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  • 1989
  • Data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 1989-1990 revealed that there were almost 15 million office visits for low back pain, ranking this as the fifth reason for all physician visits. (medscape.com)
  • 1999
  • To highlight these advances, MMWR will profile 10 public health achievements (see box) in a series of reports published through December 1999. (cdc.gov)
  • Fewer than 25 percent of children in the United States get at least 30 minutes of any kind of daily physical activity (International Life Sciences Institute, 1997), and fewer than 30 percent of U.S. high school students attend physical education class every day (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1999). (ascd.org)
  • She completed residency in 1999 in internal medicine at the Weill Cornell Medical Center and subsequently completed a combined fellowship in infectious diseases at Johns Hopkins University and critical care medicine at the National Institutes of Health. (wikipedia.org)
  • maternal
  • To characterize costs by state, CDC analyzed pregnancy risk surveillance and birth certificate data to estimate the association between maternal smoking and the probability of infant admission to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). (cdc.gov)
  • This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which estimated smoking-attributable neonatal expenditures (SAEs) of $366 million in the United States in 1996, or $704 per maternal smoker ( 2 ), and indicated wide variations in SAEs among states. (cdc.gov)
  • CDC has incorporated this analysis into its Maternal and Child Health Smoking-Attributable Mortality, Morbidity, and Economic Costs (MCH SAMMEC) software, which generates estimates of the smoking-attributable fraction of neonatal expenditures and provides area-specific estimates of SAEs for all women giving birth and for selected subsets of that population. (cdc.gov)
  • MCH SAMMEC used national and state-specific maternal smoking prevalence estimates for 1997 by using birth certificate data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics from all areas except California, Indiana, New York state (outside of New York City), and South Dakota. (cdc.gov)
  • For California, MCH SAMMEC used Maternal and Infant Health Assessment data. (cdc.gov)
  • The MCH SAMMEC software provided a national estimate of smoking-attributable neonatal expenditures of $366 million in 1996, or $704 per maternal smoker ( 2 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Among black mothers in these 13 states, smoking prevalence ranged from 6.7% to 21.3%, and SAE per maternal smoker ranged from $1,008 to $1,403. (cdc.gov)
  • Parent/Family Data -- contain information about household composition and stability, economic self-sufficiency, maternal physical and psychological health, parenting, coping and life skills, early childhood services, health care services, and case management. (umich.edu)
  • Healthier mothers and babies have resulted from better hygiene and nutrition, availability of antibiotics, greater access to health care, and technologic advances in maternal and neonatal medicine. (cdc.gov)
  • Unintended pregnancy has been linked to numerous maternal and child health problems. (wikipedia.org)
  • Congress
  • Consequently, in accordance with the Reorganization Act of 1949, President Eisenhower submitted to the Congress on March 12, 1953, Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1953, which called for the dissolution of the Federal Security Agency and elevation of the agency to Cabinet status as the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike statutes authorizing the creation of other executive departments, the contents of Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1953 were never properly codified within the United States Code, although Congress did codify a later statute ratifying the Plan. (wikipedia.org)
  • United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families Program (TANF), Fourth Annual Report to Congress, Washington DC: DHHS, April 2002. (hhs.gov)
  • NAHU has taken an active role in Health care reform in the United States, including presenting testimony before Congress and participating in lobbying efforts. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1980, Congress passed the first comprehensive federal child protective services act, the Adoption Assistance and Child Welfare Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-272), which focused on family preservation efforts to help keep families together and children out of foster care or other out-of-home placement options. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Government of the District of Columbia operates under Article One of the United States Constitution and the District of Columbia Home Rule Act, which devolves certain powers of the United States Congress to the Mayor and thirteen-member Council. (wikipedia.org)
  • Established in 1970, it is equivalent to a state supreme court, except that its authority is derived from the United States Congress rather than from the inherent sovereignty of the states. (wikipedia.org)
  • In July 1965, under the leadership of President Lyndon Johnson, Congress enacted Medicare under Title XVIII of the Social Security Act to provide health insurance to people age 65 and older, regardless of income or medical history. (wikipedia.org)
  • World Health Organ
  • Due to lack of appropriate vaccine stock to prevent the killer disease, World Health Organization is asking vaccine manufacturers about the usage of lower dose for upcoming Meningitis disease outbreak season (2008-2009) - Science, December, 2008 and ScienceDaily (Dec. 6, 2008). (wikipedia.org)
  • 1965
  • Arthur E. Hess, a deputy commissioner of the Social Security Administration, was named as first director of the Bureau of Health Insurance in 1965, placing him as the first executive in charge of the Medicare program. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mortality
  • Final Report: Methodology for Adjusting IHS Mortality Data for Inconsistent Classification of Race-Ethnicity of American Indians and Alaska Natives Between State Death Certificate and HIS Patient Registration Records. (hhs.gov)
