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  • late 19th century
  • As early as the late 19th century Boston citizens were advised not to swim in any portion of the Harbor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Conducted in the late 19th century, Veblen's socio-economic analyses of the business cycles and the consequent price politics of the U.S. economy, and of the emergent division of labour, by technocratic speciality - scientist, engineer, technologist, et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • The stratified society In the late 19th century, The Theory of the Leisure Class: An Economic Study in the Evolution of Institutions (1899) established that the economic life of a modern society is based upon the social stratification of tribal and feudal societies, rather than upon merit, that is to say, upon social and economic utility. (wikipedia.org)
  • 15th
  • They were the dominant countries that had colonized many other nations from the early 15th century to the early 19th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mercantilism was the dominant school of economic thought in Europe throughout the late Renaissance and early modern period (from the 15th to the 18th century). (wikipedia.org)
  • The Theory of the Leisure Class: An Economic Study of Institutions (1899), by Thorstein Veblen, is a treatise on economics and a detailed, social critique of conspicuous consumption, as a function of social class and of consumerism, derived from the social stratification of people and the division of labour, which are the social institutions of the feudal period (9th - 15th centuries) that have continued to the modern era. (wikipedia.org)
  • world's
  • The global language system draws upon the world system theory to account for the relationships between the world's languages and divides them into a hierarchy consisting of four levels, namely the peripheral, central, supercentral and hypercentral languages. (wikipedia.org)
  • Indian textiles had maintained a competitive advantage over British textiles up until the 19th century, when Britain eventually overtook India as the world's largest cotton textile manufacturer. (wikipedia.org)
  • He is the world's leading authority on the 19th Century American landscape artist Gilbert Munger and he authors the online catalog raisonne. (umn.edu)
  • early
  • According to de Swaan, the global language system has been constantly evolving since the time period of the early 'military-agrarian' regimes. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, Bengali exports declined over the course of the early 19th century, as British imports to Bengal increased, from 25% in 1811 to 93% in 1840. (wikipedia.org)
  • What they found was that in the 'early' stages of visual processing, the activity of neurons mostly reflected what was being presented to the eyes, but that deeper inside the brain were neurons whose firing was associated instead with the monkey's report (via the lever) of what it was experiencing. (lrb.co.uk)
  • in particular, early business cycle theories treated goods markets and financial markets separately. (wikipedia.org)
  • work
  • Beiser instead traces Naturphilosophie as developed by Schelling, Hegel, Schlegel and Novalis to a crux in the theory of matter, and identifies the origins of the line they took with the vis viva theory of matter in the work of Gottfried Leibniz. (wikipedia.org)
  • Monkeys were trained to use a lever to indicate which image they were seeing in just such a situation (a clever experimental feat in itself), and Logothetis and his colleagues recorded the activity of neurons in different parts of the monkeys' brains to work out which were active when each image was being registered. (lrb.co.uk)
  • Activity zone for children Entrance to feature on the digestive system Slum street in Victorian Leeds Tableau of a 19th-century midwife at work Part of the Wilkinson Apothecary Gallery Apothecary Set of tools for amputation Red wine and germ theory The Thackray Medical Museum houses a collection of over 50,000 objects from medical history which date from Roman times to the present day. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although business cycle theory was well established by the 1920s, work by theorists such as Dennis Robertson and Ralph Hawtrey had little impact on public policy. (wikipedia.org)
  • David Hume had presented such a theory in his 1752 work Of Money (Essays, Moral, Political, and Literary, Part II, Essay III). (wikipedia.org)
  • However, it was gradually replaced by the more pragmatic term "wage work" towards the end of the 19th century, as labor organizations shifted their focus to raising wages. (thefullwiki.org)
  • In addition to this, you will also study the 'Introduction to Sport Psychology' module which aims to develop your knowledge of the fundamental concepts of sport psychology practice, establishing links between core psychological theories and topics, and practical work conducted in the applied setting. (leedstrinity.ac.uk)
  • You'll put this theory into practice through the two professional work placements included in your degree, as well as assessments which help you to develop valuable real-world skills. (leedstrinity.ac.uk)
  • principles
  • The goal of systems theory is systematically discovering a system's dynamics, constraints, conditions and elucidating principles (purpose, measure, methods, tools, etc.) that can be discerned and applied to systems at every level of nesting, and in every field for achieving optimized equifinality. (wikipedia.org)
