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  • Clinical
  • Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) and Cortico-basal syndrome (CBS) may share similar clinical findings and peculiar tests to distinguish between the two disorders could be useful. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord and roots: basic principles and procedures for routine clinical application. (wikipedia.org)
  • From 1992 to 1994, he obtained a research scholarship by the UK Parkinson`s Disease Society and became Clinical Research Fellow and PhD Student at the Institute of Neurology, (Queen Square) in London, where he conducted work on the experimental, clinical and neuropathological aspects of multiple system atrophy (MSA). (wikipedia.org)
  • Sharing the clinical feature of increased muscle tone, spasticity and rigidity are major motor and movement disorders in subjects with lesions of the upper motor neurones. (bmj.com)
  • An in-depth review of MMN research can be found in Näätänen (1992) while other recent reviews also provide information on the generator mechanisms of MMN (Alho 1995), its magnetic counterpart, MMNm (Näätänen, Ilmoniemi & Alho, 1994), and its clinical applicability (Näätänen & Alho, 1995). (wikipedia.org)
  • 1992
  • Nevertheless, abnormalities of iron metabolism (iron deficiency and iron overload) represent the largest metabolic disorders in medicine (see Lauffer, 1992, for review). (springer.com)
  • Baldessarini RJ, Marsh ER, Kula NS (1992) Interactions of fluoxetine with metabolism of dopamine and serotonin in rat brain regions. (springer.com)
  • psychiatric disorders
  • 38,Leksell and colleagues used the gamma knife (Elekta Instruments, Atlanta, GA) to perform thalamotomies to treat chronic pain and psychiatric disorders and focused it on the trigeminal ganglion in attempts to treat trigeminal neuralgia. (c3.hu)
  • Autoimmune encephalitis (or autoimmune encephalopathy) is a diverse group of neuro-psychiatric disorders recognized recently[when? (wikipedia.org)
  • cognitive
  • Neural oscillations are commonly studied from a mathematical framework and belong to the field of "neurodynamics", an area of research in the cognitive sciences that places a strong focus upon the dynamic character of neural activity in describing brain function. (wikipedia.org)
  • A decrease in estrogen levels can lead to osteoporosis, cognitive disorders, and can affect many important genes related to normal physiological function. (wikipedia.org)
  • obsessive-compulsi
  • [ 1 , 2 ] DBS is currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for PD and essential tremor, as well as a humanitarian device exception for dystonia and obsessive-compulsive disorder. (medscape.com)
  • Other disorders frequently associated with disrupted delta-wave activity include: Narcolepsy Depression Anxiety Obsessive-compulsive disorder Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and its three subtypes. (wikipedia.org)
  • rats
  • Compared with the hemi-parkinsonian rats without EA treatment, the 100 Hz EA treatment significantly decreased apomorphine-induced rotation and increased the latency in the Rotarod test. (springer.com)
  • Inhibition of glutamate and acetylcholine release in behavioral improvement induced by electroacupuncture in parkinsonian rats. (springer.com)
  • focal brain
  • Documentation of a lesion or condition associated with parkinsonism and plausibly connected to the patient's symptom (e.g., focal brain lesion or recent neuroleptic exposure). (mussenhealth.us)
  • EEG used to be a first-line method of diagnosis for tumors, stroke and other focal brain disorders, but this use has decreased with the advent of high-resolution anatomical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). (wikipedia.org)
  • abnormalities
  • Other nervous system MAPs may perform similar functions, as suggested by tau knockout mice that did not show abnormalities in brain development - possibly because of compensation in tau deficiency by other MAPs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stroke
  • Brain injuries can also be the result of a stroke as the resulting lack of oxygen can cause damage to the location of the cerebrovascular accident (CVA). (wikipedia.org)
  • mental disorders
  • The present invention relates to a method of treating neurological and mental disorders which are associated with and/or related pathogenetically to deficient serotonin neurotransmission and impaired pineal melatonin functions in humans. (google.com)
  • American Psychiatric Association, Committee of Nomenclature and Statistics (1987) Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 3rd edn, rev. (springer.com)
  • diseases
  • Current research efforts also include directing the fate and age of human pluripotent stem cells, and using pluripotent stem cells as valuable tools for modeling human diseases such as Familial Dysautonomia, Hirschsprung's disease, neurodevelopmental disorders, as well as melanocyte-related diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • tumors
  • W. Grey Walter was the first person to use delta waves from an EEG to locate brain tumors and lesions causing temporal lobe epilepsy. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • I had this treatment many years ago and the worry as to what it has done to my brain is the worst thing I carry. (ect.org)
  • Thus, beta-synuclein may protect the central nervous system from the neurotoxic effects of alpha-synuclein and provide a novel treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • deprivation
  • Estrogen has been proposed to act as a neuroprotectant at several levels, and it is probable that deprivation of estrogen as a result of menopause exposes the aging or diseased brain to several insults. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2000
