• pacemakers
  • He has served in several professional capacities at Sinai Hospital and Cardiac Pacemakers Inc. In 1996, he became the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Mower Research Associates. (wikipedia.org)
  • He has also served as Professor of Physiology and Biophysics at Howard University School of Medicine in Washington, D.C. In 1989, Mower became Vice President of Medical Science at Cardiac Pacemakers Inc. in St. Paul, Minnesota. (wikipedia.org)
  • While at Cardiac Pacemakers, he designed and executed studies in medical education. (wikipedia.org)
  • shortness of bre
  • Some individuals may experience chest pain, shortness of breath, or nausea before cardiac arrest. (wikipedia.org)
  • The symptoms and signs of HCM include shortness of breath due to stiffening and decreased blood filling of the ventricles, exertional chest pain (sometimes known as angina) due to reduced blood flow to the coronary arteries, uncomfortable awareness of the heart beat (palpitations), as well as disruption of the electrical system running through the abnormal heart muscle, lightheadedness, weakness, fainting and sudden cardiac death. (wikipedia.org)
  • congenital
  • The univentricular heart encompasses a spectrum of rare and complex congenital cardiac malformations predominantly managed by a staged surgical approach in view of an ultimate Fontan procedure. (ahajournals.org)
  • clinical
  • The prospective papers by Jorgensen 5 were a landmark in the methodology of identifying clinical signs in patients after cardiac arrest and defined several prognostic factors with remarkable precision: the recovery of the pupillary light reflex within 12 minutes was found to be compatible with neurological survival whereas the absence of the pupillary light reflex after 28 minutes indicated that neurological recovery was unlikely. (bmj.com)
  • abnormal
  • The recognition that diversity in cardiac electrophysiology, and indeed in many aspects of cardiac function, can be attributed to variable expression of specific genes or variability in the function of their protein products has the potential to alter the way in which we think about normal and abnormal electrical heart function. (ahajournals.org)
  • The third part of the article reviews the potential for a genetic approach to understanding diversity in cardiac function, focusing in particular on ion channels and gap junction proteins as the central players in normal and abnormal electrophysiology. (ahajournals.org)
  • frequency
  • Considering that the total cardiac cycle has a duration of 1 second (for a base cardiac frequency of 60 beats per minute), the probability of a mechanical trauma within the window of vulnerability is 1 to 3% only. (wikipedia.org)
  • chronic
  • Cases have shown that the most common finding at postmortem examination of sudden cardiac death (SCD) is chronic high-grade stenosis of at least one segment of a major coronary artery, the arteries that supply the heart muscle with its blood supply. (wikipedia.org)
  • action potential
  • Moreover, integration of molecular function into a single cell and of single cells into cellular networks reveals a multitude of interactions that eventually determine the generation and conduction of the cardiac action potential and therefore arrhythmogenesis. (ahajournals.org)
  • Electrical activity in the normal human heart begins when a cardiac action potential arises in the sinoatrial (SA) node, which is located in the right atrium. (wikipedia.org)
  • The product of the KCNQ1 gene is thought to produce an alpha subunit that interacts with other proteins (in particular, the minK beta subunit) to create the IKs ion channel, which is responsible for the delayed potassium rectifier current of the cardiac action potential. (wikipedia.org)
  • describes
  • This book describes all aspects of the management of cardiopulmonary arrest in both adults and children. (oup.com)
  • death
  • In less-developed countries, sudden cardiac death rates parallel the rates of ischemic heart disease as a whole and therefore are lower. (ahajournals.org)
  • Figure 1 ⇓ places the problem into perspective by expressing the incidence of sudden cardiac death in different subgroups at varying risk while indicating the overall number of events per year for each. (ahajournals.org)
  • It becomes obvious that, to significantly reduce the incidence of sudden cardiac death, more specific markers are needed for the general population to identify large numbers in subgroups that account for a bigger percentage of the more than 300 000 who die suddenly. (ahajournals.org)
  • The present risk factors (see below) generally identify the risk of developing the structural heart disease underlying sudden cardiac death rather than the proximate precipitator of the event. (ahajournals.org)
  • Because the risk of sudden cardiac death does not necessarily equate with the risk of developing structural heart disease, these risk factors have limited ability in identifying specific individuals at risk for sudden cardiac death. (ahajournals.org)
  • Nevertheless, their control, with concomitant reduction in death from coronary artery disease, is probably at least in part responsible for the reduction in overall sudden cardiac death. (ahajournals.org)
  • After an initial high attrition rate for the high-risk group in the first 6 to 18 months, the curves then become parallel, illustrating the modulating effects of time on the incidence of sudden cardiac death. (ahajournals.org)
  • An implantable cardiac defibrillator may be placed to reduce the chance of death from recurrence. (wikipedia.org)
  • Certain types of prompt intervention can often reverse a cardiac arrest, but without such intervention the event will almost always lead to death. (wikipedia.org)
  • Near-death experiences are reported by 10-20% of people who survived cardiac arrest. (wikipedia.org)
  • It can lead a person to have dangerous electrolyte imbalances, leading to acquired long QT syndrome and can in turn result in sudden cardiac death. (wikipedia.org)
  • Commotio cordis is a very rare event, but nonetheless is often considered when an athlete presents with sudden cardiac death. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • Commotio cordis (Latin, "agitation of the heart") is an often lethal disruption of heart rhythm that occurs as a result of a blow to the area directly over the heart (the precordial region), at a critical time during the cycle of a heart beat causing cardiac arrest. (wikipedia.org)
  • data
  • Extrapolation of these data over a 12 month period suggests implantation of at least 166 new ICDs (compared with 23 implants in 1996). (bmj.com)
  • cases
  • From 1996 to spring 2007, the USA National Commotio Cordis Registry had 188 cases recorded, with about half occurring during organized sports. (wikipedia.org)
  • Society
  • He is an associate editor of Heart Rhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society and the Cardiac Electrophysiology Society, and serves on the editorial board of several other peer-reviewed medical publications, including Journal of Electrocardiology and Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (wikipedia.org)
  • specific
  • These factors influence the chance of commotio cordis: Direction of impact over the precordium (precise area, angle of impact) Total applied energy (area of impact versus energy, i.e., the kinetic energy of the projectile E k = 1 2 m v 2 {\displaystyle E_{\text{k}}={\tfrac {1}{2}}mv^{2}} ) Impact occurring within a specific 10- to 30-millisecond portion of the cardiac cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • results
  • Without organized electrical activity in the heart muscle, there is no consistent contraction of the ventricles, which results in the heart's inability to generate an adequate cardiac output (forward pumping of blood from heart to rest of the body). (wikipedia.org)
  • left
  • Because the heart is between the lungs, the left lung is smaller than the right lung and has a cardiac notch in its border to accommodate the heart. (wikipedia.org)