• 1978
  • ACAS (1978) Royal Commission on the National Health Service: ACAS Evidence, Report No. 12 , ACAS, London, p. 19. (springer.com)
  • Further, in a submission to the Secretary of State for Social Services in October 1978 the RCN claimed that standards had been put at risk because of financial constraints, increased workloads and manpower shortages. (sochealth.co.uk)
  • wards
  • Although the main hospital building was completed by December, 1966, commissioning of the Hospital and opening of the wards proceeded slowly mainly because of a shortage of nursing staff. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first patients were admitted in March 1967 and before the end of the year several wards had been opened together with the Polyclinic and Accident and Emergency Unit thus making available to the residents of Petaling Jaya and the adjoining area of Petaling Jaya and the adjoining area of Kuala Lumpur a hospital service on a 24-hour basis. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 45-bed hospital commenced operations in 1974 with Obstetrics and Gynaecology wards, providing specialised healthcare for women. (wikipedia.org)
  • These plans provided for a large complex with two rows of pavilion wards separated by service buildings. (wikipedia.org)
  • The site was laid out about an east-west axis on which service and ancillary buildings were centred with identical pairs of pavilion wards, males to the south and females to the north laid equidistant from the centre and from each other. (wikipedia.org)
  • The wards and service buildings were also of symmetrical design reinforced and connected by a continuous covered walkway. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first complex constructed on the new hospital site comprised three brick buildings, a central administrative core flanked by wards, as well as a separate medical superintendent's residence and a palisade fence with gates along Walker Street. (wikipedia.org)
  • For about eighty years, from the 1860s, all wards in hospitals built in Queensland were based on the principles of the pavilion plan which emerged as a development of hospital design in Europe in the 1850s. (wikipedia.org)
  • By the 1870s and 1880s many pavilion plan type hospital wards were being constructed in major hospitals through Queensland. (wikipedia.org)
  • Of about eighty pavilion planned wards constructed in Queensland during the nineteenth century only six remain, three of these are at the Royal Brisbane Hospital, one at Isisford and one at Ipswich. (wikipedia.org)
  • incomes policy
  • At the Annual Congress on 8 September 1976 the TUC rejected a motion which called for a return to free collective bargaining (which meant no incomes policy at all) once Phase I expired on 1 August 1977. (wikipedia.org)
  • On 15 July 1977, the Chancellor of the Exchequer Denis Healey announced Phase III of the incomes policy in which there was to be a phased return to free collective bargaining, without "a free-for-all. (wikipedia.org)
  • growth
  • During the past decade the total number of proprietary hospitals has been increasing again, mainly because of the rapid growth of the corporate-owned multi-institutional hospital chains. (massmed.org)
  • involvement
  • An infectious epidemic outbreak, characterized by acute onset of severe influenza-like symptoms and accompanied by severe venous involvement, occurred in 1975 in a community hospital in Carmichael, a suburb of Sacramento, CA. Vascular features ranged from spontaneous bruising with numbness, tingling, and burning to painfully swollen veins. (iacfsme.org)
  • Through Creeley came an ancillary involvement with the first two issues of Creeley's magazine, Black Mountain Review, which resulted in the occasional inclusion of Blackburn in the Black Mountain school of poets. (wikipedia.org)
  • Centre
  • University of Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC) formerly known as University Hospital is a government-funded medical institution located in Pantai Dalam, southwest corner of Kuala Lumpur, the dynamic and bustling capital city of Malaysia. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2014, Parkway East Hospital, together with other hospitals under the group of Parkway Hospitals, works in close partnership with Parkway Patient Assistance Centre in providing a comprehensive gamut of services that supports and reinforces the medical expertise available in Sri Lanka. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Clinical Center is also the single emergency centre and inpatient hospital for the population of the city of Novi Sad and the region of South Bačka. (wikipedia.org)
  • By 1859 a Committee of Management had established another hospital, near the new centre of the town, at the corner of Ferry and Albert Streets, but was moved in 1863 to a site on the corner of Lennox and Walker Streets. (wikipedia.org)
  • Two of the nineteenth century buildings extant at the Maryborough Hospital, namely C-Block and Centre Block, are remnants of a pavilion planned hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • aspects
  • Parry, N. and Parry, J. (1977) 'Professionalism and Unionism: Aspects of Class Conflict in the NHS', Sociological Review , 25 (4). (springer.com)
  • 1999
  • For details of the history of each National Health Service, particularly since 1999, see: History of the National Health Service (England) History of NHS Scotland History of NHS Wales History of Health and Social Care in Northern Ireland The NHS was the first universal health care system established anywhere in the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • nurses
  • Shortly after the hospital was opened, the KSB Hospital School for Nurses began educating young women who studied for a three-year term to become registered nurses. (wikipedia.org)
