• 1998
  • Denver: National Indian Health Board, 1998. (hhs.gov)
  • Noren J, Kindig D, Sprenger A. "Challenges to Native American Health Care", Public Health Reports 1998, 113:22-33. (hhs.gov)
  • citation needed] By 1998, the President announced new steps for federal oversight including monitoring of poor performance, collection of new fees, and increased focus on nutrition and basic personal care like pressure sores. (wikipedia.org)
  • He was awarded the American Broncho-Esophagological Association- Broyles-Maloney Award-1995, the Honor Award- American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery in 1997, The Maxwell Abramson Memorial Award for Excellence in Teaching and Service- Columbia University- 1997/1998. (wikipedia.org)
  • World Health Organ
  • Due to lack of appropriate vaccine stock to prevent the killer disease, World Health Organization is asking vaccine manufacturers about the usage of lower dose for upcoming Meningitis disease outbreak season (2008-2009) - Science, December, 2008 and ScienceDaily (Dec. 6, 2008). (wikipedia.org)
  • maternal
  • Healthier mothers and babies have resulted from better hygiene and nutrition, availability of antibiotics, greater access to health care, and technologic advances in maternal and neonatal medicine. (cdc.gov)
  • Unintended pregnancy has been linked to numerous maternal and child health problems. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1999
  • Moreover, these studies used data from 1987-1999, when foreign-born persons represented a minority of TB cases in the United States. (biomedcentral.com)
  • To highlight these advances, MMWR will profile 10 public health achievements (see box) in a series of reports published through December 1999. (cdc.gov)
  • Fluoridation of drinking water began in 1945 and in 1999 reaches an estimated 144 million persons in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • To monitor recent increasing trends in the number of hysterectomies performed in the United States, data from the 1994--1999 National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) were analyzed. (cdc.gov)
  • 1965
  • Arthur E. Hess, a deputy commissioner of the Social Security Administration, was named as first director of the Bureau of Health Insurance in 1965, placing him as the first executive in charge of the Medicare program. (wikipedia.org)
  • asthma
  • Physical training is not associated with worsening of asthma symptoms, and it improves health-related quality of life. (aafp.org)
  • 2 Despite being treatable, asthma was responsible for 10.5 million missed school days and 14.2 million missed work days in 2008, and was responsible for 1.75 million emergency department visits and 456,000 hospitalizations in 2007. (aafp.org)
  • This Cochrane review examined the effect of medically supervised physical training on the health of persons with asthma. (aafp.org)
  • Outcomes included physiologic measurements, exercise capacity, and measures of asthma severity and health-related quality of life. (aafp.org)
  • Learning how to manage asthma as a chronic disease is a major challenge for patients, as well as for health care providers and others involved in asthma care. (hhs.gov)
  • An epidemic of asthma is underway in the United States. (hhs.gov)
  • Even if rates were to stabilize, asthma would continue to be a profound public health problem. (hhs.gov)
  • For the past 15 years, an epidemic of asthma has been underway in the United States. (hhs.gov)
  • National survey data - the responses of randomly selected US residents when asked whether they had symptoms of physician-diagnosed asthma in the previous 12 months -- indicate that the number of people with asthma in the United States has more than doubled in the past 15 years (see figure 1). (hhs.gov)
  • In the United States, the prevalence of asthma is slightly higher in boys than in girls under age 18. (hhs.gov)
  • Average number of deaths with asthma as the underlying cause of death diagnosis, by age group, United States, Underlying Cause of Death dataset, 1960-1995. (hhs.gov)
  • 1994
  • chYps started life in 1994 as the Children & Young Peoples' Service of EllenorLions Hospices in North West Kent ( Dartford, Gravesend, Swanley). (wikipedia.org)
  • calculate
  • Our study used TB data from a more recent time period (1996-2005) to calculate and compare rates of TB in U.S.-born and foreign-born populations by population measures of SES. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Pre-conception counseling in the United States is recommended to include: Height and weight to calculate BMI Blood pressure Medical history Abdominal and pelvic examination Rubella screening Varicella screening Domestic violence screening Depression screening Testing for gonorrhea and chlamydia for women at high risk for STDs It is recommended that all pregnant women receive influenza vaccination during flu season. (wikipedia.org)
  • tuberculosis
  • In addition, the discovery of antimicrobial therapy has been critical to successful public health efforts to control infections such as tuberculosis and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). (cdc.gov)
  • categorical
  • Prior residential facility classifications were described by Scheerenberger until the modern day classification by David Braddock on a state-by-state basis which includes individuals in residential settings of six or fewer, one categorical group. (wikipedia.org)
  • Intermediate care facilities (small) were developed by the state categorical systems (intellectual disabilities, mental health), back in the 1970s, as a reaction to exposés on institutional conditions resulting in required active treatment in institutions and the new building of community facilities recommended under 16 in size. (wikipedia.org)
  • families
  • The CCDP was designed to provide intensive, comprehensive, integrated, and continuous support services for children from low-income families from birth, or before, through their entrance into elementary school, to enhance their intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development. (umich.edu)
