• 2000
  • See Mendocino County GMO Ban) The Biotechnology Regulatory Services program of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) agency within the USDA is concerned with protecting agriculture and the environment from potential pests under the Plant Protection Act of 2000 (part of the Agriculture Risk Protection Act) and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). (wikipedia.org)
  • Environmental Protec
  • The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency classifies dioxane as a probable human carcinogen (having observed an increased incidence of cancer in controlled animal studies, but not in epidemiological studies of workers using the compound), and a known irritant (with a no-observed-adverse-effects level of 400 milligrams per cubic meter) at concentrations significantly higher than those found in commercial products. (wikipedia.org)
  • levels for many of these contaminants are in violation of United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Cal/EPA standards by several hundredfold. (wikipedia.org)
  • addiction
  • CSAT supports a variety of activities aimed at fulfilling its mission: To improve the lives of individuals and families affected by alcohol and drug abuse by ensuring access to clinically sound, cost-effective addiction treatment that reduces the health and social costs to our communities and the nation. (wikipedia.org)
  • organizations
  • The evidence base regarding the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of specific components of prevention and early detection is reviewed regularly by many health organizations, including the American Cancer Society (ACS), the American Diabetes Association (ADA), and the American Heart Association (AHA). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • The evidence base with regard to the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of specific components of prevention and early detection is reviewed regularly by many health organizations, including the American Cancer Society (ACS), the American Diabetes Association (ADA), and the American Heart Association (AHA). (ahajournals.org)
  • In the late-19th century, private child protection agencies - modeled after existing animal protection organizations - developed to investigate reports of child maltreatment, present cases in court and advocate for child welfare legislation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 501(c)(3) Skyshapers Foundation (dba Skyshapers University) is a public charity established in August 1988, which provides scholarships, materials and services to children, parents, schools and other non-profit organizations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Public health is "the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting human health through organized efforts and informed choices of society, organizations, public and private, communities and individuals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Public health plays an important role in disease prevention efforts in both the developing world and in developed countries, through local health systems and non-governmental organizations. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Toxicology and Environmental Health Program was established at the National Library of Medicine in 1967 and is charged with developing computer databases compiled from the medical literature and from the files of governmental and nongovernmental organizations. (wikipedia.org)
  • They demonstrate that major public policy in important domains such as health and energy are shaped by latent social connections that exist among the leaders of numerous networked organizations (e.g., lay voluntary association, federal agencies, and professional societies). (wikipedia.org)
  • Defense
  • The Bonus Bill (An act to set apart and pledge certain funds for internal improvements, and which sets apart and pledges funds for constructing roads and canals, and improving the navigation of water courses to facilitate, promote, and give security to internal commerce among the several States, and to render more easy and less expensive the means and provisions for the common defense), vetoed March 3, 1817. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1956, the library collection was transferred from the control of the U.S. Department of Defense to the Public Health Service of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare and renamed the National Library of Medicine, through the instrumentality of Frank Bradway Rogers, who was the director from 1956 to 1963. (wikipedia.org)
  • public
  • The Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) was a public health surveillance system in the United States that monitored drug-related visits to hospital emergency departments and drug-related deaths. (wikipedia.org)
  • Public Health Service, Department of Health and Human Services under President Reagan which included the NIH, FDA, ADAMHA , CDC and HRSA, with a budget of over $10 billion and 40,000 employees. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • CMHS was established under the 1992 ADAMHA Reorganization Act, Public Law 102-321, which mandates CMHS' leadership role in delivering mental health services, generating and applying new knowledge, and establishing national mental health policy. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The article focuses on the Food Safety Modernization Act established by the Food and Drug Administration, which is aimed at modernizing the food safety system for better protection of public health in the U.S. (ebscohost.com)