  • Callahan followed up on Setting Limits with a series of books on health care, aging, technology, and mortality. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to Moss, socioeconomic factors that affect impoverished populations such as education, income inequality, and occupation, represent the strongest and most consistent predictors of health and mortality. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1998
  • Denver: National Indian Health Board, 1998. (hhs.gov)
  • Noren J, Kindig D, Sprenger A. "Challenges to Native American Health Care", Public Health Reports 1998, 113:22-33. (hhs.gov)
  • citation needed] By 1998, the President announced new steps for federal oversight including monitoring of poor performance, collection of new fees, and increased focus on nutrition and basic personal care like pressure sores. (wikipedia.org)
  • He was awarded the American Broncho-Esophagological Association- Broyles-Maloney Award-1995, the Honor Award- American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery in 1997, The Maxwell Abramson Memorial Award for Excellence in Teaching and Service- Columbia University- 1997/1998. (wikipedia.org)
  • calculate
  • Our study used TB data from a more recent time period (1996-2005) to calculate and compare rates of TB in U.S.-born and foreign-born populations by population measures of SES. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Pre-conception counseling in the United States is recommended to include: Height and weight to calculate BMI Blood pressure Medical history Abdominal and pelvic examination Rubella screening Varicella screening Domestic violence screening Depression screening Testing for gonorrhea and chlamydia for women at high risk for STDs It is recommended that all pregnant women receive influenza vaccination during flu season. (wikipedia.org)
  • child's
  • According to the American Association for the Child's Right to Play, an estimated 20 percent of all elementary schools in the United States have dropped recess in favor of more classroom time (Tyre, 2004). (ascd.org)
  • tuberculosis
  • In addition, the discovery of antimicrobial therapy has been critical to successful public health efforts to control infections such as tuberculosis and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). (cdc.gov)
  • categorical
  • Prior residential facility classifications were described by Scheerenberger until the modern day classification by David Braddock on a state-by-state basis which includes individuals in residential settings of six or fewer, one categorical group. (wikipedia.org)
  • Intermediate care facilities (small) were developed by the state categorical systems (intellectual disabilities, mental health), back in the 1970s, as a reaction to exposés on institutional conditions resulting in required active treatment in institutions and the new building of community facilities recommended under 16 in size. (wikipedia.org)
  • reform
  • HUPAC is a licensed political action committee that raises money for candidates who support business-driven health care reform. (wikipedia.org)
  • Assisted living came from community living (CL) groups (not from the nursing home industry) who advocated for the separation of facility funding to home and supports in the communities (for information on residential services and reform, see supportive housing and supported living). (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Nursing homes have been the subject of decades of efforts by states and at the national levels to reform health and residential care for "frail" elders, especially those with lower incomes in the US. (wikipedia.org)
  • Along with the Departments of Labor and Treasury, CMS also implements the insurance reform provisions of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) and most aspects of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) of 2010 as amended. (wikipedia.org)
  • families
  • The CCDP was designed to provide intensive, comprehensive, integrated, and continuous support services for children from low-income families from birth, or before, through their entrance into elementary school, to enhance their intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development. (umich.edu)
  • The MIS was designed to monitor the nature and number of services received by families participating in each of the CCDP projects. (umich.edu)
  • National charity, Together For Short Lives wants the best possible care for children and young people who are not expected to live to reach adulthood and their families. (wikipedia.org)
  • They have a clear focus: to enable children and young people with life-limiting and life-threatening conditions to receive full hospice care in their and their families' place of choice, which is overwhelmingly their own home. (wikipedia.org)
  • This general objective was addressed through a prospective, longitudinal study of the experiences of 1,364 children and their families, which took into account the complex interactions among child characteristics and those of the human and physical environments in which the children were reared. (umich.edu)
  • Provide a natural history of infant care in the 1990s, and help establish a baseline of data pertaining to the kinds of care being used by families. (umich.edu)
  • One of the most valuable aspects of the collaborative study is the opportunity it provides to obtain a more complete and accurate picture of patterns of infant care used by families today. (umich.edu)
  • Medicare" was the name originally given to a program providing medical care for families of individuals serving in the military as part of the Dependents' Medical Care Act passed in 1956. (wikipedia.org)
  • utilization
  • MIS data is composed of 23 data collection forms spanning 4 broad categories: (1) CCDP grantee administration, (2) CCDP program descriptions, (3) CCDP family characteristics and service plans, and (4) CCDP services utilization. (umich.edu)
  • children
  • Some states use other names, often attempting to reflect more family-centered (as opposed to child-centered) practices, such as "Department of Children & Family Services" (DCFS). (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1692, states and municipalities identified care for abused and neglected children as the responsibility of local government and private institutions. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1825, states enacted laws giving social-welfare agencies the right to remove neglected children from their parents and from the streets. (wikipedia.org)