  • The MIS was designed to monitor the nature and number of services received by families participating in each of the CCDP projects. (umich.edu)
  • National charity, Together For Short Lives wants the best possible care for children and young people who are not expected to live to reach adulthood and their families. (wikipedia.org)
  • They have a clear focus: to enable children and young people with life-limiting and life-threatening conditions to receive full hospice care in their and their families' place of choice, which is overwhelmingly their own home. (wikipedia.org)
  • This general objective was addressed through a prospective, longitudinal study of the experiences of 1,364 children and their families, which took into account the complex interactions among child characteristics and those of the human and physical environments in which the children were reared. (umich.edu)
  • Provide a natural history of infant care in the 1990s, and help establish a baseline of data pertaining to the kinds of care being used by families. (umich.edu)
  • One of the most valuable aspects of the collaborative study is the opportunity it provides to obtain a more complete and accurate picture of patterns of infant care used by families today. (umich.edu)
  • In a "System of Care," local organizations work in teams-with families as critical partners-to provide a full range of services to children and adolescents with serious emotional disturbances. (mental-health-matters.com)
  • Medicare" was the name originally given to a program providing medical care for families of individuals serving in the military as part of the Dependents' Medical Care Act passed in 1956. (wikipedia.org)
  • reform
  • HUPAC is a licensed political action committee that raises money for candidates who support business-driven health care reform. (wikipedia.org)
  • Assisted living came from community living (CL) groups (not from the nursing home industry) who advocated for the separation of facility funding to home and supports in the communities (for information on residential services and reform, see supportive housing and supported living). (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Nursing homes have been the subject of decades of efforts by states and at the national levels to reform health and residential care for "frail" elders, especially those with lower incomes in the US. (wikipedia.org)
  • Along with the Departments of Labor and Treasury, CMS also implements the insurance reform provisions of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) and most aspects of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) of 2010 as amended. (wikipedia.org)
  • utilization
  • MIS data is composed of 23 data collection forms spanning 4 broad categories: (1) CCDP grantee administration, (2) CCDP program descriptions, (3) CCDP family characteristics and service plans, and (4) CCDP services utilization. (umich.edu)
  • children
  • Prior to the formation of FAA Tuvalu, there were no services for disabled children in the country. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1983, of the 1,400 hospices in the United States, only four were able to accept children. (wikipedia.org)
  • Scholars define "voluntarily childless" women as "women of childbearing age who are fertile and state that they do not intend to have children, women of childbearing age who have chosen sterilization, or women past childbearing age who were fertile but chose not to have children. (wikipedia.org)
  • States that have legalized abortions and easier access to abortions have lower rates of child neglect and better living conditions for children overall. (wikipedia.org)
  • Which can be attributed to the fact that children in those states are more likely to be wanted when they are born. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some states use other names, often attempting to reflect more family-centered (as opposed to child-centered) practices, such as "Department of Children & Family Services" (DCFS). (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1692, states and municipalities identified care for abused and neglected children as the responsibility of local government and private institutions. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1825, states enacted laws giving social-welfare agencies the right to remove neglected children from their parents and from the streets. (wikipedia.org)
  • Examining whether individual differences among children moderate the effects of infant care on child development. (umich.edu)
  • Whereas other national databases, such as those provided by the United States Census Bureau, provide static estimates of the number of children in different types of childcare, this network study supplements that knowledge with longitudinal data on successive enrollments into day care at various ages, patterns of arrangements used concurrently and over time, and the stability of arrangements during the first three years of life. (umich.edu)
  • According to Loppie and Wien, these health afflictions of poverty most burden outlying groups such as women, children, ethnic minorities, and the disabled. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this fact sheet, " mental health Problems" for children and adolescents refers to the range of all diagnosable emotional, behavioral, and mental disorders . (mental-health-matters.com)
  • Many mental health care providers use "talk" treatments to help children and adolescents with depression. (mental-health-matters.com)
  • Medicare
  • In the United States, Medicare is a single-payer, national social insurance program administered by the U.S. federal government since 1966, currently[when? (wikipedia.org)