  • Deals with the implications of the passing of the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Response Act of 2001, a legislation which expands the authority of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to respond to bioterrorism, for the converting industry. (ebscohost.com)
  • A concerted effort to increase application of public health and clinical interventions of known efficacy to reduce prevalence of tobacco use, poor diet, and insufficient physical activity-the major risk factors for these diseases-and to increase utilization of screening tests for their early detection could substantially reduce the human and economic cost of these diseases. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • He returned to the John F. Kennedy School of Government in 1992, becoming an associate of the Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Dr. Nathan Davis Awards are presented annually by the American Medical Association (AMA) and awarded to elected and career public servants in national, state, and local governments for outstanding government service. (wikipedia.org)
  • Data from these analyses suggest that 1) blood samples are more sufficiently acquired and can be used to evaluate recent acute exposure and 2) use of a real-time mercury vapor analyzer can help public health officials determine the magnitude of exposures and help prevent reexposures. (cdc.gov)
  • By 1926, 18 states had some version of county child welfare boards whose purpose was to coordinate public and private child related work. (wikipedia.org)
  • By the mid-1960s, in response to public concern that resulted from this article, 49 U.S. states passed child-abuse reporting laws. (wikipedia.org)
  • Public Law 93-247) providing federal funding for wide-ranging federal and state child-maltreatment research and services. (wikipedia.org)
  • With funding and distribution from the US government, Skyshapers University has to date provided more than 20 percent of public elementary schools in the United States with Skyshapers supplemental curriculum to boost academic achievement and motivation. (wikipedia.org)
  • In partnership with The Department of Health and Human Services, other government agencies and corporate sponsors, The Skyshapers Foundation developed and executed one of the largest outreach programs ever conducted by the Public Health Service in American schools. (wikipedia.org)
  • Due to high selenium levels, the public was strictly advised to limit fish consumption from the Salton Sea in 1986, after which any amount was likely a health risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • He is a retired neurosurgeon and neuroscientist, editor and author, medical historian and medical ethicist, public health critic, and advocate for the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, Faria was born in Sancti Spiritus, Cuba. (wikipedia.org)
  • if you don't conclude that guns are bad and that they need to be eradicated because they are a 'public health menace,' they are not published. (wikipedia.org)
  • He called for other medical journal editors to post research data online thereby allowing investigators to validate scientific conclusions before public policy is implemented, particularly in the area of public health. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the United States, sex-based separation of public restrooms began in the late 19th century as a response to women not having toilets available to them in the workplace. (wikipedia.org)
  • A combination of Victorian Era morals and concerns over public health fueled the desire to create separate toilet facilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Analyzing the health of a population and the threats is the basis for public health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Public health is interdisciplinary. (wikipedia.org)
  • Public health aims to improve the quality of life through prevention and treatment of disease, including mental health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Common public health initiatives include promoting handwashing and breastfeeding, delivery of vaccinations, suicide prevention and distribution of condoms to control the spread of sexually transmitted diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Modern public health practice requires multidisciplinary teams of public health workers and professionals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Access to health care and public health initiatives are difficult challenges in developing nations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Public health infrastructures are still forming. (wikipedia.org)
  • The focus of a public health intervention is to prevent and manage diseases, injuries and other health conditions through surveillance of cases and the promotion of healthy behaviors, communities and environments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Public health communications programs, vaccination programs and distribution of condoms are examples of common preventive public health measures. (wikipedia.org)