  • In 2000, Studer moved to New York City where he embarked on his own research program at Memorial-Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) with a focus on exploring stem cells and brain repair. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • Six tau isoforms exist in human brain tissue, and they are distinguished by their number of binding domains. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, PP2A and PP2B are both present in human brain tissue and have the ability to dephosphorylate Ser396. (wikipedia.org)
  • Beta-synuclein is a synuclein protein found primarily in brain tissue and is seen mainly in presynaptic terminals. (wikipedia.org)
  • proteins
  • The tau proteins were identified in 1975 as heat stable proteins essential for microtubule assembly and has since been characterized as an intrinsically disordered protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, in the human brain, the tau proteins constitute a family of six isoforms with the range from 352-441 amino acids. (wikipedia.org)
  • These proteins are abundantly expressed in the brain and putatively inhibit phospholipase D2 selectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • deterioration
  • or the Steele-Richardson-Olszewski syndrome, after the doctors who described it in 1963) is a degenerative disease involving the gradual deterioration and death of specific volumes of the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • neural
  • Principles of experience-dependent neural plasticity: Implications for rehabilitation after brain damage. (asha.org)
  • Oscillatory activity in the brain is widely observed at different levels of organization and is thought to play a key role in processing neural information. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although neural oscillations in human brain activity are mostly investigated using EEG recordings, they are also observed using more invasive recording techniques such as single-unit recordings. (wikipedia.org)
  • The latter analyses the type of neural oscillations (popularly called "brain waves") that can be observed in EEG signals in the frequency domain. (wikipedia.org)
  • protein
  • citation needed] The major tau protein in the human brain is encoded by 11 exons. (wikipedia.org)
  • The actions of the A2A receptor are complicated by the fact that a variety of functional heteromers composed of a mixture of A2A subunits with subunits from other unrelated G-protein coupled receptors have been found in the brain, adding a further degree of complexity to the role of adenosine in modulation of neuronal activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1993
  • Akai T, Yamaguchi M, Mizuta E, Kuno S (1993) Effects of terguride, a partial D2 agonist, on MPTP-lesioned parkinsonian cynomolgus monkeys. (springer.com)
  • The evidence suggesting that it may be mediated by streptococcal antibodies that cross-react with the brain was published in 1993. (wikipedia.org)
  • human
  • Connor JR, Menzies SL, Martin S, Mufson EJ (1990): The cellular distribution of transferrin, ferritin and iron in the human brain. (springer.com)
  • SPECT
  • In Part A serial dynamic SPECT will be acquired after injection of [123I] mZINT in healthy controls to assess regional brain uptake in human subjects. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Following bolus intravenous injection of 5 mCi of 123-I mZINT over 15 seconds, serial dynamic SPECT brain acquisitions will be obtained to evaluate the regional brain uptake and washout of activity. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • One of the most widely used techniques to diagnose PD is a Single Photon Emission Computer Tomography (SPECT) scan to visualise the integrity of the dopaminergic pathways in the brain. (biomedcentral.com)
  • clinical
  • Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord and roots: basic principles and procedures for routine clinical application. (wikipedia.org)
  • An in-depth review of MMN research can be found in Näätänen (1992) while other recent reviews also provide information on the generator mechanisms of MMN (Alho 1995), its magnetic counterpart, MMNm (Näätänen, Ilmoniemi & Alho, 1994), and its clinical applicability (Näätänen & Alho, 1995). (wikipedia.org)
  • blood-brain b
  • MPTP itself is not toxic, and as a lipophilic compound can cross the blood-brain barrier. (wikipedia.org)
  • MIF-1 is unusually resistant to metabolism in the bloodstream, and crosses the blood-brain barrier easily, though it is poorly active orally and is usually injected. (wikipedia.org)
  • Low-intensity ultrasound has been found to have physiological effects such as ability to stimulate bone-growth, and potential to temporarily disrupt the blood-brain barrier for drug delivery. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, scopolamine has greater effects on the central nervous system (CNS) than atropine due to its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier. (wikipedia.org)
  • psychosis
  • The major change that has occurred since 1994 is that antipsychotics are no longer regarded as useful only for sedation or for psychosis but as being also antimanic. (cnsdiseases.com)
  • neural oscillations
  • Although neural oscillations in human brain activity are mostly investigated using EEG recordings, they are also observed using more invasive recording techniques such as single-unit recordings. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neural oscillations are commonly studied from a mathematical framework and belong to the field of "neurodynamics", an area of research in the cognitive sciences that places a strong focus upon the dynamic character of neural activity in describing brain function. (wikipedia.org)
  • The latter analyses the type of neural oscillations (popularly called "brain waves") that can be observed in EEG signals in the frequency domain. (wikipedia.org)