  • chYps started life in 1994 as the Children & Young Peoples' Service of EllenorLions Hospices in North West Kent ( Dartford, Gravesend, Swanley). (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1983, of the 1,400 hospices in the United States, only four were able to accept children. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prior to the formation of FAA Tuvalu, there were no services for disabled children in the country. (wikipedia.org)
  • Scholars define "voluntarily childless" women as "women of childbearing age who are fertile and state that they do not intend to have children, women of childbearing age who have chosen sterilization, or women past childbearing age who were fertile but chose not to have children. (wikipedia.org)
  • States that have legalized abortions and easier access to abortions have lower rates of child neglect and better living conditions for children overall. (wikipedia.org)
  • Which can be attributed to the fact that children in those states are more likely to be wanted when they are born. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children who suffer from poor nutrition during the brain's most formative years score much lower on tests of vocabulary, reading comprehension, arithmetic, and general knowledge (Brown & Pollitt, 1996). (ascd.org)
  • According to Loppie and Wien, these health afflictions of poverty most burden outlying groups such as women, children, ethnic minorities, and the disabled. (wikipedia.org)
  • Examining whether individual differences among children moderate the effects of infant care on child development. (umich.edu)
  • Whereas other national databases, such as those provided by the United States Census Bureau, provide static estimates of the number of children in different types of childcare, this network study supplements that knowledge with longitudinal data on successive enrollments into day care at various ages, patterns of arrangements used concurrently and over time, and the stability of arrangements during the first three years of life. (umich.edu)
  • expenditures
  • Smoking during pregnancy can cause poor outcomes for both the pregnant woman and her unborn child ( 1 ) and also result in added health-care expenditures. (cdc.gov)
  • pregnancy
  • Data in MCH SAMMEC are derived by extrapolating the results of a multivariate model estimated on 1995 Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) data for 13 states* to all 50 states. (cdc.gov)
  • and the use of barrier contraceptives to prevent pregnancy and transmission of human immunodeficiency virus and other STDs. (cdc.gov)
  • Physicians will also conduct ultrasounds to monitor the baby's health periodically throughout the pregnancy. (wikipedia.org)
  • time
  • If you have comments concerning the accuracy of the time estimate(s) or suggestions for improving this form, please write to: U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, OS/OCIO/PRA, 200 Independence Ave., S.W., Suite 336-E, Washington D.C. 20201, Attention: PRA Reports Clearance Officer. (hhs.gov)
  • Board and Care homes were the subject of exposés for lacking medical personnel at the time of the 1990s reviews. (wikipedia.org)
  • The study examined the moderating effects of parents' values and attitudes, psychological adjustment and mental health, stress and social support, child-rearing practices, time use, interactions with the child, the marital relationship, and family demographics. (umich.edu)
  • Medicare
  • In the United States, Medicare is a single-payer, national social insurance program administered by the U.S. federal government since 1966, currently[when? (wikipedia.org)
  • not in citation given] United States Medicare is funded by a payroll tax, premiums and surtaxes from beneficiaries, and general revenue. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2015, Medicare provided health insurance for over 55 million-46 million people age 65 and older and 9 million younger people. (wikipedia.org)
  • On average, Medicare covers about half of the health care charges for those enrolled. (wikipedia.org)
  • Out-of-pocket costs can vary depending on the amount of health care a Medicare enrollee needs. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1966, Medicare spurred the racial integration of thousands of waiting rooms, hospital floors, and physician practices by making payments to health care providers conditional on desegregation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medicare added the option of payments to health maintenance organizations in the 1980s. (wikipedia.org)
  • Operations
  • This new organization, Intermountain Healthcare (but then known as Intermountain Health Care [IHC]), assumed the operations of fifteen hospitals in Utah, Southeastern Idaho, and Southwestern Wyoming, including the Garfield Memorial Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • infant
  • NICU admission and infant nights in hospital) were assigned dollar costs based on a 1996 private-sector claims database. (cdc.gov)
  • include
  • In 2014, typologies of residential services in intellectual disabilities include new categories of supported living, personal assistance services, individual and family support, and supported employment. (wikipedia.org)
  • They might include the costs of uncovered services-such as for long-term, dental, hearing, and vision care-and supplemental insurance premiums. (wikipedia.org)
  • Quality
  • They are a charitable organisation, a member of ACT and registered with the Care Quality Commission. (wikipedia.org)
  • Physical training is not associated with worsening of asthma symptoms, and it improves health-related quality of life. (aafp.org)
  • Outcomes included physiologic measurements, exercise capacity, and measures of asthma severity and health-related quality of life. (aafp.org)
  • Four out of five studies demonstrated a positive effect on health-related quality of life. (aafp.org)
  • This is important because health quality, health distribution, and social protection of health in a population affect the development status of a nation. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition to these programs, CMS has other responsibilities, including the administrative simplification standards from the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), quality standards in long-term care facilities (more commonly referred to as nursing homes) through its survey and certification process, clinical laboratory quality standards under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments, and oversight of HealthCare.gov. (wikipedia.org)
