• Clinical
  • Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord and roots: basic principles and procedures for routine clinical application. (wikipedia.org)
  • Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) and Cortico-basal syndrome (CBS) may share similar clinical findings and peculiar tests to distinguish between the two disorders could be useful. (bioportfolio.com)
  • From 1992 to 1994, he obtained a research scholarship by the UK Parkinson`s Disease Society and became Clinical Research Fellow and PhD Student at the Institute of Neurology, (Queen Square) in London, where he conducted work on the experimental, clinical and neuropathological aspects of multiple system atrophy (MSA). (wikipedia.org)
  • This review describes the clinical characteristics of PD with emphasis on those features that differentiate the disease from other parkinsonian disorders. (bmj.com)
  • 12,13 Clinical trials in people with these disorders have demonstrated that selegiline improves cognitive and other CNS functions. (drugs.com)
  • An in-depth review of MMN research can be found in Näätänen (1992) while other recent reviews also provide information on the generator mechanisms of MMN (Alho 1995), its magnetic counterpart, MMNm (Näätänen, Ilmoniemi & Alho, 1994), and its clinical applicability (Näätänen & Alho, 1995). (wikipedia.org)
  • 1992
  • Nevertheless, abnormalities of iron metabolism (iron deficiency and iron overload) represent the largest metabolic disorders in medicine (see Lauffer, 1992, for review). (springer.com)
  • Baldessarini RJ, Marsh ER, Kula NS (1992) Interactions of fluoxetine with metabolism of dopamine and serotonin in rat brain regions. (springer.com)
  • obsessive-compulsi
  • [ 1 , 2 ] DBS is currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for PD and essential tremor, as well as a humanitarian device exception for dystonia and obsessive-compulsive disorder. (medscape.com)
  • Excessive sequential stereotypy of behavioral patterns (sequential super-stereotypy) in Tourette's syndrome and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is thought to involve dysfunction in nigrostriatal dopamine systems. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Other disorders frequently associated with disrupted delta-wave activity include: Narcolepsy Depression Anxiety Obsessive-compulsive disorder Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and its three subtypes. (wikipedia.org)
  • psychiatric disorders
  • 38,Leksell and colleagues used the gamma knife (Elekta Instruments, Atlanta, GA) to perform thalamotomies to treat chronic pain and psychiatric disorders and focused it on the trigeminal ganglion in attempts to treat trigeminal neuralgia. (c3.hu)
  • Autoimmune encephalitis (or autoimmune encephalopathy) is a diverse group of neuro-psychiatric disorders recognized recently[when? (wikipedia.org)
  • diseases
  • Current research efforts also include directing the fate and age of human pluripotent stem cells, and using pluripotent stem cells as valuable tools for modeling human diseases such as Familial Dysautonomia, Hirschsprung's disease, neurodevelopmental disorders, as well as melanocyte-related diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • dopaminergic
  • 6 7 More recently, genetic mutations, abnormal handling of misfolded proteins by the ubiquitin-proteasome and the autophagy-lysosomal systems, increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation and other pathogenic mechanisms have been identified as contributing factors in the death of dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic cells in the brains of patients with PD. (bmj.com)
  • syndrome
  • or the Steele-Richardson-Olszewski syndrome, after the doctors who described it in 1963) is a degenerative disease involving the gradual deterioration and death of specific volumes of the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • abnormalities
  • Other nervous system MAPs may perform similar functions, as suggested by tau knockout mice that did not show abnormalities in brain development - possibly because of compensation in tau deficiency by other MAPs. (wikipedia.org)
  • focal brain
  • EEG used to be a first-line method of diagnosis for tumors, stroke and other focal brain disorders, but this use has decreased with the advent of high-resolution anatomical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). (wikipedia.org)
  • patient
  • The patient did not respond to prednisone, but eventually recovered, leading Brain to suggest that autoimmune mechanisms might be responsible. (wikipedia.org)
  • mental disorders
  • The present invention relates to a method of treating neurological and mental disorders which are associated with and/or related pathogenetically to deficient serotonin neurotransmission and impaired pineal melatonin functions in humans. (google.com)
  • American Psychiatric Association, Committee of Nomenclature and Statistics (1987) Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 3rd edn, rev. (springer.com)
  • tumors
  • W. Grey Walter was the first person to use delta waves from an EEG to locate brain tumors and lesions causing temporal lobe epilepsy. (wikipedia.org)
  • deprivation
  • Estrogen has been proposed to act as a neuroprotectant at several levels, and it is probable that deprivation of estrogen as a result of menopause exposes the aging or diseased brain to several insults. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2000
  • In 2000, Studer moved to New York City where he embarked on his own research program at Memorial-Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) with a focus on exploring stem cells and brain repair. (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • The effects of a CVA in the left and right hemispheres of the brain include short-term memory impairment, and difficulty acquiring and retaining new information. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • Six tau isoforms exist in human brain tissue, and they are distinguished by their number of binding domains. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, PP2A and PP2B are both present in human brain tissue and have the ability to dephosphorylate Ser396. (wikipedia.org)
  • Beta-synuclein is a synuclein protein found primarily in brain tissue and is seen mainly in presynaptic terminals. (wikipedia.org)
  • proteins
  • The tau proteins were identified in 1975 as heat stable proteins essential for microtubule assembly and has since been characterized as an intrinsically disordered protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, in the human brain, the tau proteins constitute a family of six isoforms with the range from 352-441 amino acids. (wikipedia.org)
  • These proteins are abundantly expressed in the brain and putatively inhibit phospholipase D2 selectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • patterns
  • New mutant mouse models allow gene-based manipulation of brain function relevant to sequential patterns, but no current animal model of spontaneous OCD-like behaviors has so far been reported to exhibit sequential super-stereotypy in the sense of a whole complex serial pattern that becomes stronger and excessively rigid. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Spiking patterns are considered fundamental for information coding in the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • stroke
  • Brain injuries can also be the result of a stroke as the resulting lack of oxygen can cause damage to the location of the cerebrovascular accident (CVA). (wikipedia.org)
  • neural
  • Principles of experience-dependent neural plasticity: Implications for rehabilitation after brain damage. (asha.org)
  • Oscillatory activity in the brain is widely observed at different levels of organization and is thought to play a key role in processing neural information. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although neural oscillations in human brain activity are mostly investigated using EEG recordings, they are also observed using more invasive recording techniques such as single-unit recordings. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neural oscillations are commonly studied from a mathematical framework and belong to the field of "neurodynamics", an area of research in the cognitive sciences that places a strong focus upon the dynamic character of neural activity in describing brain function. (wikipedia.org)
  • The latter analyses the type of neural oscillations (popularly called "brain waves") that can be observed in EEG signals in the frequency domain. (wikipedia.org)
  • human
  • Connor JR, Menzies SL, Martin S, Mufson EJ (1990): The cellular distribution of transferrin, ferritin and iron in the human brain. (springer.com)
  • citation needed] The major tau protein in the human brain is encoded by 11 exons. (wikipedia.org)
  • protein
  • The actions of the A2A receptor are complicated by the fact that a variety of functional heteromers composed of a mixture of A2A subunits with subunits from other unrelated G-protein coupled receptors have been found in the brain, adding a further degree of complexity to the role of adenosine in modulation of neuronal activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1993
  • Akai T, Yamaguchi M, Mizuta E, Kuno S (1993) Effects of terguride, a partial D2 agonist, on MPTP-lesioned parkinsonian cynomolgus monkeys. (springer.com)
  • The evidence suggesting that it may be mediated by streptococcal antibodies that cross-react with the brain was published in 1993. (wikipedia.org)