• psychiatric
  • This article is being co-published by Depression and Anxiety and the American Psychiatric Association. (wiley.com)
  • Comorbid psychiatric disorders in children with autism: interview development and rates of disorders. (springer.com)
  • Simonoff E, Pickles A, Charman T, Chandler S, Loucas T, Baird G. Psychiatric disorders in children with autism spectrum disorders: prevalence, comorbidity, and associated factors in a population-derived sample. (springer.com)
  • Validation of DSM-IV model of psychiatric syndromes in children with autism spectrum disorders. (springer.com)
  • Stammering (also called stuttering) is a fluency disorder that results in involuntary disruptions of a person's verbal utterances when, for example, they are speaking or reading aloud ( American Psychiatric Association, 1994 ). (rcpsych.org)
  • Although stammering is classified in DSM-IV as a disorder that is typically first diagnosed in childhood ( American Psychiatric Association, 1994 ), it is found in all age-groups. (rcpsych.org)
  • Over the past 15 years there has been renewed interest in the relationship between stammering and its potential psychiatric consequences such as chronic and social anxiety. (rcpsych.org)
  • The American Psychiatric Association in 1980 first defined generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) as a condition characterised by worry combined with somatised anxiety. (rcpsych.org)
  • In addition, they were excluded if they had any clinically important medical disease or abnormality on physical examination as well as other psychiatric disorders, excessive consumption of caffeine-containing food and drink and use of pharmacological or non-pharmacological drugs with psychotropic effects as checked with a drug screen. (rcpsych.org)
  • Non-random patterns of diagnostic comorbidity among some combinations of psychiatric disorders are common and likely meaningful. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • for example, 79% of persons diagnosed with a lifetime psychiatric disorder also met criteria for at least one other psychiatric disorder during their lifetime. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Additionally, a comparatively small proportion of the NCS sample (14%) that reported a psychiatric history of three or more comorbid disorders accounted for 59% of all diagnosed lifetime disorders. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Such patterns of comorbidity among psychiatric disorders highlight possible common etiological processes, genetic influences, or maintaining factors among subsets of disorders, and may also have implications for treatment selection and responsiveness to specific therapies ( Krueger, 1999 ). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • In several recent reports, confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) methods have been used to evaluate competing hierarchical models of psychiatric disorders based on concurrent, 12-month, or lifetime diagnostic comorbidity. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • A frequent assumption underlying this research is that the resultant measurement models reveal a "liability spectrum," whereby certain psychiatric disorders are regarded as expressions of latent liabilities that, in turn, explain diagnostic comorbidity or the increased risk for spectrum-related disorders during one's lifetime ( Krueger & Markon, 2006 ). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Acute pandysautonomia may cause emotional instability and has been misdiagnosed as various psychiatric disorders including hysterical neurosis and anorexia nervosa. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lyme disease is known as the "great imitator", as it may present as a variety of psychiatric or neurologic disorders including anorexia nervosa. (wikipedia.org)
  • ADAA describes itself as having an "internationally renowned board certified psychiatrists and psychologists, social workers and psychiatric nurses. (cchrint.org)
  • As a milestone in its history and "achievements," it notes that the year it was formed the American Psychiatric Association issued "version III of its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders " (DSM) and "for the first time in history defines and differentiates anxiety disorders as specific illnesses that can be diagnosed and treated. (cchrint.org)
  • One of the advisory board members of ADAA is Michael R. Liebowitz Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at the College of Physician and Surgeons at Columbia University and director of the Anxiety Disorders Clinic of the New York State Psychiatric Institute. (cchrint.org)
  • Royal College of Nursing Royal College of Psychiatrists (Honorary) Academy of Medical Sciences Royal Society of Medicine Associate Fellow of the British Psychological Society CBE : Queens New Year's Honours 1999 Honorary Doctor of Science Nurse of the Year (American Psychiatric Nursing Association, 2004) He originally trained as a Behaviour Therapist at the Maudsley Hospital between 1976- 1978 on the famous Nurse Therapy Programme, directed by Professor Isaac Marks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alexithymia is considered to be a personality trait that places affected individuals at risk for other medical and psychiatric disorders while reducing the likelihood that these individuals will respond to conventional treatments for the other conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is distinct from the psychiatric personality disorders, such as antisocial personality disorder or borderline personality disorder, with which it shares some characteristics, and is likewise distinct from the abnormal conditions of sociopathy or psychopathy. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS) is a short questionnaire developed in 1987 by Michael Liebowitz, a psychiatrist and researcher at Columbia University and the New York State Psychiatric Institute. (wikipedia.org)
  • The obsessive-compulsive spectrum is a model of medical classification where various psychiatric, neurological and/or medical conditions are described as existing on a spectrum of conditions related to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). (wikipedia.org)
  • severe
  • Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by gastrointestinal dysmotility, severe cachexia progressive external ophthalmoplegia, post-prandial emesis (vomiting after eating), peripheral neuropathy, and diffuse leukoencephalopathy. (wikipedia.org)
  • childhood
  • Psychopathology of childhood social phobia. (asha.org)
  • A parent-teacher universal prevention program for children aged 4 to 5 years, aimed at reducing the incidence of internalising disorders later in childhood, was recently evaluated in Brisbane, Australia ( Roth & Dadds, submitted ). (health.gov.au)