  • By 2000, minimum staffing ratios and implementation of Nursing Home Quality of Care were introduced. (wikipedia.org)
  • adults
  • An estimated 97 million adults in the United States are overweight or obese. (ahajournals.org)
  • Before Medicare's creation, approximately 60% of those over 65 had health insurance, with coverage often unavailable or unaffordable to many others, because older adults paid more than three times as much for health insurance as younger people. (wikipedia.org)
  • Methods
  • The methods of manufacture of the vaccine product is now patented in the United States (USPTO) and in the WIPO Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health professionals instruct mothers on prenatal nutrition, the benefits of breastfeeding, life style changes, injury and illness prevention, and methods to monitor potentially dangerous health conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • programs
  • The objective was to bring together in one agency all federal programs in the fields of health, education, and social security. (wikipedia.org)
  • By 1953, the Federal Security Agency's programs in health, education, and social security had grown to such importance that its annual budget exceeded the combined budgets of the Departments of Commerce, Justice, Labor and Interior and affected the lives of millions of people. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Comprehensive Child Development Act also mandated that programs collect data on the individuals and geographic areas served, including the types of services provided, the estimated costs of providing comprehensive services, the types and nature of conditions and needs identified and met, and other information that may be required. (umich.edu)
  • Identifying essential micronutrients and establishing food-fortification programs have almost eliminated major nutritional deficiency diseases such as rickets, goiter, and pellagra in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • Borio served at the United States Department of Health and Human Services as an advisor on biodefense programs (2001 to 2008), where she implemented and managed mathematical modeling projects to assess the health effects of bioterrorism on civilians and to inform medical countermeasures procurement activities for the Office of Preparedness and Response. (wikipedia.org)
  • oversees
  • In addition, the Mayor oversees all city services, public property, police and fire protection, most public agencies, and the District of Columbia Public Schools. (wikipedia.org)
  • million
  • 2 Despite being treatable, asthma was responsible for 10.5 million missed school days and 14.2 million missed work days in 2008, and was responsible for 1.75 million emergency department visits and 456,000 hospitalizations in 2007. (aafp.org)
  • JN-International Medical Corporation in Ivory Coast has provided over 5 million doses of serotypes A & C vaccine on long term credit to the Ministry of Health of Niger, Burkina Faso, Benin and Ivory Coast during meningitis disease outbreak seasons since the year 2006. (wikipedia.org)
  • disability
  • Residents of group homes usually have a disability, such as autism, intellectual disability, chronic or long-term mental/psychiatric disorder, or physical or even multiple disabilities because those are the non-profit and state-regional organizations which began and operated the homes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The choices for topics for this list were based on the opportunity for prevention and the impact on death, illness, and disability in the United States and are not ranked by order of importance. (cdc.gov)
  • [ 1 ] In 1990, 400,000 industrial low back injuries resulting in disability occurred in the United States. (medscape.com)
  • They are: Behavioral Health Consumer and Regulatory Affairs Corrections Disability Services Employment Services Environment Fire and Emergency Medical Services Forensic Sciences General Services Health Care Finance Health Housing and Community Development Human Services Insurance, Securities and Banking Metropolitan Police Motor Vehicles Parks and Recreation Public Works Small and Local Business Development Transportation Youth Rehabilitation Services The Secretary of the District of Columbia is one of the officers of the government. (wikipedia.org)
  • It also provides health insurance to younger people with some disability status as determined by the Social Security Administration, as well as people with end stage renal disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • public health
  • The United States Public Health Service (PHS) is the main division of the HHS and is led by the Assistant Secretary for Health . (wikipedia.org)
  • The United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps , the uniformed service of the PHS, is led by the Surgeon General who is responsible for addressing matters concerning public health as authorized by the Secretary or by the Assistant Secretary of Health in addition to his or her primary mission of administering the Commissioned Corps. (wikipedia.org)
  • The new agency originally consisted of the following major components: (1) Office of the Administrator, (2) Public Health Service (PHS), (3) Office of Education, (4) Civilian Conservation Corps, and (5) Social Security Board. (wikipedia.org)
  • 25 years of this gain are attributable to advances in public health (1). (cdc.gov)
  • Many notable public health achievements have occurred during the 1900s, and other accomplishments could have been selected for the list. (cdc.gov)
  • Like controlled substances, cannabinoids developed for medical use encounter a gauntlet of public health regulatory controls administered by two federal agencies: the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) of the U.S. Department of Justice. (nap.edu)
  • Luciana Borio is an American physician and medical/public health administrator. (wikipedia.org)
  • mothers
  • Among all states, the average SAE for black mothers was almost double that for white mothers ($1,207 versus $651). (cdc.gov)
  • practice
  • In 2009 he left Columbia to join the largest Ear, Nose and Throat practice in the United States, ENT and Allergy Associates LLP, in New York City, NY. (wikipedia.org)
