• photograph
  • When backed with black varnish, paper or cloth the thin negative turned into a positive photograph. (studioq.com)
  • Because the image emerges as a direct result of exposure to light, without the aid of a developing solution, an albumen print may be said to be a printed rather than a developed photograph. (wikipedia.org)
  • A paper overlay could be used when framing the photograph to hide the parts showing the mother, focusing on the child instead. (wikipedia.org)
  • In October 1999, Sotheby's sold a Le Gray albumen print "Beech Tree, Fontainebleau" for £419,500, which was a world record for the most expensive single photograph ever sold at auction, to an anonymous buyer. (wikipedia.org)
  • print
  • A negative image on film is traditionally used to photographically create a positive image on a paper base, known as a print, either by using an enlarger or by contact printing. (wikipedia.org)
  • The albumen print, also called albumen silver print, was published in January 1847 by Louis Désiré Blanquart-Evrard, and was the first commercially exploitable method of producing a photographic print on a paper base from a negative. (wikipedia.org)
  • Later that day at the same auction, however, an albumen print of "Grande Vague, Sète" ("The Big Wave at Sète," "The Great Wave, Sète") also by Le Gray was sold for a new world record price of £507,500 or $840,370 to "the same anonymous buyer" who was later revealed to be Sheik Saud Al-Thani of Qatar. (wikipedia.org)
  • photography
  • Later, hand-colouring was used with successive photographic innovations, from albumen and gelatin silver prints to lantern slides and transparency photography. (wikipedia.org)
  • photography was to encounter many such dead ends in the next century. (sharlot.org)
  • Due to the overwhelming response and unprecidented demand for true 19th century authentic wet-plate collodion photography, we are offering our totally unique portrait weekends again, but with thrice as many as ever before. (johncoffer.com)
  • He is interested only in what they are made of: the papers, chemicals and metals that constituted the richly varied physical world of photography for about 170 years, until the rise of digital cameras and printing a decade ago began to render it obsolete. (blogspot.com)
  • The box type camera obscura was the basis for the earliest photographic cameras when photography was developed in the early 19th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1856, seeing the tremendous potential for reproducible and enlarged prints and illustrated newspapers, Brady hired photographer and businessman, Alexander Gardner, who instructed him in the new art of wet-plate collodion photography. (wikipedia.org)
  • photographers
  • Some photographers preferred the diluted albumen because it was easier to tone, though many chose matte papers for aesthetic reasons. (conservation-us.org)
  • The latter made the dry form unsuitable for the usual portraiture work of most professional photographers of the 19th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pioneers such as Mads Alstrup and Georg Emil Hansen paved the way for a rapidly growing profession during the last half of the 19th century while both artistic and press photographers have made internationally recognized contributions. (wikipedia.org)
  • binder
  • Even if only one kind of binder is used, a whole range of effects may be accomplished by simply varying the dilution, i.e. the amount, of binder that is applied to the raw paper. (conservation-us.org)
  • Even a 2% solution of albumen causes a significant improvement in depth and contrast over a paper that is simply salted and has no organic binder at all. (conservation-us.org)
  • chemist
  • In the early seventeenth century, the Italian physician and chemist Angelo Sala wrote that powdered silver nitrate was blackened by the sun, but did not find any practical application of the phenomenon. (wikipedia.org)
  • 17th century
  • Della Porta's advice was widely adopted by artists and since the 17th century portable versions of the camera obscura were commonly used - first as a tent, later as boxes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The scientific revolution in 17th century Europe stimulated innovation and discovery in Britain. (wikipedia.org)
  • silver
  • The paper is then dipped in a solution of silver nitrate and water which renders the surface sensitive to UV light. (wikipedia.org)
  • These materials are of landmark historical importance and also are fundamental to any modern practice with handmade silver printing-out papers. (conservation-us.org)
  • The main differences lie in the materials and techniques of coating the raw paper with organic binders to carry the silver image. (conservation-us.org)
  • Since silver nitrate is water soluble and was observed to darken when exposed to light either in solution or dried, it would seem to be the simplest of experiments to dip paper into a solution and make shadow pictures in the sun. (sharlot.org)
  • The sizing materials used in some papers prevented good penetration and wetting, as did silver salts and processing residues. (sharlot.org)
  • Previous discoveries of photosensitive methods and substances-including silver nitrate by Albertus Magnus in the 13th century, a silver and chalk mixture by Johann Heinrich Schulze in 1724, and Joseph Niépce's bitumen-based heliography in 1822 contributed to development of the daguerreotype. (wikipedia.org)
  • He first developed the Talbotype, which used silver chloride to sensitize paper. (wikipedia.org)
  • widely
  • During the first decade of the 21st century, traditional film-based photochemical methods were increasingly marginalized as the practical advantages of the new technology became widely appreciated and the image quality of moderately priced digital cameras was continually improved. (wikipedia.org)
  • The American Civil War was the most widely covered conflict of the 19th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • cabinet
  • Both were most often albumen prints, the primary difference being the cabinet card was larger and usually included extensive logos and information on the reverse side of the card to advertise the photographer's services. (wikipedia.org)
  • exposure
  • Though direct sunlight was used long ago, a UV exposure unit is often used contemporarily because it is more predictable, as the paper is most sensitive to ultraviolet light. (wikipedia.org)
  • Collodion is normally used in its wet form, but can also be used in humid ("preserved") or dry form, at the cost of greatly increased exposure time. (wikipedia.org)
  • While exposure times shrank as photographic technology developed, to get a clear picture of a child during the 19th century the child had to be persuaded to stay still, which could be difficult to achieve. (wikipedia.org)
  • image
  • A hole in the cave wall will act as a pinhole camera and project a laterally reversed, upside down image on a piece of paper. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is a box with a hole in it which allows light to go through and create an image onto the piece of paper. (wikipedia.org)
  • The paper with negative is then exposed to light until the image achieves the desired level of darkness, which is typically a little lighter than the end product. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the later half of the 16th century some technical improvements were developed: a (biconvex) lens in the opening (first described by Gerolamo Cardano in 1550) and a diaphragm restricting the aperture (Daniel Barbaro in 1568) gave a brighter and sharper image. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1816: Heliography The first person who succeeded in producing a paper negative of the camera image was Joseph Nicephore Niepce. (wikipedia.org)
  • nineteenth
  • The one-stop blog spot for your Nineteenth Century Mustache needs! (blogspot.com)
  • The Nineteenth Century gave us many things, but above all it was a hotbed of facial hair experimentation and this is but a poor sampling of those many lost forms. (blogspot.com)
  • chemicals
  • Some of that information has long been lost in the weeds of history, left there by innovators who experimented with exotic chemicals and papers and left little record of what they were up to. (blogspot.com)
  • substances
  • When the value of organic binders was realized, the salting step became a "salting-sizing" step, whereby suitable organic substances were coated onto the paper to give increased density and detail. (conservation-us.org)
  • When the value of sizing on printing papers became clear, a wide variety of gums, sugars, starches, proteins, resins and other substances were tried. (conservation-us.org)