  • dementia
  • Dementia refers to a large class of disorders characterized by the progressive deterioration of thinking ability and memory as the brain becomes damaged. (wikipedia.org)
  • ADHD
  • Other disorders frequently associated with disrupted delta-wave activity include: Narcolepsy Depression Anxiety Obsessive-compulsive disorder Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and its three subtypes. (wikipedia.org)
  • structures
  • Memory disorders are the result of damage to neuroanatomical structures that hinders the storage, retention and recollection of memories. (wikipedia.org)
  • substantia nigra
  • The direction of complex movement is based from the substantia nigra to the putamen and caudate nucleus, which then relay signals to the rest of the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • The effects of a CVA in the left and right hemispheres of the brain include short-term memory impairment, and difficulty acquiring and retaining new information. (wikipedia.org)
  • Current research efforts also include directing the fate and age of human pluripotent stem cells, and using pluripotent stem cells as valuable tools for modeling human diseases such as Familial Dysautonomia, Hirschsprung's disease, neurodevelopmental disorders, as well as melanocyte-related diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • widely
  • Oscillatory activity in the brain is widely observed at different levels of organization and is thought to play a key role in processing neural information. (wikipedia.org)
  • show
  • Anterograde amnesics show difficulty in the learning and retention of information encountered after brain damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research
  • He was neurology and psychiatric registrar at St Thomas's Hospital for two years, as assistant to Dr. William Sargant, then Research Fellow on the Medical Unit doing research into Parkinsonian trauma and neuropharmacology. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2000, Studer moved to New York City where he embarked on his own research program at Memorial-Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) with a focus on exploring stem cells and brain repair. (wikipedia.org)
  • mechanisms
  • The patient did not respond to prednisone, but eventually recovered, leading Brain to suggest that autoimmune mechanisms might be responsible. (wikipedia.org)
  • human brain
  • Six tau isoforms exist in human brain tissue, and they are distinguished by their number of binding domains. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, PP2A and PP2B are both present in human brain tissue and have the ability to dephosphorylate Ser396. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] The major tau protein in the human brain is encoded by 11 exons. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, in the human brain, the tau proteins constitute a family of six isoforms with the range from 352-441 amino acids. (wikipedia.org)
  • waves
  • His observation of fluctuating brain activity led to the conclusion of brain waves. (wikipedia.org)
  • Delta waves, like other brain waves, are recorded with an electroencephalogram (EEG) and are usually associated with the deep stage 3 of NREM sleep, also known as slow-wave sleep (SWS), and aid in characterizing the depth of sleep. (wikipedia.org)
  • Delta waves, like all brain waves, can be detected by electroencephalography (EEG). (wikipedia.org)
  • Slow waves, including delta waves, are associated with seizure-like activity within the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • depression
  • Subjects will receive rTMS for 25 minutes over either the prefrontal cortex (the brain region associated with mood and depression), and/or primary motor cortex (associated with motor control), and/or sham-rTMS. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • effects
  • This complex mix of actions produces a profile of antidepressant, nootropic, and anti-Parkinsonian effects when MIF-1 is administered, and it has been investigated for various medical uses. (wikipedia.org)
  • treat
  • High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an early stage medical technology that is in various stages of development worldwide to treat a range of disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • activity
  • Electroencephalography (EEG) is an electrophysiological monitoring method to record electrical activity of the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1890, Polish physiologist Adolf Beck published an investigation of spontaneous electrical activity of the brain of rabbits and dogs that included rhythmic oscillations altered by light. (wikipedia.org)
  • Beck started experiments on the electrical brain activity of animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the 1950s, William Grey Walter developed an adjunct to EEG called EEG topography, which allowed for the mapping of electrical activity across the surface of the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • healthy
  • If Part A demonstrates robust brain region specific uptake, then Part B - additional studies in healthy subjects to assess biodistribution, and Part C - studies in PD subjects to compare regional uptake to healthy controls, will be completed. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • movement
  • The condition is caused by the death of nerve cells in certain parts of the brain, leading to characteristic problems with movement. (doctors-hospital.net)
  • Charles) David Marsden (1938-1998), FRS was a British neurologist who made a significant contribution to the field of movement disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • together they founded the Movement Disorders Journal and The Movement Disorder Society Marsden published more than 800 peer reviewed papers and over 208 book chapters. (wikipedia.org)