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  • 1978
  • Environmental psychology is a special field of psychology modeling the influence of diverse environments (e.g. buildings, rooms, landscapes, or other environments of human beings) on emotion and behavior (Mehrabian 1978, 1976). (acrwebsite.org)
  • His works on musicology include: Perspectivas de la investigación musical actual (1976), La forma de las formas musicales (1978) and La génesis del espacio musical (1986). (wikipedia.org)
  • 1983
  • In Diagnosticar la Musicalidad, the author presents to the general public the results of an extensive investigation, conducted between 1976 and 1983 with the purpose to improve the musical tests performed in Cuban schools to select new music students. (wikipedia.org)
  • humans
  • The present manuscript discusses the time-emotion paradox in time psychology: although humans are able to accurately estimate time as if they possess a specific mechanism that allows them to measure time (i.e. an internal clock), their representations of time are easily distorted by the context. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • Professor
  • He is Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry, Chief of the Division of Sleep and Chronobiology in the Department of Psychiatry, and Associate Director of the Center for Sleep and Respiratory Neurobiology in the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • emotions
  • However, high orientation pleasantness is necessary, otherwise the store atmospher is perceived as cluttered and chaotic by the consumers and negative emotions and avoidance are the result. (acrwebsite.org)
  • In this manuscript, we first present the internal clock models and then examine the results of the few studies that have investigated how emotions affect our perception of time. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • Transactional reader-response theory, led by Louise Rosenblatt and supported by Wolfgang Iser, involves a transaction between the text's inferred meaning and the individual interpretation by the reader influenced by their personal emotions and knowledge. (wikipedia.org)
  • series
  • David Hamilton and Robert Gifford (1976) conducted a series of experiments that demonstrated how stereotypic beliefs regarding minorities could derive from illusory correlation processes. (wikipedia.org)
  • To test their hypothesis, Hamilton and Gifford had research participants read a series of sentences describing either desirable or undesirable behaviors, which were attributed to either Group A or Group B. Abstract groups were used so that no previously established stereotypes would influence results. (wikipedia.org)
  • The subject was reported to have been successful in a series of 133 trials but the results dropped to chance level when performed before a group of scientists in Cambridge. (wikipedia.org)
  • theory
  • The present paper delivers insights on arousal theory and presents empirical results from a pilot study using EDA to measure arousal. (acrwebsite.org)
  • Along this line, research on theory-based theories of concepts, which argue that things like knowledge of causal relations, in addition to correlational structure, factor in to how we divide the world into categories. (blogspot.com)
  • teacher
  • 3. Department of Languages and Literature: The history of Languages and Literature Department dates back to 1976 when the Persian Literature Department was founded in Teacher Training University. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to Moskowitz & Hayman (1976), once a teacher loses control of their classroom, it becomes increasingly more difficult for them to regain that control. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also, research from Berliner (1988) and Brophy & Good (1986) shows that the time a teacher must take to correct misbehavior caused by poor classroom management skills results in a lower rate of academic engagement in the classroom. (wikipedia.org)
  • emotional
  • Within this theoretical framework we want to defend, in the present manuscript, the idea that temporal illusions such as that time is being shorter or longer, which it really is, are not the result of any additional emotional feeling that disturbs the functioning of the internal clock. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • facts
  • Key features of GBKR, the graph-based knowledge representation and reasoning model developed by Chein and Mugnier and the Montpellier group (Chein & Mugnier 2009), can be summarized as follows: All kinds of knowledge (ontology, rules, constraints and facts) are labeled graphs, which provide an intuitive and easily understandable means to represent knowledge. (wikipedia.org)
  • work
  • Dinges' work has contributed to our knowledge of the effects of sleep disorders, the recovery potential of naps, the nature of sleep inertia and the impact of cumulative sleep debt. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] As a result of his work for the Child Research Project, the Treatment and Education of Autistic and Related Communication Handicapped Children (TEACCH) was created in 1971 and he was made co-director in 1972. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to the work of a recent task force commissioned by the Society of Pediatric Psychology, Division 54 of the American Psychological Association, 12 topic areas adapted from Roberts et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • major
  • As a 16-year-old (1932) she entered the University of California at Los Angeles as a combination pre-medicine and psychology major while continuing her ballet dancing. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Above all, the historicists stressed the depth of major historical changes and the resulting challenges to cumulative scientific progress. (stanford.edu)
  • This compendium is a major source of information for professional practitioners, researchers in psychology, and for anyone interested in applied psychology. (worldcat.org)
  • variety
  • The Bone Forest" "Thorn" "The Shapechanger" "The Boy who Jumped the Rapids" "Time of the Tree" "Magic Man" "Scarrowfell" "The Time Beyond Age" The short stories in The Bone Forest previously appeared in a variety of publications between 1976 and 1989. (wikipedia.org)
  • years
  • Since the Soviet Chess Federation controlled all foreign invitations, opportunities outside the Soviet bloc were highly sought, and many players with better results, such as Ratmir Kholmov, never received one during their prime years. (wikipedia.org)
  • self-knowledge
  • Self-deception involves convincing oneself of a truth (or lack of truth) so that one does not reveal any self-knowledge of the deception. (wikipedia.org)
  • p. 47) Ouspensky's reputation is presently degenerated to being a follower of Gurdjieff rather than a partner (see below) and the apex of esotericism, self-knowledge, and metaphysical thought. (wikipedia.org)
  • time
  • Existing studies on the relationships between emotion and time suggest that these contextual variations in subjective time do not result from the incorrect functioning of the internal clock but rather from the excellent ability of the internal clock to adapt to events in one's environment. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • The Time Beyond Age" first appeared in Supernova, 1976. (wikipedia.org)
  • studies
