• Shaken Baby Syn
  • In the 1940s and 1950s, due to improved technology in diagnostic radiology, the medical profession began to take notice of what they believed to be intentional injuries, the so-called "Shaken Baby Syndrome. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1995
  • Since 1995 the members have met semiannually at the conferences of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children to discuss their views of MSBP with the ultimate goal of providing scholarly guidance to practitioners in the field of child protection. (eofamilylaw.com)
  • 1996
  • Research in 1996 in England found no case in which a battered woman successfully pleaded self-defense (see Noonan at p198). (wikipedia.org)
  • Similarly, in R v Thornton (No 2) (1996) 2 AER 1023 the battered wife adduced fresh evidence that she had a personality disorder and the Court of Appeal ordered a retrial considering that, if the evidence had been available at the original trial, the jury might have reached a different decision. (wikipedia.org)
  • American Correctional Association Victims Committee (1996), Reports and Recommendations on Restorative Justice (Draft), Lanham, MD: Unpublished manuscript. (ovc.gov)
  • Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act
  • U.S. federal laws that govern CPS agencies include: Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) Multi-Ethnic Placement Act (MEPA) Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA) Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504) Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) 42 U.S.C. Section 1983, and depending on the circumstances 1985. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1974 the U.S. Congress passed the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, which encouraged remaining states to pass child protection laws and created the National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • wives
  • Even the most callous listener could not help but express moral indignation at ex-wives who used children as pawns to gain an edge in a property settlement, greedy lawyers who milked until they were broke then dropped them like hot potatoes, and mental health professionals who would slant their testimony to trick the courts into depriving fathers of the right to see their children. (blogspot.com)
  • Alcoholics may have young, teenage, or grown-up children, they have wives or husbands, they have brothers or sisters, they have parents or other relatives. (alcohol-ism.info)
  • Hungarian immigrant convicted of the murder and rape of his two wives and four children. (wikipedia.org)
  • historically
  • If the terms "Munchausen syndrome by proxy" or "factitious disorder by proxy" are used in prosecuting the abuse, expert testimony is required and often results in a battle of the psychiatric and/or pediatric experts over definition issues that have been historically argued in the literature. (eofamilylaw.com)
  • child's
  • Child abuse may include any act or failure to act by a parent or other caregiver that results in actual or potential harm to a child, and can occur in a child's home, or in the organizations, schools or communities the child interacts with. (wikipedia.org)
  • The WHO defines physical abuse as: Intentional use of physical force against the child that results in - or has a high likelihood of resulting in - harm for the child's health, survival, development or dignity. (wikipedia.org)
  • all of which specifically target anger patterns and distorted beliefs, and offer training and/or reflection, support, and modelling that focuses on parenting skills and expectations, as well as increasing empathy for the child by supporting the parent's taking the child's perspective. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most U.S. states, however, permit parents to use religious beliefs as a defense against prosecution for the withholding of medical treatment from their sick children, even in cases where the lack of treatment results in a child's death. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • term
  • Instead of using the term "battered woman", the terminology "battering and its effects" became acceptable. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, "Munchausen syndrome by proxy" is the original term used in 1977 by Roy Meadow, a British pediatrician, which was based on "Munchausen syndrome," coined in 1951 to describe adults who made themselves ill. (eofamilylaw.com)
  • Medical battering" has been suggested by pediatrics, to resemble the term "battered child syndrome. (eofamilylaw.com)
  • The task force has separated the victimization of the child from the motivation of the perpetrator, resulting in a recommendation that the term "pediatric condition falsification" be used to describe this type of abuse, regardless of the perpetrator's motivation. (eofamilylaw.com)
  • effects
  • In 1997, they published the report of their investigation, titled The Validity and Use of Evidence Concerning Battering and Its Effects in Criminal Trials. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tilden, 1989) mention head trauma as a serious outcome of physical abuse by a male partner, the scope and residual effects of this particular type of battering have yet to be studied. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Parental alcoholism also has severe effects on normal children of alcoholics. (alcohol-ism.info)
  • researchers
  • Definitions of child maltreatment can vary across the sectors of society which deal with the issue, such as child protection agencies, legal and medical communities, public health officials, researchers, practitioners, and child advocates. (wikipedia.org)
  • But the reported cases are believed to represent only a fraction of victims, researchers say. (orlandosentinel.com)
  • Originally researchers failed to separate domestic disputes from other types of "disturbance" calls and raw percentages stretched the findings beyond what they reasonably meant (Fridell and Pate, 1997). (popcenter.org)
  • Adolescents
  • Treating Trauma and Traumatic Grief in Children and Adolescents. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prof. Frank Ascione at the University of Denver and Prof. Arnold Arluke at Northeastern University estimate that one in four children and adolescents with conduct disorder have abused animals. (psychologytoday.com)
  • Severe
  • However, when a child of any age shows intentional cruelty toward animals that is repeated, severe and without remorse, this should be taken very seriously. (psychologytoday.com)
  • intervention
  • This principal of parens patriae has been identified as the statutory basis for U.S. governmental intervention in families' child rearing practices. (wikipedia.org)
  • A child who abuses animals requires immediate intervention and treatment. (psychologytoday.com)
  • adults
  • The scenario is by now sickeningly familiar: a troubled teenage boy unleashes mayhem in an instant, taking down children, adults, and ultimately himself in a hail of bullets. (psychologytoday.com)
  • When we keep animals safe from harm, we also help keep children and adults safe. (psychologytoday.com)
  • person
  • Although the victim may disclose the abuse, the trauma bond means that the victim may wish to receive comfort from the very person who abused them. (wikipedia.org)
  • It may involve relationships between spouses, adult children, other relatives, maybe friends, and anyone else in whom the older person has placed trust. (nih.gov)
  • advocate
  • In the late-19th century, private child protection agencies - modeled after existing animal protection organizations - developed to investigate reports of child maltreatment, present cases in court and advocate for child welfare legislation. (wikipedia.org)
  • We should examine the role of a victim impact statement and victim advocate for those who are traumatized emotionally as well as from a criminal act. (narcissisticabuse.com)
  • suicidal
  • Although it has been many years since my divorce from Eric Bleicken, the pain of the intense lies that were told (that I wasn't feeding my children, that I was suicidal, that I was a negligent mother, etc.), and the 200 plus harassment motions that Eric Bleicken filed over a five year period were still under the surface. (blogspot.com)
  • medical treatment
  • For example, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled (1944) that parents do not have an absolute right to deny life-saving medical treatment to their children, but devout members of the Church of Christ, Scientist, and other churches believe in the healing power of prayer and do not always seek medical help. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • result
  • this is because the harm may have been unintentional, or because the caregivers did not understand the severity of the problem, which may have been the result of cultural beliefs about how to raise a child. (wikipedia.org)
  • report
  • On his first grade report card, one teacher described Dahmer as a reserved child whom she sensed felt neglected. (wikipedia.org)
  • parents
  • Child maltreatment includes both acts of commission and acts of omission on the part of parents or caregivers that cause actual or threatened harm to a child. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1825, states enacted laws giving social-welfare agencies the right to remove neglected children from their parents and from the streets. (wikipedia.org)
  • These include parents who exaggerate or falsify illness in their children for the purpose of getting financial payments, and parents who batter their children and then lie about it when seeking treatment. (eofamilylaw.com)
  • issues
  • Stress builds from the pressures of daily life, like conflict over children, marital issues, misunderstandings, or other family conflicts. (wikipedia.org)
  • intervene
  • But as the suffering continued and observers remained unable to intervene, the observers began to derogate the victim. (wikipedia.org)