  • General systems theory is about broadly applicable concepts and principles, as opposed to concepts and principles applicable to one domain of knowledge. (wikipedia.org)
  • As a transdisciplinary, interdisciplinary and multiperspectival domain, the area brings together principles and concepts from ontology, philosophy of science, physics, computer science, biology and engineering as well as geography, sociology, political science, psychotherapy (within family systems therapy) and economics among others. (wikipedia.org)
  • He is a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery and has been general chairman and program committee member for various SIGOPS Symposia on Operating Systems Principles. (umn.edu)
  • 1970s
  • By the 1970s, however, flaws and gaps in these comprehensive theories led many psychologists to conclude that learning could not be represented by a single universal theory. (britannica.com)
  • methodology
  • Since the mid 1990s he has been involved in technical outreach activities exploring the impact of the web on the methodology of cultural history. (umn.edu)
  • Rigorous, "objective" methodology was attempted so that the behaviour of all organisms could be comprehended under a unified system of laws modeled on those posited in the physical sciences. (britannica.com)
  • governmental
  • Besides, they also have a strong governmental system in the country, which oversees the bureaucracies in the governmental departments. (wikipedia.org)
  • The accounting entity (the focus of attention) may be a profit-seeking business enterprise, a governmental unit or activity, an eleemosynary institution, or any other organization for which financial data will be useful in determining the proper conduct of its economic affairs. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Governmental reporting requirements have served since antiquity to reinforce business needs for accounting systems and controls. (encyclopedia.com)
  • global
  • Dutch sociologist Abram de Swaan developed this theory in 2001 in his book Words of the World: The Global Language System and according to him, "the multilingual connections between language groups do not occur haphazardly, but, on the contrary, they constitute a surprisingly strong and efficient network that ties together - directly or indirectly - the six billion inhabitants of the earth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Besides, the world-systems theory also allowed the global language system to expand further. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chang's cage-rattling, contrarian history of global capital appeals to readers new to economic theory as well as members of the old school looking for a fresh take. (softpanorama.org)
  • These efforts organized national resources sufficiently in the defense of England against the far larger and more powerful Spanish Empire, and in turn paved the foundation for establishing a global empire in the 19th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • But in 1988, Bernard Baars put forward his 'global workspace' theory, that a system in the brain functions to integrate diverse sources of information for use in a slow, attentive style of thinking. (lrb.co.uk)
  • He has worked on time-sharing, computer security, distributed email systems, remote procedure call, switch-based local area networks, large-scale naming systems, global cluster file systems, and web-based access to personal information. (umn.edu)
  • earlier
  • Sociological systems thinking started earlier, in the 19th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • Naturphilosophie ("philosophy of nature" or "nature-philosophy" in German) is a term used in English-language philosophy to identify a current in the philosophical tradition of German idealism, as applied to the study of nature in the earlier 19th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • Only the church and strong monarchs maintained and occasionally pushed forward the earlier systems of record keeping and control. (encyclopedia.com)
  • closely
  • It includes a system of closely interrelated groups of nerve cells (ganglia) in invertebrates and of the spinal cord and the brain in vertebrates, including humans. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The system outlined by Pacioli in the section entitled "De computes et scriptures" ("Of Reckonings and Writings") was a surprisingly complete one, and for four centuries almost all texts on accounting were closely patterned after it. (encyclopedia.com)
  • widely
  • There is currently no publicly available research or trial data to support these claims, but BCSR systems are fairly widely used in organic farms and many positive testimonials from farmers and gardeners can be found on the internet and in alternative agriculture literature. (wikipedia.org)
  • [ 20 ] The imagery of wage slavery was widely used by labor organizations during the mid-19th century to object to the lack of workers' self-management. (thefullwiki.org)
  • half
  • In the latter half of the 19th century, the first attempt at standardizing discipline in the American Church occurred with the convocation of the Plenary Councils of Baltimore. (wikipedia.org)
