• Parkinson's
  • Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the marked degeneration of substantia nigral dopamine neurons. (jkns.or.kr)
  • The pineal gland serves as a magnetoreceptor organ in the brain of humans and other mammals and its stimulation with an AC pulsed magnetic field has shown beneficial effects in the treatment of neurological and mental disorders which are associated with or related pathogenetically to impairment of pineal melatonin functions including multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, juvenile Parkinsonism, progressive supranuclear palsy. (google.com)
  • He established the UK Parkinson's Disease Society´s brain bank. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gregor Karl Wenning (born 21 March 1964 in Horstmar, Westfalia) is a German Neurologist best known for his clinical and scientific work in Parkinson's disease and atypical Parkinsonian disorders, particularly multiple system atrophy (MSA). (wikipedia.org)
  • Scholarship - German National Scholarship Foundation, 1983-1990 Scholarship - UK Parkinon's Disease Society, 1992-1994 Science Prize - Austrian Parkinson's Disease Society, 1998 (First recipient) MSA Research Prize - Oppenheimer Prize, 2004 (First recipient) MSA Research Prize - JiePie Schouppe Award, 2014 (First recipient) Wenning et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • Parkinson's disease (PD) has been classically considered a predominantly environmentally related disorder with known etiologies, including MPTP toxin exposure, carbon monoxide exposure, postencephalitic related (1919 epidemic), manganese exposure, and other putative chemical exposures involving injury to mitochondrial complex I enzymes. (mussenhealth.us)
  • Asymmetric findings Levodopa response dyskinesia Lewy bodies The clinical heterogeneity of Parkinson's disease makes it difficult to differentiate it from other parkinsonian disorders based on the clinical criteria alone. (mussenhealth.us)
  • Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurological disorder characterised by a large number of motor and non-motor features that can impact on function to a variable degree. (bmj.com)
  • Some neurodegenerative diseases, especially Parkinson's disease, may represent abnormally rapid brain aging. (drugs.com)
  • The 10th Global College of Neuroproetction and Neuroregeneration Annual Conference together with the International Association of Neurorestoratology VI was held to discuss on neurorestoration, neuroprotection and neuroregeneration in various clinical neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's disease, stroke and brain or spinal cord injuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • One clinical study of patients with tardive dyskinesia associated with Parkinson's disease found that tiapride significantly improved motor abilities without affecting other parkinsonian symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • The A2A receptor is also expressed in the brain, where it has important roles in the regulation of glutamate and dopamine release, making it a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of conditions such as insomnia, pain, depression, drug addiction and Parkinson's disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • In long-term studies, Studer demonstrated that these cells are non-tumorigenic, can integrate into the host brain and may serve as functional replacements for the substantia nigra dopamine neurons which die in Parkinson's disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • The following year, he joined Ronald McKay's lab at the National Institute of Health (NIH) to investigate how neural cells could be isolated, cultured, and differentiated to produce neurons with the aim of restoring brain function in Parkinson's disease mouse models. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sleep disturbances, as well as dementia, are common features of Parkinson's disease, and patients with this disease show disrupted brain wave activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clinical
  • Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord and roots: basic principles and procedures for routine clinical application. (wikipedia.org)
  • From 1992 to 1994, he obtained a research scholarship by the UK Parkinson`s Disease Society and became Clinical Research Fellow and PhD Student at the Institute of Neurology, (Queen Square) in London, where he conducted work on the experimental, clinical and neuropathological aspects of multiple system atrophy (MSA). (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition to caring for patients with Parkinsonian syndromes and dementia, his clinical activities also include the work up and treatment of autonomic disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • This review describes the clinical characteristics of PD with emphasis on those features that differentiate the disease from other parkinsonian disorders. (bmj.com)
  • Clinical Neurology of Aging, Third Edition continues the tradition of the First (1984) and Second (1994) editions with 60 chapters written by the world's elite clinicians from neurology, geriatrics and research on all aspects of geriatric neurology. (oup.com)
  • His areas of interest pertain to clinical management of young people who stutter and fluency disorders secondary to neurological conditions such as Tourette Syndrome and ADHD. (mnsu.edu)
  • In my own clinical practice, I've seen the Brain Caps work wonders in helping people improve their memory and keep their mind sharp. (drdharma.com)
  • 12,13 Clinical trials in people with these disorders have demonstrated that selegiline improves cognitive and other CNS functions. (drugs.com)