  • not in citation given] United States Medicare is funded by a payroll tax, premiums and surtaxes from beneficiaries, and general revenue. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2015, Medicare provided health insurance for over 55 million-46 million people age 65 and older and 9 million younger people. (wikipedia.org)
  • On average, Medicare covers about half of the health care charges for those enrolled. (wikipedia.org)
  • Out-of-pocket costs can vary depending on the amount of health care a Medicare enrollee needs. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1966, Medicare spurred the racial integration of thousands of waiting rooms, hospital floors, and physician practices by making payments to health care providers conditional on desegregation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medicare added the option of payments to health maintenance organizations in the 1980s. (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • In 2014, typologies of residential services in intellectual disabilities include new categories of supported living, personal assistance services, individual and family support, and supported employment. (wikipedia.org)
  • They might include the costs of uncovered services-such as for long-term, dental, hearing, and vision care-and supplemental insurance premiums. (wikipedia.org)
  • programs
  • The Comprehensive Child Development Act also mandated that programs collect data on the individuals and geographic areas served, including the types of services provided, the estimated costs of providing comprehensive services, the types and nature of conditions and needs identified and met, and other information that may be required. (umich.edu)
  • Identifying essential micronutrients and establishing food-fortification programs have almost eliminated major nutritional deficiency diseases such as rickets, goiter, and pellagra in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • The objective was to bring together in one agency all federal programs in the fields of health, education, and social security. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition to these programs, CMS has other responsibilities, including the administrative simplification standards from the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), quality standards in long-term care facilities (more commonly referred to as nursing homes) through its survey and certification process, clinical laboratory quality standards under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments, and oversight of HealthCare.gov. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bureau
  • These responsibilities were entrusted to the Bureau of Chemistry in the Department of Agriculture in 1907 and were organized into a Food, Drug and Insecticide Administration in 1927, renamed the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1931. (wikipedia.org)
  • mental health
  • Tuvalu implemented a mental health policy for the country in 1978. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mental Health Atlas: 476-477. (wikipedia.org)
  • The study examined the moderating effects of parents' values and attitudes, psychological adjustment and mental health, stress and social support, child-rearing practices, time use, interactions with the child, the marital relationship, and family demographics. (umich.edu)
  • Family relationships, parental mental health, family stress, and so on, are not just inputs to child development or moderators of childcare effects, they are also outcomes. (umich.edu)
  • Mental health problems affect one in every five young people at any given time. (mental-health-matters.com)
  • This young person is also at risk for other mental health problems. (mental-health-matters.com)
  • 1990s
  • Board and Care homes were the subject of exposés for lacking medical personnel at the time of the 1990s reviews. (wikipedia.org)
  • oversees
  • In addition, the Mayor oversees all city services, public property, police and fire protection, most public agencies, and the District of Columbia Public Schools. (wikipedia.org)
  • Administration
  • Like controlled substances, cannabinoids developed for medical use encounter a gauntlet of public health regulatory controls administered by two federal agencies: the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) of the U.S. Department of Justice. (nap.edu)
  • using about 30-50 private insurance companies across the United States under contract for administration. (wikipedia.org)
  • It also provides health insurance to younger people with some disability status as determined by the Social Security Administration, as well as people with end stage renal disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Carolyn W. Colvin (born May 27, 1942 in Arnold, Maryland) was the Acting Commissioner of Social Security Administration in the United States, appointed on February 14, 2013, having succeeded Michael J. Astrue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Colvin is a graduate of Morgan State University with a BS in Business Administration and an MBA. (wikipedia.org)
  • quality
  • They are a charitable organisation, a member of ACT and registered with the Care Quality Commission. (wikipedia.org)
  • Four out of five studies demonstrated a positive effect on health-related quality of life. (aafp.org)
  • By 2000, minimum staffing ratios and implementation of Nursing Home Quality of Care were introduced. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is important because health quality, health distribution, and social protection of health in a population affect the development status of a nation. (wikipedia.org)
  • mortality
  • Final Report: Methodology for Adjusting IHS Mortality Data for Inconsistent Classification of Race-Ethnicity of American Indians and Alaska Natives Between State Death Certificate and HIS Patient Registration Records. (hhs.gov)
  • Callahan followed up on Setting Limits with a series of books on health care, aging, technology, and mortality. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to Moss, socioeconomic factors that affect impoverished populations such as education, income inequality, and occupation, represent the strongest and most consistent predictors of health and mortality. (wikipedia.org)