  • birth
  • The study examined the moderating effects of such child characteristics as age, sex, health, birth order, and temperament. (umich.edu)
  • 1970s
  • Prompted in part by problems arising from the Tuskegee Syphilis Study (1932-1972) and based on the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research (1974-1978), the Department of Health, Education and Welfare (HEW) revised and expanded its regulations for the protection of human subjects 45 CFR part 46 in the late 1970s and early 1980s. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • This study is provided by Child Care & Early Education Research Connections . (umich.edu)
  • Tribal Self-Governance Health Care and Social Services Delivery Effectiveness Evaluation Feasibility Study: Draft Literature Review. (hhs.gov)
  • Outlined by Jennifer Sims in her article "A brief review of the Belmont Report", she states 7 things nurses, as primary caregivers for individuals participating in a study, must do to ensure the rights of the participant is met. (wikipedia.org)
  • insurance
  • Neonatal health-care costs, in 1996 dollars, were assigned on the basis of data from private health insurance claims. (cdc.gov)
  • This is the accessible text file for GAO report number GAO-11-268 entitled 'Private Health Insurance: Data on Application and Coverage Denials' which was released on March 16, 2011. (gao.gov)
  • The six states included all states identified by experts and in the literature as collecting data on the rates of application or coverage denials and together represented over 20 percent of private health insurance enrollment nationally. (gao.gov)
  • The National Association of Health Underwriters (NAHU) is a U.S. non-profit professional association organized to promote the common business interests of those engaged in the sale of health insurance services and to advance public knowledge for the need and benefit of health insurance products and services. (wikipedia.org)
  • NAHU is an organization for individuals who are active in the health insurance industry. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its membership represents all segments of the health insurance business but the nucleus of the organization has always been agents. (wikipedia.org)
  • NAHU helps individuals find private health insurance through its "Find an Agent" feature. (wikipedia.org)
  • using about 30-50 private insurance companies across the United States under contract for administration. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research
  • Management Information System Data For research and monitoring purposes, the CCDP mandated that all contacts and services must be recorded and entered into the management information system (MIS). (umich.edu)
  • Public Law 93-247) providing federal funding for wide-ranging federal and state child-maltreatment research and services. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Belmont Report is a report created by the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its full title is the Belmont Report: Ethical Principles and Guidelines for the Protection of Human Subjects of Research, Report of the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Belmont Report was first written by the National Commission for the Protection of Human Services of Biomedical and Behavioral Research. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1978, the Commission's report Ethical Principles and Guidelines for the Protection of Human Subjects of Research was released, and it was published in 1979 in the Federal Register. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Belmont Report is one of the leading works concerning ethics and health care research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Today, the Belmont Report continues as an essential reference for institutional review boards (IRBs) that review HHS-conducted or -supported human subjects research proposals involving human subjects, in order to ensure that the research meets the ethical foundations of the regulations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also in the case someone did not want to participate in research but would like treatment they cannot be turned away and must be treated with the same standard care. (wikipedia.org)
  • L. 93-348) was signed into law, there-by creating the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prior to joining FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research in 2008, Borio was senior associate at the UPMC Center for Health Security and assistant professor of medicine at the University of Pittsburgh (2003-2008). (wikipedia.org)
  • costs
  • and Taming the Beloved Beast: Why Medical Technology Costs are Destroying Our Health Care System (Princeton University Press, August 2009). (wikipedia.org)
  • In the United States, the direct costs of spinal disorders were estimated to be in excess of $23 billion during 1990.This represented an increase of nearly 47% over the estimated costs in 1984. (medscape.com)
  • social
  • CPS is also known by the name of "Department of Social Services" (DSS) or simply "Social Services. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1958, amendments to the Social Security Act mandated that states fund child protection efforts. (wikipedia.org)
  • The social determinants of health in poverty describe the factors that affect impoverished populations' health and health inequality. (wikipedia.org)
  • Inequalities in health stem from the conditions of people's lives, including living conditions, work environment, age, and other social factors, and how these affect people's ability to respond to illness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Daily living conditions work together with these structural drivers to result in the social determinants of health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Social determinants of health - like child development, education, living and working conditions, and healthcare- are of special importance to the impoverished. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, the conditions of individual's daily life are responsible for the social determinants of health and a major part of health inequities between and within countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since health has been considered a fundamental human right, one author suggests the social determinants of health determine the distribution of human dignity. (wikipedia.org)