  • An in-depth review of MMN research can be found in Näätänen (1992) while other recent reviews also provide information on the generator mechanisms of MMN (Alho 1995), its magnetic counterpart, MMNm (Näätänen, Ilmoniemi & Alho, 1994), and its clinical applicability (Näätänen & Alho, 1995). (wikipedia.org)
  • He successfully demonstrated that upon transplantation, these newly developed dopaminergic neurons can improve clinical symptoms in Parkinsonian rat models. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alzheimer's
  • However, microscopic examination of the brains of people who have died of Alzheimer's shows loss of cells in the thinking part of the brain, particularly cells that release a chemical called acetylcholine. (medicalcityhospital.com)
  • All of the six tau isoforms are present in an often hyperphosphorylated state in paired helical filaments from Alzheimer's disease brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Memory disorders can be progressive, including Alzheimer's disease, or they can be immediate including disorders resulting from head injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive, degenerative and fatal brain disease, in which cell to cell connections in the brain are lost. (wikipedia.org)
  • PET scan of a healthy brain - Image courtesy of US National Institute on Aging Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center PET scan of brain with AD - Image courtesy of US National Institute on Aging Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Amnesia is an abnormal mental state in which memory and learning are affected out of all proportion to other cognitive functions in an otherwise alert and responsive patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • levodopa
  • Since peripheral decarboxylation is inhibited, this allows more levodopa to be available for transport to the brain, where it will be converted to dopa-mine, thus relieving the symptoms of parkinsonism. (mussenhealth.us)
  • dopaminergic
  • 6 7 More recently, genetic mutations, abnormal handling of misfolded proteins by the ubiquitin-proteasome and the autophagy-lysosomal systems, increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation and other pathogenic mechanisms have been identified as contributing factors in the death of dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic cells in the brains of patients with PD. (bmj.com)
  • obsessive-compulsi
  • Excessive sequential stereotypy of behavioral patterns (sequential super-stereotypy) in Tourette's syndrome and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is thought to involve dysfunction in nigrostriatal dopamine systems. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Other disorders frequently associated with disrupted delta-wave activity include: Narcolepsy Depression Anxiety Obsessive-compulsive disorder Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and its three subtypes. (wikipedia.org)
  • gait
  • Patients were evaluated pre- and postoperatively by a team of observers skilled in the assessment of gait and movement disorders who were blinded to the procedure performed. (c3.hu)
  • focal brain
  • Documentation of a lesion or condition associated with parkinsonism and plausibly connected to the patient's symptom (e.g., focal brain lesion or recent neuroleptic exposure). (mussenhealth.us)
  • EEG used to be a first-line method of diagnosis for tumors, stroke and other focal brain disorders, but this use has decreased with the advent of high-resolution anatomical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). (wikipedia.org)
  • 2000
  • Due to overlapping symptoms, it is often difficult to separate stuttering from other neurological, psychological, or motor speech disorders (Van Borsel & Vanryckeghem, 2000). (mnsu.edu)
  • In 2000, Studer moved to New York City where he embarked on his own research program at Memorial-Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) with a focus on exploring stem cells and brain repair. (wikipedia.org)
  • neuronal
  • The actions of the A2A receptor are complicated by the fact that a variety of functional heteromers composed of a mixture of A2A subunits with subunits from other unrelated G-protein coupled receptors have been found in the brain, adding a further degree of complexity to the role of adenosine in modulation of neuronal activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • syndrome
  • or the Steele-Richardson-Olszewski syndrome, after the doctors who described it in 1963) is a degenerative disease involving the gradual deterioration and death of specific volumes of the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of these fluency disorders that has gained attention in the past few years is associated with Tourette's Syndrome. (mnsu.edu)
  • Tourette's Syndrome is a motor disorder characterized by the presence of motor or vocal tics. (mnsu.edu)
  • The purpose of this paper is to present two different case studies that have been diagnosed with fluency disorders associated with Tourette's Syndrome. (mnsu.edu)
  • John was diagnosed with Tourette's Syndrome and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) at six years of age by his neurologist. (mnsu.edu)
  • Aluminum is widely used as an adjuvant in various vaccine formulations and has been implicated in a multisystem disorder termed ?autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants? (omicsonline.org)
  • tumors
  • W. Grey Walter was the first person to use delta waves from an EEG to locate brain tumors and lesions causing temporal lobe epilepsy. (wikipedia.org)
  • impairment