  • When established on the site in 1867, the General Hospital contained a ward block with accommodation for 100 patients, a residence for the medical superintendent and a block with kitchen facilities and nurses accommodation. (wikipedia.org)
  • 13.1 Nurses, midwives and health visitors play a vital part in the care of patients in hospitals, nursing homes and the community. (sochealth.co.uk)
  • Much of what we say here applies equally to nurses, midwives and health visitors and our use of "nurse" and "nursing service" should be interpreted accordingly. (sochealth.co.uk)
  • There is no doubt that nurses are under pressure in many places, and services to patients suffer. (sochealth.co.uk)
  • entities
  • All entities in the facility, including the hospital, physician offices, retail areas and other services are tenants of the Limited Partnership formed at Medical City's inception. (wikipedia.org)
  • As a result, the two entities were merged in October 1977, under the name of Guyana Mining Enterprise Limited (GUYMINE). (wikipedia.org)
  • staff
  • Each stable has been provided with an ancillary building such as hay godown, chaff-cutting sheds, calving lines, and residential accommodation for the cattle owner and their staff. (wikipedia.org)
  • After nationalising Britain's voluntary and municipal hospitals, the new NHS took responsibility for 360,000 staff in England and Wales and a further 45,000 in Scotland. (wikipedia.org)
  • They have constant and direct contact with patients, in most cases the service is provided throughout 24 hours, and they give more personal care than many other groups of staff. (sochealth.co.uk)
  • Because of ever-increasing health care costs, staff expense, lack of qualified health care professionals to work in prisons, lack of visionary correctional leadership (with exceptions), and ever-increasing litigation, more and more states have privatized the mental health and medical services. (jaapl.org)
  • cardiovascular
  • In the 1920s and 1930s, Grasslands Hospital specialized in treating adults and children with tuberculosis, polio, scarlet fever, and diphtheria and later became known for its cardiovascular services and became one of the first public institutions to establish a renal dialysis unit. (wikipedia.org)
  • Heart Center: Known for its cardiac surgery and cardiac catheterization programs, as well as its Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy National Center of Excellence, the Heart Center at Westchester Medical Center offers cardiovascular services to patients of all ages. (wikipedia.org)
  • acres
  • In 1977, around 200 ha (490 acres) of land was carved out from Aarey village to establish Film City. (wikipedia.org)
  • psychiatry
  • Prior to coming to DMH, Dr. Childs was Chief and Director of Psychiatry at the Carney Hospital, in Dorchester, MA, a position she held since 1996. (unt.edu)
  • She served as a consultant in Child Psychiatry at the Dana Farber Institute and Children s Hospital, and worked as a child psychiatrist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Health Plan. (unt.edu)
  • 1975
  • The temporary Holland Drive terminal (located next to the City Shuttle Service terminus), started operating in November 1975 for certain bus routes. (wikipedia.org)
  • pavilion
  • These were designed by colonial architect JJ Clark and based on contemporary principles of hospital design about the pavilion plan. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first pavilion plan was used in the design of the Lariboisière Hospital in Paris, which was a series of detached pavilions, where increased ventilation assisted patients in ridding themselves of their illness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Committee
  • Institutional Review Board or Ethics Committee approval was not required for the data collection and analysis of the presented hospital outbreak. (iacfsme.org)
  • Initially, the Brisbane General Hospital was managed by a voluntary committee and funded by public subscriptions and government subsidies. (wikipedia.org)
  • By the early 1900s the Hospital Committee faced a severe financial crisis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Trade Union Congress Health Services Committee (1981) Improving Industrial Relations in the National Health Service , TUC, London, p. 143. (springer.com)
  • 13.3 In preparing this chapter we have been conscious of the major review of the nursing service undertaken by the Briggs Committee which reported in 1972. (sochealth.co.uk)
  • 1988
  • In 1988, KSB Hospital purchased Commerce Towers and soon after constructed a walkway over Crawford Street to connect the building to the hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • Harrison, S. (1988) 'The Closed Shop and the National Health Service: A Case Study in Public Sector Labour Relations' , Journal of Social Policy, 17(1), p. 61. (springer.com)
  • 1947
  • The NHS in Scotland was established as a separate entity with its own legislation, the National Health Service (Scotland) Act 1947, from the foundation of the NHS in 1948. (wikipedia.org)
  • undertaken
  • In addition to the activities of maintaining the large herds of milch animals in Aarey Colony, certain activities like running primary school for the benefit of children of residents of the Aarey Colony and running 24 bed hospital are also undertaken by Aarey authorities. (wikipedia.org)
  • addition
  • In addition, a complex of ancillary services, including a machine shop, carpentry shop, and an electrical shop a power generation and distribution system, potable water supply and a hospital was developed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another addition was built in 1926 at a cost of $47,000, enlarging the hospital to a 60-bed capacity and adding two solaria for the comfort and enjoyment of patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • This addition brought KSB Hospital to an 89-bed capacity. (wikipedia.org)