  • Group
  • A group home is a private residence model of medical care for those with complex health needs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Originally, the term group home referred to homes of 8 to 16 individuals, which was a state-mandated size during deinstitutionalization. (wikipedia.org)
  • Residents of group homes usually have a disability, such as autism, intellectual disability, chronic or long-term mental/psychiatric disorder, or physical or even multiple disabilities because those are the non-profit and state-regional organizations which began and operated the homes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Board and care homes have never been approved by community planning as intermediate care facilities (ICFs), or even the emblematic group homes, often falling far short at health and community gates. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research
  • This study is provided by Child Care & Early Education Research Connections . (umich.edu)
  • Management Information System Data For research and monitoring purposes, the CCDP mandated that all contacts and services must be recorded and entered into the management information system (MIS). (umich.edu)
  • Public Law 93-247) providing federal funding for wide-ranging federal and state child-maltreatment research and services. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Belmont Report is a report created by the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its full title is the Belmont Report: Ethical Principles and Guidelines for the Protection of Human Subjects of Research, Report of the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Belmont Report summarizes ethical principles and guidelines for research involving human subjects. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Belmont Report was first written by the National Commission for the Protection of Human Services of Biomedical and Behavioral Research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prompted in part by problems arising from the Tuskegee Syphilis Study (1932-1972) and based on the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research (1974-1978), the Department of Health, Education and Welfare (HEW) revised and expanded its regulations for the protection of human subjects 45 CFR part 46 in the late 1970s and early 1980s. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1978, the Commission's report Ethical Principles and Guidelines for the Protection of Human Subjects of Research was released, and it was published in 1979 in the Federal Register. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Belmont Report is one of the leading works concerning ethics and health care research. (wikipedia.org)
  • The three fundamental ethical principles for using any human subjects for research are: Respect for persons: protecting the autonomy of all people and treating them with courtesy and respect and allowing for informed consent. (wikipedia.org)
  • Today, the Belmont Report continues as an essential reference for institutional review boards (IRBs) that review HHS-conducted or -supported human subjects research proposals involving human subjects, in order to ensure that the research meets the ethical foundations of the regulations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also in the case someone did not want to participate in research but would like treatment they cannot be turned away and must be treated with the same standard care. (wikipedia.org)
  • L. 93-348) was signed into law, there-by creating the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). (wikipedia.org)
  • time
  • If you have comments concerning the accuracy of the time estimate(s) or suggestions for improving this form, please write to: U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, OS/OCIO/PRA, 200 Independence Ave., S.W., Suite 336-E, Washington D.C. 20201, Attention: PRA Reports Clearance Officer. (hhs.gov)
  • million
  • An estimated 97 million adults in the United States are overweight or obese. (ahajournals.org)
  • Approximately 600,000 hysterectomies are performed annually in the United States, and approximately 20 million U.S. women have had a hysterectomy. (cdc.gov)
  • JN-International Medical Corporation in Ivory Coast has provided over 5 million doses of serotypes A & C vaccine on long term credit to the Ministry of Health of Niger, Burkina Faso, Benin and Ivory Coast during meningitis disease outbreak seasons since the year 2006. (wikipedia.org)
  • reproductive
  • However, access to contraception and abortion, new economic and educational opportunities, and changing ideas about motherhood have led to new reproductive experiences for women in the United States, particularly for women who choose to be childless. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hysterectomy is the second most frequently performed surgical procedure, after cesarean section, for women of reproductive age in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • pregnancy
  • and the use of barrier contraceptives to prevent pregnancy and transmission of human immunodeficiency virus and other STDs. (cdc.gov)
  • Physicians will also conduct ultrasounds to monitor the baby's health periodically throughout the pregnancy. (wikipedia.org)
  • adults
  • Before Medicare's creation, approximately 60% of those over 65 had health insurance, with coverage often unavailable or unaffordable to many others, because older adults paid more than three times as much for health insurance as younger people. (wikipedia.org)
  • Public Health
  • Many notable public health achievements have occurred during the 1900s, and other accomplishments could have been selected for the list. (cdc.gov)