  • The World Health Organization (WHO) is the international agency that coordinates and acts on global public health issues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most countries have their own government public health agencies, sometimes known as ministries of health, to respond to domestic health issues. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, in the United States, the front line of public health initiatives are state and local health departments. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada is the national agency responsible for public health, emergency preparedness and response, and infectious and chronic disease control and prevention. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Public health system in India is managed by the Ministry of Health & Family Welfare of the government of India with state-owned health care facilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • There's a push and pull, as you know, between cheap alternatives for industry and public health concerns. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unfortunately, for example, take tobacco: It took 50, 60 years of research before policy catches up with what the science is showing- Laura Anderko, professor at Georgetown University and director of the Mid-Atlantic Center for Children's Health and the Environment commenting on public health practices in response to proposal to ban chlorpyrifos pesticide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most governments recognize the importance of public health programs in reducing the incidence of disease, disability, and the effects of aging and other physical and mental health conditions, although public health generally receives significantly less government funding compared with medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Public health programs providing vaccinations have made strides in promoting health, including the eradication of smallpox, a disease that plagued humanity for thousands of years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Policymakers at both the state and federal levels have relied on estimates like these in considering bans on smoking in public places, taxes on cigarettes, litigation to recoup medical expenditures, and other matters concerning tobacco. (gao.gov)
  • National Center for Biotechnology Information is an intramural division within National Library of Medicine that creates public databases in molecular biology, conducts research in computational biology, develops software tools for analyzing molecular and genomic data, and disseminates biomedical information, all for the better understanding of processes affecting human health and disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Welfare
  • He was then Counselor to the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare from 1970 to 1972. (wikipedia.org)
  • U.S. federal laws that govern CPS agencies include: Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) Multi-Ethnic Placement Act (MEPA) Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA) Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504) Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) 42 U.S.C. Section 1983, and depending on the circumstances 1985. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1825, states enacted laws giving social-welfare agencies the right to remove neglected children from their parents and from the streets. (wikipedia.org)
  • Interventions
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides similar reviews concerning community, population, and health care system interventions related to cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and other chronic diseases ( 6 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • officials
  • According to the article, A review of memos, e-mail and other contracting documents obtained by The Washington Post show that in a rush to meet congressional mandates to establish the information analysis and infrastructure protection offices, agency officials routinely waived rules designed to protect taxpayer money. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1962
  • The library moved to its current quarters in Bethesda, Maryland, on the campus of the National Institutes of Health, in 1962. (wikipedia.org)
  • bodies
  • The Office of Research Integrity (ORI) is one of the bodies concerned with research integrity in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • Legal scholar Terry S. Kogan lists four primary rationales for sex-segregated toilets as detailed by state statutes and related literature during this time period: sanitation, women's privacy, the protection of women's bodies, which were seen as weaker, and to protect social morality especially as it pertained to the nineteenth century ideology of separate spheres. (wikipedia.org)
  • federal
  • Hospitals participating in DAWN are non-federal, short-stay general hospitals that feature a 24-hour emergency department. (wikipedia.org)
  • Grantland Johnson was one of a limited number of United States politicians who had served in offices on the city, county, state, and federal levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • Twelve vetoes: On May 27, 1830, he vetoed a bill that would allow the Federal government to purchase stock in the Maysville, Washington, Paris, and Lexington Turnpike Road Company, which had been organized to construct a road linking Lexington and the Ohio River, the entirety of which would be in the state of Kentucky. (wikipedia.org)
  • Partly funded by the federal government, Child Protective Services (CPS) agencies were first established in response to the 1974 CAPTA which mandated that all states establish procedures to investigate suspected incidents of child maltreatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Extramural programs provide funding to research institutions that are not part of the Federal government of the United States - medical schools, universities, colleges, hospitals, research institutes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The United States National Library of Medicine (NLM), operated by the United States federal government, is the world's largest medical library. (wikipedia.org)
  • programs
