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Gromov and Mamkaeva first isolated Bdellovibrio chlorellavorus in a lysis experiment with the algae Chlorella vulgaris from Ukrainian reservoir waters from a mass culture of Chlorella Beijer in 1966. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Hugenholtz and colleagues from the University of Queensland in Australia, have completed shotgun sequencing of lyophilized cells of V. chlorellavourus strain in culture with Chlorella vulgaris. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dilution follows a microscopic examination of the source culture that predicts that a few of the growing containers contain a single cell of the desired species. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the algae grow and multiply, the culture becomes so dense that it blocks light from reaching deeper into the water. (wikipedia.org)
  • however, exposing an algae culture to direct sunlight (rather than shading it) is often the best course for strong growth, as the algae underneath the surface is able to utilize more of the less intestine light created from the shade of the algae above. (wikipedia.org)
  • The vesicles, which are globose with thin walls and a diameter of 35 × 50 µm, produce sterigmata over the entire surface in culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • biofuel
  • Algae are critical to global primary production, CO 2 sequestering and biomineralization as well as being of economic significance in the food, pharmaceutical and biofuel industries. (springer.com)
  • Irish
  • Chondrus crispus-commonly called Irish moss or carrageen moss (Irish carraigín, "little rock")-is a species of red algae which grows abundantly along the rocky parts of the Atlantic coast of Europe and North America. (wikipedia.org)
  • coli
  • His-tagged recombinant AgaB-4 (rAgaB-4) was purified from the soluble fraction of E. coli cell lysate through immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. (springer.com)
  • Blood agar, which is generally combined with horse blood, can be used to detect the presence of hemorrhagic microorganisms such as E. coli (O:157 H:7). (newworldencyclopedia.org)