  • The new agency originally consisted of the following major components: (1) Office of the Administrator, (2) Public Health Service (PHS), (3) Office of Education, (4) Civilian Conservation Corps, and (5) Social Security Board. (wikipedia.org)
  • On August 14, 1912, the name was changed to the Public Health Service (PHS). (wikipedia.org)
  • social
  • CPS is also known by the name of "Department of Social Services" (DSS) or simply "Social Services. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1958, amendments to the Social Security Act mandated that states fund child protection efforts. (wikipedia.org)
  • The social determinants of health in poverty describe the factors that affect impoverished populations' health and health inequality. (wikipedia.org)
  • Inequalities in health stem from the conditions of people's lives, including living conditions, work environment, age, and other social factors, and how these affect people's ability to respond to illness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Daily living conditions work together with these structural drivers to result in the social determinants of health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Social determinants of health - like child development, education, living and working conditions, and healthcare- are of special importance to the impoverished. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, the conditions of individual's daily life are responsible for the social determinants of health and a major part of health inequities between and within countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since health has been considered a fundamental human right, one author suggests the social determinants of health determine the distribution of human dignity. (wikipedia.org)
  • More generally, the WHO considers the circumstances of daily life and structural drivers, which determine health outcome differentials, as the social determinants of health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Different exposures and vulnerabilities to disease and injury determined by social, occupational, and physical environments and conditions, result in more or less vulnerability to poor health. (wikipedia.org)
  • These themes are condensed into a distinct structure of defining the social determinants of health in poverty. (wikipedia.org)
  • The World Health Organization's Social Determinants Council recognized two distinct forms of social determinants for health- social position and socioeconomic and political context. (wikipedia.org)
  • The following divisions are adapted from World Health Organization's Social Determinants Conceptual Framework for explaining and understanding social determinants of health. (wikipedia.org)
  • President Eisenhower held the first White House Conference on Aging in January 1961, in which the creation of a program of health care for social security beneficiaries was proposed. (wikipedia.org)
  • child care
  • Tribal Child Care. (hhs.gov)
  • Outrage over this case started an organized effort against child maltreatment In 1909, President Theodore Roosevelt convened the White House Conference on Child Dependency, which created a publicly funded volunteer organization to "establish and publicize standards of child care. (wikipedia.org)
  • data
  • This is the accessible text file for GAO report number GAO-11-268 entitled 'Private Health Insurance: Data on Application and Coverage Denials' which was released on March 16, 2011. (gao.gov)
  • GAO reviewed the data available on denials of (1) applications for enrollment and (2) coverage for medical services. (gao.gov)
  • GAO reviewed newly available nationwide data collected by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) from 459 insurers operating in the individual market on application denials from January through March 2010. (gao.gov)
  • GAO also reviewed a year or more of the available data from six states on the rates of application and coverage denials and the rates and outcomes of appeals related to coverage denials. (gao.gov)
  • The six states included all states identified by experts and in the literature as collecting data on the rates of application or coverage denials and together represented over 20 percent of private health insurance enrollment nationally. (gao.gov)
  • GAO interviewed HHS and state officials and researchers about factors to consider when interpreting the data. (gao.gov)
  • Data reported by Maryland the only of the six states in GAO s review identified as collecting data on the incidence of application denials indicated that variation in application denial rates across insurers has occurred for several years, with rates ranging from about 6 percent to over 30 percent in each of 3 years. (gao.gov)
  • The available data from the six states in GAO s review and others indicated that the rates of coverage denials, including rates of denials of preauthorizations and claims, also varied significantly. (gao.gov)
  • The state data indicated that coverage denial rates varied significantly across states, with aggregate rates of claim denials ranging from 11 percent to 24 percent across the three states that collected such data. (gao.gov)
  • In addition, rates varied significantly across insurers, with data from one state indicating a range in claim denial rates from 6 percent to 40 percent across six large insurers operating in the state. (gao.gov)
  • Child Status Data -- are comprised of information related to child health status. (umich.edu)
  • Data from the NHDS conducted by CDC's National Center for Health Statistics were analyzed. (cdc.gov)
  • Methods
  • Health professionals instruct mothers on prenatal nutrition, the benefits of breastfeeding, life style changes, injury and illness prevention, and methods to monitor potentially dangerous health conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • The methods of manufacture of the vaccine product is now patented in the United States (USPTO) and in the WIPO Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) countries. (wikipedia.org)