  • In cutting back state programs and social services, Baker caused controversy from early on. (wikipedia.org)
  • Jonathan Moore (10 September 1932 - 8 March 2017) was United States Director of the Bureau of Refugee Programs from 1987 to 1989 and United States Representative to the United Nations Economic and Social Council from 1989 to 1992. (wikipedia.org)
  • In FY 2004, the PHS provided at least $30 billion for health research and development, primarily in the biomedical and behavioral sciences through its extramural and intramural programs. (wikipedia.org)
  • government
  • A U.S. government agency that is part of the National Institutes of Health. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Booz Allen Hamilton Inc. (/ˈbuːz ˈælən ˈhæməltən/, informally: Booz Allen) is an American management and information technology consulting firm, sometimes referred to as a government-services company, headquartered in McLean, Virginia, in Greater Washington, D.C., with 80 other offices around the globe. (wikipedia.org)
  • The report also recommended the removal of all country passenger services and small freight operations, but the government did not consider this to be politically feasible. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ACLU and PI filed a memo at the end of their investigation which called into question the ethics and legality of a government contractor (in this case Booz Allen) acting as auditors of a government program, when that contractor is heavily involved with those same agencies on other contracts. (wikipedia.org)
  • After working in government for eight years, Baker left to become CEO of Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates and later Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, a non-profit health benefits company. (wikipedia.org)
  • Washington: United States Government Printing Office. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since then a number of prominent individuals have received a Dr. Nathan Davis Award for outstanding government service. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition, demolition and waste-disposal firms and government agencies must take actions to ensure that elemental mercury is adequately secured before disposal. (cdc.gov)
  • In 1692, states and municipalities identified care for abused and neglected children as the responsibility of local government and private institutions. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1964
  • Laumann earned his Ph.D. in the Harvard Department of Social Relations in 1964, where he studied under George Homans, Talcott Parsons, and Harrison White. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2001
  • Cardiovascular disease, * cancer, and diabetes account for nearly 2 of every 3 deaths in the United States-close to 1.5 million people in 2001. (ahajournals.org)
  • Prevention
  • Current approaches to health promotion and prevention of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes do not approach the potential of the existing state of knowledge. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • While health care costs skyrocket, the national investment in prevention was estimated at less than 3% of the total annual health care expenditures ( 2 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • This report describes examples of meth-associated events, summarizes the events reported to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and suggests injury prevention recommendations, such as how to recognize and properly respond to meth laboratories. (cdc.gov)
  • Workplace
  • In 1887 Massachusetts became the first of the United States to pass legislation requiring any workplace with female employees to have a female-specific restroom. (wikipedia.org)
  • Assembly
  • His great-grandfather, Charles D. Baker (1846-1934), was an assistant United States attorney in New York, who served several years in the New York State Assembly. (wikipedia.org)
  • Johnson had announced plans for a political comeback in 2010 as he was running for his old seat on the Sacramento County Board of Supervisors that was being vacated after 4 terms by Roger Dickinson who was running for the State Assembly. (wikipedia.org)
  • consequences
  • This is the accessible text file for GAO report number GAO-03-942R entitled 'CDC's April 2002 Report On Smoking: Estimates of Selected Health Consequences of Cigarette Smoking Were Reasonable' which was released on August 18, 2003. (gao.gov)
  • July 16, 2003: The Honorable Richard Burr: House of Representatives: Subject: CDC's April 2002 Report On Smoking: Estimates of Selected Health Consequences of Cigarette Smoking Were Reasonable: Dear Mr. Burr: Despite a recent decline in the population that smokes, smoking is considered the leading cause of preventable death in this country. (gao.gov)
  • CDC, part of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), is a primary source of information on the health consequences of smoking tobacco. (gao.gov)
  • CDC reported its most recent estimates of selected health consequences of cigarette smoking in an April 2002 issue of its publication Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. (gao.gov)
  • In recognition of this, you asked us to review CDC's April 2002 report and determine whether its estimates of selected health consequences of cigarette smoking were reasonable. (gao.gov)
  • Data
  • The first year of TEDS-A data is 1992, while the first year of TEDS-D is 2006. (umich.edu)
  • year
  • Last year, the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) issued its 27th report on the health status of the nation ( 3 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • An estimated 7--10 billion laboratory tests are performed each year in the United States ( 1,2 ), and laboratory test results influence approximately 70% of medical decisions ( 2--4 ). (cdc.gov)