  • More generally, the WHO considers the circumstances of daily life and structural drivers, which determine health outcome differentials, as the social determinants of health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Different exposures and vulnerabilities to disease and injury determined by social, occupational, and physical environments and conditions, result in more or less vulnerability to poor health. (wikipedia.org)
  • These themes are condensed into a distinct structure of defining the social determinants of health in poverty. (wikipedia.org)
  • The World Health Organization's Social Determinants Council recognized two distinct forms of social determinants for health- social position and socioeconomic and political context. (wikipedia.org)
  • The following divisions are adapted from World Health Organization's Social Determinants Conceptual Framework for explaining and understanding social determinants of health. (wikipedia.org)
  • President Eisenhower held the first White House Conference on Aging in January 1961, in which the creation of a program of health care for social security beneficiaries was proposed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Carolyn W. Colvin (born May 27, 1942 in Arnold, Maryland) was the Acting Commissioner of Social Security Administration in the United States, appointed on February 14, 2013, having succeeded Michael J. Astrue. (wikipedia.org)
  • populations
  • It is important to know how these changes in the epidemiology of TB in the United States have affected the associations of TB and SES in U.S.-born and foreign-born populations. (biomedcentral.com)
  • child care
  • Tribal Child Care. (hhs.gov)
  • Outrage over this case started an organized effort against child maltreatment In 1909, President Theodore Roosevelt convened the White House Conference on Child Dependency, which created a publicly funded volunteer organization to "establish and publicize standards of child care. (wikipedia.org)
  • family
  • Helen House sprang from a friendship between Sister Frances Dominica and the parents of a seriously ill little girl called Helen, who lived at home with her family but required 24-hour care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Not using contraception or family planning services. (wikipedia.org)
  • Within the impoverished population exists a wide range of real income, from less than $2 USD a day, to the United States poverty threshold, which is $22,350 for a family of four. (wikipedia.org)
  • Family relationships, parental mental health, family stress, and so on, are not just inputs to child development or moderators of childcare effects, they are also outcomes. (umich.edu)
  • 1994
  • A, Based on data from multiple rounds of the National Health Interview Survey over time and Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) data from 1994 to 2012. (jamanetwork.com)
  • Since 1994 there is also the opportunity to intercalate a PhD, as part of the integrated MB PhD programme (based on the highly successful MD-PhD programmes which are prevalent in the United States). (wikipedia.org)
  • 2000
  • UNAIDS, Report of the Global HIV/AIDS Epidemic , Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS, 2000. (hindawi.com)
  • The case would also lead to the passage of California laws to reform the garment industry and end sweatshop abuses through independent monitoring and a code of conduct and then eventually to the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (TVPA) passed by the United States Congress (later known as the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act (TVPRA). (wikipedia.org)
  • 1988
  • In 1988, Title II PL 480 expanded to cover development projects as well, and non-emergency funding through monetization had a minimum level of 10%, which increased to 15% with the 1996 Farm Bill. (wikipedia.org)
  • year
  • At least 20 cases of pertussis have been reported to the Seattle-King County Health Department since the start of 1986, compared with just two cases reported during the first five months of last year and only 19 cases for the entire year, said Dr. Jesse Tapp, the health department's communicable disease control officer. (wordpress.com)
  • Each year, complications from pregnancy and childbirth result in about 500,000 maternal deaths, 7 million women have serious long term problems, and 50 million women have health negative outcomes following delivery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Saint Barnabas Medical Center currently treats about 35,000 inpatients and close to 90,000 Emergency Department patients per year. (wikipedia.org)
  • David Ho, a pioneer of this approach, was honored as Time Magazine Man of the Year for 1996. (wikipedia.org)
  • Millions of people are at risk of infection and thousands die every year due to communicable diseases, malnutrition and other health-related events which particularly affect the poor living in rural areas. (wikipedia.org)
  • divides
  • The undergraduate medical program divides into basic medical sciences, clinical sciences and social service, emphasizing basic concepts of sciences and humanities, as well as structure and normal and abnormal function of the human body, always in a biological, psychological and social context. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health Canada divides areas into buffer zones with people's homes, schools or workplaces as the center. (wikipedia.org)
  • democracy
  • See: Office of the First Lady of the United States) These included overseeing her global initiatives on women's rights as human rights, democracy-building micro enterprise, girls' education and other development programs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mexican
  • El Paso stands on the Rio Grande river across the Mexico-United States border from Ciudad Juárez, the most populous city in the Mexican state of Chihuahua. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another reason for the establishment of the school was to provide advanced and specialized training, which before was studied by Mexican students in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • The school has been accredited by the Mexican Association of Colleges and Schools of Medicine, AC (AMFEM) in November 1996, as National Accreditation System Quality Medical Education. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • At present, with the expansion of the school and increased academic programs in the health program was transformed into what is now the School of Medicine and Health Sciences offers the following programs, at the bachelors level, including: physician and surgeon, biomedical engineering, nursing, nutrition and wellness, health systems management, dental surgery and clinical psychology. (wikipedia.org)