  • A study of the relationship between childhood Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and childhood perceptions of family functioning (Doctoral dissertation, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1999). (szapkiw.com)
  • Typically, this disease is presaged by a childhood history of social inhibition and shyness. (wikipedia.org)
  • significantly
  • The attention given to social anxiety disorder has significantly increased since 1999 with the approval and marketing of drugs for its treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Further, the identification of appropriate and effective psychosocial and pharmacological treatments for children with ASD significantly lags behind these same efforts for typically developing children with anxiety disorders, leaving many questions about how to best address anxiety in this population once it has been diagnosed. (springer.com)
  • 1992) found that scores on the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale were significantly correlated with scores of two other scales, which had demonstrated significant reliability and validity in several studies before. (wikipedia.org)
  • typically
  • An individualized, evidence-based approach that utilizes established dosing and appropriate duration of therapeutic trial (typically six to 12 weeks) for each anxiety disorder is needed for treatment success. (psychiatrictimes.com)
  • One of these subfactors is usually labeled "distress" or "mood," and typically defined by depressive disorders (i.e., major depressive disorder, dysthymia) and generalized anxiety disorder. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Humans are social beings by nature, as they typically have a fundamental need and desire to maintain positive social relationships. (wikipedia.org)
  • Social stress is typically the most frequent type of stressor that people experience in their daily lives and affects people more intensely than other types of stressors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Social stress is typically measured through self-report questionnaires. (wikipedia.org)
  • behavior
  • Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders -characterized by impairments in social and communication skills as well as restricted interests and stereotyped behavior. (springer.com)
  • A two-factor model that distinguished oppositional behavior disorders (attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder) from social norm violation disorders (conduct disorder, adult antisocial behavior, alcohol use disorder, cannabis use disorder, hard drug use disorder) demonstrated consistently good fit and superior approximating abilities. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • An example of a safety behavior in social anxiety is to think of excuses to escape a potentially uncomfortable situation. (wikipedia.org)
  • By avoiding the situation through the use of safety behaviors, the user is unable to realize that the situation is harmless, allowing the cycle of anxiety and behavior to continue. (wikipedia.org)
  • The disorders are thought to lie on a spectrum from impulsive to compulsive where impulsivity is said to persist due to deficits in the ability to inhibit repetitive behavior with known negative consequences, while compulsivity persists as a consequence of deficits in recognizing completion of tasks. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2001
  • A World Health Organization study found that recognition of comorbidity in anxiety disorders was a key reason for preferentially prescribing antidepressants rather than benzodiazepines in most primary care practices worldwide (Lecrubier, 2001). (psychiatrictimes.com)
  • behavioural
  • Supportive therapy, muscle relaxation and cognitive-behavioural techniques have some evidence of effectiveness for up to 6 months ( Fisher & Durham, 1999 ). (rcpsych.org)
  • comorbidity
  • To address this apparent contradiction, confirmatory factor analytic methods and information-theoretic criteria were used to evaluate four theoretically plausible measurement models based on lifetime comorbidity patterns of seven putative externalizing disorders. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • embarrassment
  • As a result of these feelings, they also experience persistent suffering in the form of emotional distress through shame, embarrassment, anxiety, fear, and other tense feelings that occur when confronted with social circumstances. (wikipedia.org)
  • Social phobia is defined by a persistent fear of embarrassment or negative evaluation while engaged in social interaction or public performance. (wikipedia.org)
  • major depression
  • These associations persisted after adjusting for major sociodemographic factors, and sex plays a significant role in the association between cancer diagnosis and mental disorder, with cancer diagnosis having a stronger influence on major depression and drug dependence in men than in women. (karger.com)
  • shyness
  • Behavioral characteristics may include stereotypic movements (e.g., hand-flapping) and atypical social development, particularly shyness, limited eye contact, memory problems, and difficulty with face encoding. (wikipedia.org)
  • sufferers
  • However, instead of a fear of embarrassing themselves or being harshly judged by others because of their social ineptness, sufferers of taijin kyofusho report a fear of offending or harming other people. (wikipedia.org)
  • interventions
  • However, the evidence for the use of primary, secondary, indicated or selected interventions for internalising disorders in this age group is scarce. (health.gov.au)
  • specific
  • The social penetration theory is known as an objective theory as opposed to an interpretive theory, meaning that it is based on data drawn from experiments and not from conclusions based on individuals' specific experiences. (wikipedia.org)
  • Depression
  • Clinicians and community health workers working with cancer survivors need to be not only alert for signs of clinical depression but also of co-occurring drug dependence and certain anxiety disorders so that appropriate referrals to mental health professionals can be made. (karger.com)
  • therapy
  • Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are broad-spectrum anti-anxiety agents considered first-line therapy for all major anxiety disorders. (psychiatrictimes.com)
  • PII: S 0 0 0 5 - 7 9 6 7 ( 9 9 ) 0 0 0 4 8 - 0 S6 D.M. Clark / Behaviour Research and Therapy 37 (1999) S5±S27 However, before discussing possible answers, it is perhaps worth mentioning some observations that highlight why the question is interesting. (spotidoc.com)
  • Behavioral
  • Behavioral and emotional adjustment, family functioning, academic performance, and social relationships in children with selective mutism. (asha.org)
  • When stress becomes chronic, one experiences emotional, behavioral, and physiological changes that can put one under greater risk for developing a mental disorder and physical illness. (wikipedia.org)