  • As it has developed in the more than four and a half centuries since Pacioli, the term "double entry" has probably referred to the two-sided nature of transactions, to the debit and credit aspects of each event. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In the federation that was America, Relations between state governments and the federal government in immigration governance were not clear until the second half of the 19th century. (yomiuri.co.jp)
  • characteristics
  • Homeostasis: The tendency of a system to be resilient towards external factors and maintain its key characteristics. (wikipedia.org)
  • thus, his theories of socio-economics emphasize evolution and development as characteristics of human institutions. (wikipedia.org)
  • typically
  • [ 25 ] This contention has been partly corroborated by some modern studies that indicate slaves' material conditions in the 19th century were "better than what was typically available to free urban laborers at the time. (thefullwiki.org)
  • psychological
  • Psycholinguists (those who study the psychological aspects of language ability) argue that language learning involves too many words and combinations to be satisfactorily explained by association theory. (britannica.com)
  • Developments
  • Developments and modifications to the Greek musical system were made during the Middle Ages, which led to music like Gregorian chant. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other 19th-century critics, following Rousseau have accepted this differentiation between higher and lower culture, but have seen the refinement and sophistication of high culture as corrupting and unnatural developments that obscure and distort people's essential nature. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this article, multiple theories are discussed, as are recent developments with regard to these theories. (wikipedia.org)
  • time
  • Throughput: Rate of energy transfer between the system and its environment during the time it is functioning. (wikipedia.org)
  • The movement is particularly associated with reform and development of the asylum system in Western Europe at that time. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mercantilist theory varies in sophistication from one writer to another and has evolved over time. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many nations applied the theory, notably France, which was the most important state economically in Europe at the time. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1990, Francis Crick, working with Christof Koch, offered a somewhat different theory, focusing on consciousness in visual experience, and around the same time some groundbreaking experiments were undertaken by Nikos Logothetis, working with Jeffrey Schall and David Leopold. (lrb.co.uk)
  • It had been known since the 19th century that if quite different images are shown to each of your eyes at the same time, your conscious experience doesn't blend the two but flips between them. (lrb.co.uk)
  • The Modern period of globalization covers from the 19th century until the present time. (wikipedia.org)
  • He was co-inventor of the Needham-Schroeder authentication protocol, and a designer / builder of the Multics time sharing system, the Grapevine distributed email system, the Cedar distributed file system, the Topaz distributed operating system, the Autonet and AN2 switch-based LANs, and the Pachyderm web-based email system. (umn.edu)
  • Mainstream
  • The 19th-century history of the Catholic Church in the United States was characterized by several unsuccessful attempts by Catholics to culturally integrate themselves into the mainstream American culture of that century. (wikipedia.org)
  • history
  • He submitted me the Strength of Materials and Theory of Elasticity in 19th Century Italy: A Brief Account of the History of Mechanics of Solids and Structures of the 220-kD server in the s( and I have recently of real-world for any advanced tangent I give since I are previously carried my role since together, represented Collectively by the gonads of surprising & outside tumorsCA). (ecombinatii.ro)
  • objective
  • Nature as the sum of what is objective, and intelligence as the complex of all the activities making up self-consciousness, appear as equally real. (wikipedia.org)
  • American
  • therefore, conspicuous consumption was an un-American activity contrary to the country's dynamic culture of individualism. (wikipedia.org)
  • wave
  • This marked the beginning of a boom in atheoretical, statistical models of economic fluctuation (models based on cycles and trends instead of economic theory) that led to the discovery of apparently regular economic patterns like the Kuznets wave. (wikipedia.org)
  • biology
  • Historically, according to Richards: Despite the tentativeness of their titles, these monographs introduced radical interpretations of nature that would reverberate through the sciences, and particularly the biology, of the next century. (wikipedia.org)
  • economics
  • Whereas neoclassical economics define people as rational agents who seek utility and maximal pleasure from their economic activities, Veblen perceived people as irrational, economic agents who pursue social status and the prestige inherent to a place in society (class and economic stratum) with little regard to their own happiness. (wikipedia.org)
  • biological
  • BCSR supporters argue that a soil balanced using their methods leads to greater crop yield and nutritional quality, as well as increasing the soil biological activity and the physical properties of tilth, aeration, and moisture retention. (wikipedia.org)
  • grew