  • governments
  • It had such extremely high concentrations of fecal coliform bacteria that it had a stench at its entry to the U.S. Under provisions of the 1944 Water Treaty with Mexico, the governments of the United States and Mexico agreed to give preferential attention to the solution of all border sanitation problems. (wikipedia.org)
  • existence
  • However, there is no known record or evidence to support the existence of a case of human fatality by result of marijuana overdose. (wikipedia.org)
  • Care
  • He was a cabinet official under two Governors of Massachusetts and spent ten years as CEO of Harvard Pilgrim Health Care. (wikipedia.org)
  • disability
  • For the trial of Causes pending in the respective District Courts of the United States, in case of the absence or disability of the Judges thereof, vetoed April 3, 1812. (wikipedia.org)
  • controversy
  • During 1993-1995, Faria was the editor of the Journal of the Medical Association of Georgia, taking that state medical journal to national prominence and controversy, which resulted in pressure on him to resign. (wikipedia.org)
  • national
  • In 1835, the Humane Society founded the National Federation of Child Rescue agencies to investigate child maltreatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • The PHS is composed of the following offices and agencies: National Institutes of Health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Located in Bethesda, Maryland, the NLM is an institute within the National Institutes of Health. (wikipedia.org)
  • HMD Prints & Photos, PP059772.6 Main reading room The gleaming new reading room of the History of Medicine Division, in the National Library of Medicine on the National Institutes of Health campus, Bethesda, Maryland. (wikipedia.org)
  • several
  • The resulting report recommended up to 8,000 job losses, including the withdrawal of staff from 94 country railway stations, withdrawing services on the Nyngan- Bourke line, Queanbeyan - Cooma line and Glen Innes- Wallangarra line, the discontinuation of several country passenger services (the Canberra XPT, the Silver City Comet to Broken Hill and various diesel locomotive hauled services) and the removal of sleeper trains from services to Brisbane and Melbourne. (wikipedia.org)
  • social
  • CPS is also known by the name of "Department of Social Services" (DSS) or simply "Social Services. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1958, amendments to the Social Security Act mandated that states fund child protection efforts. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health" takes into account physical, mental and social well-being. (wikipedia.org)
  • He has written extensively on social stratification, urban sociology, organizational sociology, health and aging, and is widely recognized as a pioneer in the areas of social network analysis and the sociology of sexuality. (wikipedia.org)
  • He moved to the University of Chicago in 1973, where he would eventually serve as the chair of the Department of Sociology, the Dean of the Social Sciences, as well as the Provost of the University. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medical
  • Both men received thermal burns and transported themselves to the hospital without assistance from emergency medical services. (cdc.gov)
  • After his return to the United States, Faria, who was then serving as chief-of-staff at HCA Coliseum Medical Centers in Macon, Georgia, convinced Dr. Thomas F. Frist, Jr., CEO of Hospital Corporation of America (HCA), to send humanitarian assistance to El Salvador. (wikipedia.org)
  • disease
  • Test results contribute to diagnosis and prognosis of disease, monitoring of treatment and health status, and population screening for disease. (cdc.gov)
  • largest
  • The United States is the largest grower of commercial crops that have been genetically engineered in the world, but not without domestic and international opposition. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the largest food recalls in US history, was the Taco Bell GMO recall, where a Bt corn plant not approved for human consumption due its risk as an allergen, had contaminated food products like the tacos at Taco Bell, and a huge percentage of US's seed supply. (wikipedia.org)
  • case
  • 1985). In this case, the plaintiff argued both for mandatory labeling on the basis of consumer demand, and that GMO foods should undergo the same testing requirements as food additives because they are "materially changed" and have potentially unidentified health risks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Education
  • An approved vendor of the NYC Department of Education for Textbooks and Teachers' Editions, Skyshapers University developed and is spearheading The SKY U Quest For Excellence Tour initiative in New York City schools. (wikipedia.org)
  • concern
  • Although there have been no recorded instances of harm to human health due to the consumption of genetically engineered foods, there is concern over their impact on health. (wikipedia.org)
  • offices
  • These advances have enabled more testing to be performed in emergency departments, hospital rooms, and physicians' offices and in nontraditional testing sites such as community counseling centers, pharmacies, nursing homes, ambulances, and health fairs. (cdc.gov)
  • treatment
  • Variables unique to TEDS-D, and not part of TEDS-A, are the length of stay, reason for leaving treatment, and service setting at time of discharge. (umich.edu)