  • formerly
  • The Federal Government receives royalties on production on federal lands, managed by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, formerly the Minerals Management Service. (wikipedia.org)
  • contributions
  • The report looks at the direct (operational), indirect (supply chain) and induced (wage spending) contributions of the independent financial services industry. (financialservices.org)
  • With this study we have now quantified those contributions and shown that the impact of independent financial services firms and independent advisors extends well beyond the financial services industry. (financialservices.org)
  • Approximately 70% of health expenditures came from out-of-pocket contributions. (wikipedia.org)
  • report
  • The report measures the national and state economic impact of FSI members and compares those figures with the overall economic impact of the financial services industry at the state level. (financialservices.org)
  • Between 70% and 80% of mothers in the United States report some feelings of sadness or "baby blues" after giving birth. (wikipedia.org)
  • In its 2009 human development report, UN highlighted a growing social problem in Nepal. (wikipedia.org)
  • Treatment
  • Housing First is a relatively recent innovation in human service programs and social policy regarding treatment of the homeless and is an alternative to a system of emergency shelter/transitional housing progressions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Institute
  • The Financial Services Institute (FSI) is the only organization advocating solely on behalf of independent financial advisors and independent financial services firms. (financialservices.org)
  • Dr. Jacques Cohen, an embryologist of the Institute, discovered a technique called the cytoplasmic transfer in 1996 in which the contents of a fertile egg from a donor are injected into the infertile egg of the patient who has undergone unsuccessful attempts of IVF along with the sperm. (wikipedia.org)
  • behalf
  • Taxation in New Zealand is collected at a national level by the Inland Revenue Department (IRD) on behalf of the Government of New Zealand. (wikipedia.org)
  • basic
  • The New Zealand economy has been ranked first in the world for Social Progression, which covers such areas as Basic Human Needs, Foundations of Wellbeing, and the level of Opportunity available to its citizens. (wikipedia.org)
  • Housing First for the chronically homeless is premised on the notion that housing is a basic human right, and so should not be denied to anyone, even if they are abusing alcohol or other substances. (wikipedia.org)
  • The poor and excluded have limited access to basic health care due to its high costs and low availability. (wikipedia.org)
  • Disease
  • What some people call the human form of Mad Cow Disease. (blogspot.com)
  • Then young Britons began dying, and scientists realized humans could catch a prion disease from eating infected beef. (blogspot.com)
  • HIV-2 is common in West Africa, but is much rarer in the United States than HIV-1, which is more virulent and progresses more quickly to the fully fledged AIDS disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • AIDS
  • Detection of the microsporidian parasite Enterocytozoon bieneusi in specimens from patients with AIDS by PCR," Journal of Clinical Microbiology , vol. 34, no. 12, pp. 3230-3232, 1996. (hindawi.com)
  • trafficking of wo
  • Vital Voices focuses on expanding women's participation in politics and civil society, increasing women's entrepreneurship and fighting human rights abuses, particularly the trafficking of women and children. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sector
  • Also headquartered in El Paso are the DEA domestic field division 7, El Paso Intelligence Center, Joint Task Force North, United States Border Patrol El Paso Sector, and the US Border Patrol Special Operations Group (SOG). (wikipedia.org)
  • New Zealand's diverse market economy has a sizable service sector, accounting for 63% of all GDP activity in 2013. (wikipedia.org)
  • ASH opened in 1954, as a state-run, self-contained public sector forensic psychiatric facility. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health care services in Nepal are provided by both the public and private sector and fare poorly by international standards. (wikipedia.org)
  • Compares
  • The biology is with an time of the MD of the service and yet encrypts to qualities of ginseng Compares that can be in both spirit and account people. (keepergoals.com)
  • level
  • In September, the government's control of territory decreased in Faryab and Kandahar provinces, and there was high-level ground engagement in Balkh and Jowzjan provinces without leading to significant and sustained changes in territorial control, according to the United Nations Security Council. (acaps.org)
  • people
  • In early December 2006, President George W. Bush indicated that he would issue an executive order allowing HIV-positive people to enter the United States on standard visas. (wikipedia.org)
  • Housing First is an approach that offers permanent, affordable housing as quickly as possible for individuals and families experiencing homelessness, and then provides the supportive services and connections to the community-based supports people need to keep their housing and avoid returning to homelessness. (wikipedia.org)
  • provider
  • Know the risks and potential benefits of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The city is the headquarters of Western Refining, a Fortune 500 company, and three publicly traded companies, as well as home to the Medical Center of the Americas, the only medical research and care provider complex in west Texas and southern New Mexico, and the University of Texas at El Paso, the city's primary university. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2) The provider is obligated to bring robust support services to the housing. (wikipedia.org)
  • public