  • The effects of a CVA in the left and right hemispheres of the brain include short-term memory impairment, and difficulty acquiring and retaining new information. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • Occurrence of communication and swallowing problems in neurological disorders: Analysis of forty patients. (asha.org)
  • Elucidation of the basis for sequential super-stereotypy of instinctive behavior in DAT knockdown mutant mice may offer insights into neural mechanisms of overly-rigid sequences of action or thought in human patients with disorders such as Tourette's or OCD. (biomedcentral.com)
  • If you answered "yes" to any of these questions, you'll be interested in the following benefits of the Brain Caps, a phenomenal supplement that I personally formulated for my own private patients. (drdharma.com)
  • abnormalities
  • Other nervous system MAPs may perform similar functions, as suggested by tau knockout mice that did not show abnormalities in brain development - possibly because of compensation in tau deficiency by other MAPs. (wikipedia.org)
  • autoimmune
  • The patient did not respond to prednisone, but eventually recovered, leading Brain to suggest that autoimmune mechanisms might be responsible. (wikipedia.org)
  • abilities
  • If you feel your cognitive abilities slipping with age or excess stress, or if you just want to boost your brain power and mental fitness, then it's critically important that you start now to protect your memory before it's too late. (drdharma.com)
  • people
  • I've helped literally thousands of people from the four corners of the earth fix their broken brains. (drdharma.com)
  • Recent research reveals that people with the highest levels of DHA in their brain have the best functioning mind and memory. (drdharma.com)
  • such as cognitive decline, compared to people not suffering from the disorder ( Lu and Hu, 2012 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • include
  • These include cluttering, psychogenic stuttering, neurogenic stuttering and other disorders that appear on the surface to be stuttering, but are different in their symptoms, course of development, and treatment (ASHA, 1999). (mnsu.edu)
  • Current research efforts also include directing the fate and age of human pluripotent stem cells, and using pluripotent stem cells as valuable tools for modeling human diseases such as Familial Dysautonomia, Hirschsprung's disease, neurodevelopmental disorders, as well as melanocyte-related diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • patterns
  • New mutant mouse models allow gene-based manipulation of brain function relevant to sequential patterns, but no current animal model of spontaneous OCD-like behaviors has so far been reported to exhibit sequential super-stereotypy in the sense of a whole complex serial pattern that becomes stronger and excessively rigid. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Spiking patterns are considered fundamental for information coding in the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • typically
  • Onset is typically before the age of 18 (DSM-IV, American Psychiatric Association, 1994). (mnsu.edu)
  • stroke
  • Brain injuries can also be the result of a stroke as the resulting lack of oxygen can cause damage to the location of the cerebrovascular accident (CVA). (wikipedia.org)
  • neural
  • Principles of experience-dependent neural plasticity: Implications for rehabilitation after brain damage. (asha.org)
  • Oscillatory activity in the brain is widely observed at different levels of organization and is thought to play a key role in processing neural information. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although neural oscillations in human brain activity are mostly investigated using EEG recordings, they are also observed using more invasive recording techniques such as single-unit recordings. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neural oscillations are commonly studied from a mathematical framework and belong to the field of "neurodynamics", an area of research in the cognitive sciences that places a strong focus upon the dynamic character of neural activity in describing brain function. (wikipedia.org)
  • The latter analyses the type of neural oscillations (popularly called "brain waves") that can be observed in EEG signals in the frequency domain. (wikipedia.org)
  • human brain
  • Six tau isoforms exist in human brain tissue, and they are distinguished by their number of binding domains. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, PP2A and PP2B are both present in human brain tissue and have the ability to dephosphorylate Ser396. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] The major tau protein in the human brain is encoded by 11 exons. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, in the human brain, the tau proteins constitute a family of six isoforms with the range from 352-441 amino acids. (wikipedia.org)
  • cells
  • VMAT2 favors expression in a variety of monoaminergic cells of the CNS such as the brain, sympathetic nervous system, mast cells, and cells containing histamine in the gut. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • Beta-synuclein is a synuclein protein found primarily in brain tissue and is seen mainly in presynaptic terminals. (wikipedia.org)
  • proteins
  • The tau proteins were identified in 1975 as heat stable proteins essential for microtubule assembly and has since been characterized as an intrinsically disordered protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • These proteins are abundantly expressed in the brain and putatively inhibit phospholipase D2 selectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • years
  • As you probably know, I've been working in the field of Brain Longevity ® for over 20 years. (drdharma.com)
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