  • public
  • administrators in public hospitals in other cities objected to participation by private hospitals "that care for few or no charity patients" and the U.S. Treasury Department opposed use of such programs to finance private ventures, estimating that such programs "cost the government $100 million to $300 million in lost tax revenue annually. (wikipedia.org)
  • Meanwhile, in 1952, income had risen to £671,633 - a twenty-fold increase in 20 years - and grants to public hospitals and medical charities exceeded £100,000 for the year. (wikipedia.org)
  • The name National Health Service (NHS) is used to refer to the four public health services of England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales, individually or collectively, though only England's NHS officially has this title. (wikipedia.org)
  • Later SBS started public bus services to Jurong Island. (wikipedia.org)
  • In November 1957, the board authorized a $1,250,000 hospital expansion program and launched a drive for $750,000 in public subscriptions to finance the major portion of the project. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Hospital Act of 1923 signalled the transition from hospitals operating as charitable institutions to being regarded as essential public community services funded and maintained by government. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Childs has an extensive background in providing services to people with serious mental illness, which includes both the private and public sectors. (unt.edu)
  • establishment
  • In 1977, the hospital became a teaching hospital, following the establishment of the Faculty of Medicine within the University of Novi Sad. (wikipedia.org)
  • In May 1895 Judge Solomon Hicks Bethea purchased land for $3,500 and gave it to the City of Dixon for the establishment of a hospital in the memory of his wife, Katherine Shaw Bethea, who in her short lifetime had been deeply interested in the establishment of a hospital for Dixon, and during her last illness frequently expressed the wish that such work might be accomplished in the near future. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1957
  • The hallmark symptom of painful veins appeared to be similar but more severe and extensive than the Epidemic Phlebodynia documented in three other hospital epidemics reported in 1953, 1957, and 1965 (1-3). (iacfsme.org)
  • community
  • It is operated by Hospital Corporation of America Medical City opened its doors after Dr. Frank Seay cut the ribbon that opened Medical City Dallas Hospital to the residents of the community on October 2, 1974. (wikipedia.org)
  • Despite many difficulties of the World War II years, including the severe drain on manpower resources and the cessation of many employment groups, the Fund's revenues continued to grow, indicating the high value now placed by the community on an equitable and efficient hospital insurance system. (wikipedia.org)
  • In fact, the majority of hospitals in the United States were proprietary until shortly after the turn of the century, when the small doctor-owned hospitals began to be replaced by larger and more sophisticated community or church-owned nonprofit institutions. (massmed.org)
  • There were also 146 Local Health Authorities, running health centres, ambulances services and other community services, and 140 Executive Councils, managing General Practices, NHS dentistry, pharmacists and opticians. (wikipedia.org)
  • Curative and caring services and related research contribute a great deal to individual treatment and their importance must not be under-rated, but on the basis of past experience a substantial improvement in national and community health is more likely to be achieved by preventive measures. (sochealth.co.uk)
  • The two main reasons for underdetection of glaucoma are poor uptake of community eye care services and cases missed by primary eye care services [ 3 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • name
  • In 1946, due approval was obtained from the State Government and the name of the Fund was changed to the Hospitals Contribution Fund of NSW. (wikipedia.org)
  • This ordinance, dated November 1, 1895, also stated that the Mayor, with the approval of the City Council, appoint a board of nine women directors chosen from the citizens at large, which would be authorized to accept the donations of money and real or personal property in the name of the hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • care
  • The hospital complex served as home to Dallas' first Health Maintenance Organization (HMO), a set-fee medical program established through a joint HMO venture between the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program and Prudential Insurance Company of America. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mackenzie Health is a company based in Richmond Hill, Ontario, Canada that provides health care services in southern York Region. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Clinical Center of Vojvodina (Клинички центар Војводине, Klinički centar Vojvodine) is a hospital providing tertiary level health care services for the population of Vojvodina, the northern province of Serbia. (wikipedia.org)
  • They focused on ways to address the high infant morbidity and mortality rates, lack of medical and dental services, and the paucity of accessibility and affordability to health care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Newport Coast Pathology (NCP), Inc. is committed to providing high quality care and exceptional anatomic pathology services for the patient and the referring physician, respectively. (ocma.org)