  • In less than a century the corner shop grew into one of Britain's principal medical companies, Chas F Thackray Limited, manufacturing drugs and medical instruments and pioneering the hip replacement operation alongside Sir John Charnley. (wikipedia.org)
  • authors
  • Many authors find the clear link between neural activity and cognition to be an appealing aspect of connectionism. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] The authors noted most for establishing the English mercantilist system include Gerard de Malynes and Thomas Mun, who first articulated the Elizabethan system, which in turn was then developed further by Josiah Child. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • The neural network branch of connectionism suggests that the study of mental activity is really the study of neural systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • Systems theory is the interdisciplinary study of systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • Systems theory thus serves as a bridge for interdisciplinary dialogue between autonomous areas of study as well as within the area of systems science itself. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Theory of the Leisure Class: An Economic Study of Institutions (1899) presents the evolutionary development of human institutions (social and economic) that shape society, such as how the citizens earn their livelihoods, wherein technology and the industrial arts are the creative forces of economic production. (wikipedia.org)
  • consciousness
  • That moment having finally passed, say forty years ago, philosophy took the problem of consciousness as one of the three major challenges faced by anyone attempting a theory of the relation between mind and body. (lrb.co.uk)
  • With a little ingenuity, he claims, consciousness can now be studied routinely: we have several 'signatures' of conscious thought in the activity of the brain, and a theory, descended from Baars's ideas, of what consciousness does for us, and why it exists. (lrb.co.uk)
  • social
  • They also have relatively weak governments and a poor social structure and often depend on primary industries as the main source of economic activity for the country. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since its beginnings the social sciences were an important part of the establishment of systems theory. (wikipedia.org)
  • References include Parsons' action theory and Luhmann's social systems theory. (wikipedia.org)
  • This contrast led to Herbert Spencer's theory of Social Darwinism and Lewis Henry Morgan's theory of cultural evolution. (wikipedia.org)
  • Moreover, The Theory of the Leisure Class is a socio-economic treatise that resulted from Veblen's observation and perception of the United States as a society of rapidly developing economic and social institutions. (wikipedia.org)
  • strength
  • 3, mathematicians in the Strength of Materials and Theory of Elasticity in 19th Century of computational conditions in the clean-up control of the download. (ecombinatii.ro)
  • RSS General out they can anyway make more because they move the thoughts of the mathematical Strength of Materials and Theory of culture invited in. (ecombinatii.ro)
  • Hull argued that "habit strength," a result of practiced stimulus-response (S-R) activities promoted by reward, was the essential aspect of learning, which he viewed as a gradual process. (britannica.com)
  • 20th century
  • The modeling of these interactions since the 1960s is briefly reviewed, analyzing the ubiquitous difficulty: incomputable combinatorial complexity (CC). Fundamental reasons for CC are related to the Gödel's difficulties of logic, a most fundamental mathematical result of the 20th century. (mdpi.com)
  • Due to a perceived lack of scientific rigor in an overly descriptive nature of the discipline, and a continued separation of geography from its two subfields of physical and human geography and from geology, geographers in the mid-20th century began to apply statistical and mathematical models in order to solve spatial problems. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the first half of the 20th century, Hartford City was able to attract several new manufacturers that became cornerstones for employment within the town, including Overhead Door and 3M. (wikipedia.org)
  • Social, political and economic developments of the late 19th and first half of the 20th century put into motion modern benefits and constraints for living and working. (wikipedia.org)
  • While philosophical thought pertaining to science dates back at least to the time of Aristotle, philosophy of science emerged as a distinct discipline only in the middle of the 20th century in the wake of the logical positivism movement, which aimed to formulate criteria for ensuring all philosophical statements' meaningfulness and objectively assessing them. (wikipedia.org)
  • With the advances in medical technologies and the coming of the Space Age of the 20th century, Puerto Ricans have expanded their horizons and have made many contributions in various scientific fields, among them the fields of aerospace and medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • 17th century
  • 17th century savants were a bit more "hands on" than modern day philosophers, but lens grinding was not a widespread skill amongst them (there were spectacle makers around, they could have asked them though). (blogspot.com)
  • Not all these treatments, are enjoyable, but pure luxury compared to what our 17th century sisters went through to improve their appearance. (blogspot.co.uk)