  • Public health officials have become worried that if the trend continues, childhood diseases that are now considered minor problems in the United States could return in force. (wordpress.com)
  • problems
  • Have other health problems such that survival is extremely unlikely even if the infant's cholestasis improves. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • This method requires that the students define the fields of knowledge that they have to study and learn to solve health problems.This methodology seeks to develop the following skills: self learning, clinical reasoning, teamwork and self-evaluation. (wikipedia.org)
  • form
  • Prions are proteins found in humans and other mammals, but when an altered form of the prion appears, it somehow starts a critical chain reaction turning healthy prions in to deadly ones that ultimately destroy the brain. (blogspot.com)
  • The two cities, along with Las Cruces in the neighboring U.S. state of New Mexico, form a combined international metropolitan area sometimes referred to as the Paso del Norte or El Paso-Juárez-Las Cruces. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1982, the Board of Trustees voted to form a multi-corporation healthcare system with the Saint Barnabas Corporation as the parent company which was the beginning of Saint Barnabas Health Care System. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1996, the Federal Trade Commission approved Saint Barnabas Health Care System to form a statewide health system. (wikipedia.org)
  • member
  • See: Executive Office of the President of the United States) As a member of the White House Senior Staff, she provided advice and implemented a wide range of substantive policies, including judicial selection and legal services, arts policies, health care and women's issues. (wikipedia.org)
  • country
  • Monetization of U.S. in-kind food aid is the sale of food commodities purchased in and shipped from the United States and sold for local currency in a recipient country by "cooperating sponsors", which are typically U.S.-based non-governmental organizations (NGOs) or recipient governments. (wikipedia.org)
  • According
  • According to a study by Barrett and Lentz, monetization in the United States is driven by the "iron triangle" of producers and processors, the U.S. shipping industry, and NGOs. (wikipedia.org)
  • transportation
  • Cyclops , the only ship of her class, was engaged in the transportation of bulk cargo to and from the United States to Brazil in early 1918. (navyhistory.org)
  • On 9 January 1918, she was assigned to Naval Overseas Transportation Service, departing Norfolk the day before with 9,960 tons of coal for English ships in the South Atlantic. (navyhistory.org)
  • The process of monetizing can be used to promote low-cost, competitive food markets by encouraging investment in transportation, infrastructure and human capital (traders, entrepreneurs). (wikipedia.org)
  • Center
  • It would serve as a wake-up call for the world to the global phenomenon of human trafficking and modern-day slavery and would begin the anti-trafficking movement in the United States with the Thai Community Development Center as its pioneer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Both Saint Barnabas Medical Center and Saint Barnabas Health Care System continued to grow. (wikipedia.org)
  • The department is designed as a regional perinatal center for high risk pregnancies. (wikipedia.org)
  • years
  • The El Paso region has had human settlement for thousands of years, as evidenced by Folsom points from hunter-gatherers found at Hueco Tanks. (wikipedia.org)
  • sent
  • You sent a main experience of care and you have then succeeded the Sexualities of your terminology. (keepergoals.com)
  • This would have a direct impact on the capital ships sent to the United Kingdom to reinforce the Royal Navy's battleships. (navyhistory.org)
  • Children
  • A whooping-cough outbreak in King County is continuing, and health officials are concerned because nearly three-fourths of the 22 cases have been in unimmunized children. (wordpress.com)
  • make
  • Whether you have read the writer or much, if you are your such and medical hands actually means will make human disciplines that concentrate Usage for them. (keepergoals.com)
  • largest
  • This incident, during World War I, is the largest loss of life in the history of the United States Navy of a U.S. built steel hulled warship where there simply is no direct evidence of why it happened, when it happened, or exactly how it happened. (navyhistory.org)
  • Once complete, the transaction will create New Jersey's largest health care system and one of the largest in the nation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Time
  • lights Of MassageHealth BenefitsMassage TipsThai MassageSauna BenefitsMassage RoomThe BenefitsMessage TherapyMigraine PainForwardsMake Time for Massage: Health Benefits of Massage Therapy InfographicSee download feminist: The Healing Power of TouchBenefits Of MassageHealth BenefitsHealth TipsThe BenefitsMassage BusinessHealing PowerHolistic HealingMassage TherapyHealth FitnessForwardsMassage can randomize car by managing final deviation shortcomings and be a receiver airfare off laughter. (lprock.com)
  • The 56-bed Neonatal Intensive Care Unit has eight full-time neonatologists during the day, at least two newborn specialists at night, and more than 100 NICU nurses. (wikipedia.org)
  • School
  • UCL Medical School is the medical school of University College London (UCL) and is located in London, United Kingdom. (wikipedia.org)
  • management
  • These centuries may help when you attempt getting a continued management of the Services or on another Channel. (weitz.org)
  • The model, used by nonprofit agencies throughout America, also provides wraparound case management services to the tenants. (wikipedia.org)
  • legal
  • so was her Rolodex…There is no way to catalog the many projects that Melanne masterminded… She also became a key player on the president's team, advocating for policies affecting women, human rights, legal services and the arts. (wikipedia.org)
  • staff
  • Many clinical staff left ASH in the late 1990s with the advent of the SVPs, which was believed by many clinicians to compromise the hospital's mission of providing excellent care for persons with serious mental illness, as opposed to containment of sexually dangerous offenders. (wikipedia.org)