  • Developments in medicine, increasing population and changing social conditions and attitudes to health care resulted in increasing numbers of people seeking treatment at the Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health care infrastructure and services are planned and developed through Five Year Plans (FYP) of the Ministry of Health. (wikipedia.org)
  • their morale may be seriously affected if the standard of care they are able to offer their patients falls, and this may lead to some of them leaving the service. (sochealth.co.uk)
  • Co-chaired by the secretaries of health and human services and labor, the Commission was charged with developing a broader understanding of issues facing the rapidly evolving health care delivery system and building consensus on ways to assure and improve the quality of health care. (unt.edu)
  • make
  • The curative and caring services make the essential contribution to the alleviation of suffering and always will, but we regret that more emphasis has not been placed in the past on the preventive role of the NHS. (sochealth.co.uk)
  • complex
  • Developer Trammell Crow and his partners chose to locate the hospital and medical office tower on a 250-acre plot in the Park Central area of Dallas partly because preliminary research showed that as of 1972 when the development was planned, 85 percent of all MDs in Dallas County lived within 15 minutes'driving of the new complex. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • The principal investigator of the outbreak was asked by the hospital to see and manage all the infected patients, and all patients requested that he continue as their treating physician. (iacfsme.org)
  • So, where did all the [state hospital] patients go? (jaapl.org)
  • laboratory
  • In 2013, Pathway Genomics Corporation, a San Diego-based clinical laboratory that offers genetic testing services internationally, partnered with Parkway Laboratory Services Ltd, an ancillary service of Parkway Pantai Limited to offer Pathway Fit, a comprehensive saliva-based nutrigenetic test that reports on a patient's genetic propensity for diet, nutritional needs, metabolic health factors and food reactions. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2013 also saw the formation of an exclusive partnership between Sengenics, a leading genetic diagnostics company and Parkway Laboratory Services to provide cutting-edge genetic tests in Singapore including Sengenics CardioSURE Heart disease genetic risk test and Sequenom's MaterniT21 PLUS non-invasive pre-natal diagnostic test that covers Trisomy 21, 18 and 13. (wikipedia.org)
  • Newport Coast Pathology, Inc., was founded in 2010 by Mani Ehteshami, MD, a pathologist who recognized a need for a local laboratory that would provide personalized service. (ocma.org)
  • The war ended soon after however, and he spent the rest of his service as a laboratory technician in Colorado. (wikipedia.org)
  • comprehensive
  • Neuroscience Center: Providing neurosurgical and neurological services to both adults and children, the Center features "knifeless" brain surgery, a comprehensive epilepsy program and a Cerebrovascular Center. (wikipedia.org)
  • 5.1 Although the promotion of "a comprehensive health service designed to secure improvement… in the prevention" of illness is one of the duties laid on health ministers by the NHS Acts, only a small proportion of NHS resources is devoted to prevention. (sochealth.co.uk)
  • facilities
  • The new owners refurbished and modernised the existing facilities, and renamed it Saint Mark's Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike typical terminals in Singapore, bus services do not stop for extended periods, due to the lack of bus parking facilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1977, UHC received a grant to construct permanent facilities at the Orange Cove and Parlier locations. (wikipedia.org)
  • health service
  • The Emergency Hospital Service established in 1939 gave a taste of what a National Health Service might look like. (wikipedia.org)
  • A national health service was one of the fundamental assumptions in the Beveridge Report which Arthur Greenwood, Labour's Deputy Leader and wartime Cabinet Minister with responsibility for post-war reconstruction had successfully pressed the cabinet to commission from economist and social reformer William Beveridge. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] The National Health Service was a major employer from its foundation. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1979, in a memorandum to the Royal Commission on the Health Service, ACAS drew attention to problems in the development of appropriate local collective bargaining machinery in the NHS. (springer.com)
  • 1888
  • This was officially reserved as a Hospital Reserve after the hospital was constructed, on 4 October 1888 and Henry Palmer, Henry Walker and William Southerden were appointed as trustees. (wikipedia.org)
  • establish
  • An ordinance was passed to establish and maintain a hospital for the use and benefit of the citizens of Dixon. (wikipedia.org)
  • The whole point of the Whitley Council machinery was to establish uniform terms and conditions of service at national level but applied locally through joint consultative committees (JCCs). (springer.com)
  • provide
  • HCF (The Hospitals Contribution Fund of Australia) was formed in 1932 to provide health insurance cover to Australians. (wikipedia.org)
  • A scheme for a medical benefits fund, to provide insurance against the costs of medical services, had been envisaged by then MHCF and members of the medical profession in 1939 but had been deferred because of the war. (wikipedia.org)
  • 6 . A network including at least one mobile field device configured to provide communication with a plurality of patient medical monitoring devices, and the network electronically connected to databases maintained by a hospital. (google.ca)