  • A 17th century lady was advised to use goose fat to shape up, whether to eat or smear on her wobbly bits is not specified, coupled with some non-strenuous exercise. (blogspot.co.uk)
  • early
  • During the first and second years, course modules introduce students to literary forms and theories, and texts and authors from the early 19th Century through to the present day. (lincoln.ac.uk)
  • Our carbon isotope time series from Caribbean sclerosponges start in the 15th century and show only very small variations until the early 19th century. (realclimate.org)
  • Research suggests that the manner in which resource income is spent, system of government, institutional quality, type of resources, and early vs. late industrialization all have been used to explain successes and failures. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the early 19th century, much of what would become the state of Indiana was still frequented by native Indian tribes. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the early 19th century, a settlement of the Munsee clan of the Delaware Indians was located about 19 miles south of the future Hartford City along the White River. (wikipedia.org)
  • Members of the Potawatomi tribe may have occasionally strayed into the (future Hartford City) area during the early 19th century, but they were supposed to stay north of the Wabash River, which is about 30 miles north of present-day Hartford City. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Hampton Mansion was the largest private home in America when it was completed in 1790 and today is considered to be one of the finest examples of Georgian architecture in the U.S. Its furnishings, together with the estate's slave quarters and other preserved structures, provide insight into the life of late 18th-century and early 19th-century landowning aristocracy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Norse
  • Since then, humans have repeatedly encountered the ice, from 11th century Novaya Zemlya, to the Norse colony in Medieval Greenland, to Henry Larsen 's 1944 transit of the Northwest Passage. (typepad.com)
  • 18th
  • Geography was not recognized as a formal academic discipline until the 18th century, although many scholars had undertaken geographical scholarship for much longer, particularly through cartography. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although the term "public domain" did not come into use until the mid-18th century, the concept "can be traced back to the ancient Roman Law, as a preset system included in the property right system. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, similar concepts were developed by British and French jurists in the 18th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • formal
  • The grounds were widely admired in the 19th century for their elaborate parterres or formal gardens, which have been restored to resemble their appearance during the 1820s. (wikipedia.org)
  • area
  • More importantly, the book title became the name of a distinct period of United States history and area of historical studies, which focuses on the years from 1870 to the turn of the twentieth century. (teachingcleveland.org)
  • Lyndhurst Terrace and the surrounding area were the location of some of the earliest brothels established in Hong Kong, in the mid-19th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Cantonese name of the street, 擺花 (pai fa) literally means "flower arrangement", possibly because of presence of numerous stalls in the area in the mid-19th century, selling flowers to the customers of the nearby brothels. (wikipedia.org)
  • A fourth tribe, the Kickapoo, may have lived in the area before the 19th Century, and Hartford City has a Kickapoo Street named in that tribe's honor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Design methods is a broad area that focuses on: Divergence - Exploring possibilities and constraints of inherited situations by applying critical thinking through qualitative and quantitative research methods to create new understanding (problem space) toward better design solutions Transformation - Redefining specifications of design solutions which can lead to better guidelines for traditional and contemporary design activities (architecture, graphic, industrial, information, interaction, et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • women
  • To together start a PMI project, cards must as be that they are been 19th-century None and % women. (weitz.org)
  • The download trizics teach yourself triz how to of a building has Seeking on the international heat of the river from 50 chemical Access women to component system thoughts for both Irreversibility aroma and Church typify not met, and may consult deleted or quality. (cdmw.de)
  • In the 21st Century, we are fortunate to have multi-billion pound companies who offer women - and men - every beauty aid imaginable to stave off the encroaching years. (blogspot.co.uk)
  • half
  • A similar concern with both human and physical aspects is apparent during the later 19th and first half of the 20th centuries focused on regional geography.The goal of regional geography, through something known as regionalisation, was to delineate space into regions and then understand and describe the unique characteristics of each region through both human and physical aspects. (wikipedia.org)
  • science
  • However, by the mid-19th century, environmental determinism was under attack for lacking methodological rigor associated with modern science, and later as a means to justify racism and imperialism. (wikipedia.org)
  • From 1958 to 1963 Horst Rittel was a pioneer in articulating the relationship between science and design, specifically the limitations of design processes based on the 19th century rational view of science, in his courses at Ulm School of Design in Germany (Hochschule für Gestaltung - HfG Ulm: 1953-1968). (wikipedia.org)
  • The central questions of this study concern what qualifies as science, the reliability of scientific theories, and the ultimate purpose of science. (wikipedia.org)
  • Physicist Richard Feynman coined the term "cargo cult science" for cases in which researchers believe they are doing science because their activities have the outward appearance of it but actually lack the "kind of utter honesty" that allows their results to be rigorously evaluated. (wikipedia.org)
  • made
  • This connection between both physical and human properties of geography is most apparent in the theory of environmental determinism, made popular in the 19th century by Carl Ritter and others, and has close links to the field of evolutionary biology of the time. (wikipedia.org)
  • Even if humans had musical instruments and made music there was a need for a musical notation system to be able to preserve song through writing. (wikipedia.org)
  • reactions
  • Scores of conditions, including pregnancy itself, as well as infections such as TB that are especially prevalent in Africa, have been shown to affect the immune system in ways that cause positive reactions with test kits used to diagnose "HIV" infection, but have nothing to do with HIV. (newmediaexplorer.org)
  • scientific
  • According to the party constitution, the CPC adheres to Marxism-Leninism, Mao Zedong Thought, socialism with Chinese characteristics, Deng Xiaoping Theory, Three Represents, the Scientific Outlook on Development and Xi Jinping Thought on Socialism with Chinese characteristics for a New Era. (wikipedia.org)
  • natural
  • Environmental determinism is the theory, that people's physical, mental and moral habits are directly due to the influence of their natural environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • forms
  • Together with the Ohio River and numerous other tributaries, it drains most of S central North America and forms the world's greatest inland waterway system. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • time
  • The decrease in the 13C/12C ratio can also be observed in century long time series of corals and sclerosponges from tropical reefs. (realclimate.org)
  • From that time on, prostitution was permitted within strict limits while prohibiting a whole host of activities surrounding prostitution, such as soliciting for sex and living off "immoral earnings" (working as a pimp). (wikipedia.org)
  • they spend the majority of their time in the water, but need to return to land for important activities such as mating, breeding and molting. (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • The role of design methods is to support design work, the aims of which can be varied, though they may include gaining key insights or unique essential truths resulting in more holistic solutions in order to achieve better experiences for users with products, services, environments and systems they rely upon. (wikipedia.org)
  • Function
  • These articles, written by Alexander Hamilton and James Madison, with some contributed by John Jay, examined the benefits of the new, proposed Constitution, and analyzed the political theory and function behind the various articles of the Constitution. (wikipedia.org)
  • modern
  • The cohomology Not uses on the systems of available spring, being modern people of request, Egyptian registrar items, literature tips, attention, and the midwest of Bolza. (ballroomchicago.com)
  • design
  • Rittel proposed principles for dealing with these limitations through his seminal HfG design methods courses: cybernetics, operational analysis and communication theory. (wikipedia.org)
  • He was in charge of the design of the communications systems of the "Global Precipitation Measurement" satellite. (wikipedia.org)
  • management
  • These centuries may help when you attempt getting a continued management of the Services or on another Channel. (weitz.org)
  • Physicochemical and microbial soil quality indicators as affected by the agricultural management system in strawberry cultivation using straw or black polyethylene mulching. (uni-koblenz-landau.de)
  • shape
  • Other proteins have structural or mechanical functions, such as those that form the cytoskeleton, a system of scaffolding that maintains the cell shape. (wikipedia.org)
  • order
  • You must be a giant Origin by the Fees Deadline were in your ia system or your internet may run served to another order. (keepergoals.com)
  • research
  • Graves has put together a lot of research on the existence and the activities of a classified "special virus program" and he contends that HIV is the upshot of that program and is used in a genocidal campaign to wipe out blacks. (newmediaexplorer.org)
  • Dr. Cruz is a senior aerospace engineer in the Exploration Systems Engineering Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center. (wikipedia.org)
  • His responsibilities are focused on research and development of entry, descent, and landing (EDL) systems for robotic and human exploration missions. (wikipedia.org)