  • ABSTRACT - As reported in different empirical studies based on insights of environmental psychology, visual merchandising and interior design of store environments must evoke an optimum level of customers arousal. (acrwebsite.org)
  • although
  • He also missed advancing from the Soviet semi-final at Leningrad 1951, although complete results from this are unavailable. (wikipedia.org)
  • several
  • From a computational viewpoint, the graph homomorphism notion was recognized in the 1990s as a central notion, and complexity results and efficient algorithms have been obtained in several domains. (wikipedia.org)
  • paper
  • In the first published paper on CGs, John F. Sowa (Sowa 1976) used them to represent the conceptual schemas used in database systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • group
  • This results in an attempt to distinguish the minority group from the majority, leading to these differences being learned more quickly. (wikipedia.org)
  • He concluded that a leader's knowledge can only contribute to performance if it is efficiently communicated, hence requiring a directive leader and also a compliant group that is willing to undertake the commands of the leader. (wikipedia.org)
  • effects
  • Secondary effects on comprehension and reduced reading experience may result, which, in turn, can lead to impoverished vocabulary and the general knowledge base. (frontiersin.org)
  • base
  • COGUI is a graphical user interface dedicated to the construction of a GBKR knowledge base (it integrates COGITANT and, among numerous functionalities, it contains a translator from GBKR to RDF/S and conversely). (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • Results of the study show that positive, desirable behaviors were not seen as distinctive so people were accurate in their associations. (wikipedia.org)
  • views
  • In the dialogues of Phaedo, written in his "middle period" (360 B.C.E.) Plato expressed his distinctive views about the nature of knowledge, reality, and the soul: When the soul and body are united, then nature orders the soul to rule and govern, and the body to obey and serve. (wikipedia.org)
  • hard
  • Eventually he became a barber and, as a result of hard effort and intelligence, owned shops all over the United States and Canada. (encyclopedia.com)
  • particular
  • If an officer had a particular "negative" attribute given off to the commanding officer, it would correlate in the rest of that soldier's results. (wikipedia.org)
  • events
  • He competed in three Russian Championships: at Yaroslavl 1951, in his home town of Saratov in 1953, and at Rostov-on-Don in 1954, but complete results of these events are also unavailable. (wikipedia.org)
  • acquisition
  • However, this meaning was contested, notably by radical behaviorists such as John B. Watson , who in his 1913 manifesto defined the discipline of psychology as the acquisition of information useful to the control of behavior. (mashpedia.com)
  • Greek
  • As is expressed in the first few paragraphs of Physics, they were interested in discovering the principles, or elements of the knowledge, which was an entirely new goal in Greek education. (wikipedia.org)
  • culture
  • We are this accuracy to increase a more marine-based chorology of culture Foothills in assault to complement results we are have more early to your items. (weitz.org)
  • These concepts were first introduced by the anthropologist Edward T. Hall in his 1976 book Beyond Culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • scientific
  • other American, January 2007 download Fractional Calculus with Applications in Mechanics: Vibrations by results of Scientific American Magazinevol. (superquadri.com.br)
  • He went on to explore what it was that seemed to protect these offspring and, as a parallel result, the scientific investigation of resilience began. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The final step in a research project was analysis of all the information to ascertain "scientific knowledge" (episteme) of the "elements" (stoicheia), the "causes" (aitia), and the "first principles" (archai) of the topic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, the philosophies of biology, of psychology, and of the social sciences explore whether the scientific studies of human nature can achieve objectivity or are inevitably shaped by values and by social relations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Akil is also one of seven leading scientists that comprise the Hope For Depression Research Task Force, who together have developed an exceptional research plan that combines the most advanced knowledge in genetics, epigenetics, molecular biology, electrophysiology, and brain imaging in an effort to accelerate cutting-edge scientific research pertaining to depression and its related mood and emotional disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • individual
  • However, before such a conclusion can be drawn, evidence is required that demonstrates a larger benefit of providing acupuncture treatment than summing the benefit of providing the individual components of acupuncture alone, which, to our knowledge, has not yet been tested. (hindawi.com)
  • positive
  • The literature suggests that the difference between making a negative or positive decision depends on the person's level of positive psychology constructs (Snyder & Lopez, 2009) and specifically salutogenic functioning (see Cilliers & Kossuth, 2004). (scielo.org.za)
  • Economic
  • here, for Results the integration was battles and terms of Economic order of water in lbs. (superquadri.com.br)
  • His first six years in power resulted in rapid economic recovery from the Great Depression, the abrogation of restrictions imposed on Germany after World War I and the annexation of territories that were home to millions of ethnic Germans which gave him significant popular support. (wikipedia.org)
  • Industrial
  • 1982). Due to its important implications in the workplace, person-environment fit has maintained a prominent position in Industrial and organizational psychology and related fields (for a review of theories that address person-environment fit in organizations, see Edwards, 2008). (wikipedia.org)
  • History
  • Freud claimed that a clash between Eros and civilization results in the history of Man being one of his repression: "Our civilization is, generally speaking, founded on the suppression of instincts. (wikipedia.org)
  • fields
  • A simplified example mentioned by Hall is that scientists working in "hard science" fields e.g., chemistry and physics, tend to have lower-context cultures comparing with scientists working with living systems, as the former fields are dealing with knowledge that is closer to the reality than the latter ones, which means higher explicitness and clarity is required in the former's communication processes. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • The results were often ideology-driven "statistics," such as the notorious (and false) claim that more men beat their wives on Super Bowl Sunday, which dramatized the cause of domestic violence victims but further confused an already intricate issue. (motherjones.com)
  • France
  • He directed large-scale rearmament and on 1 September 1939 invaded Poland, resulting in Britain and France declaring war on Germany. (wikipedia.org)
  • She refers to this instance as a "turning point" in her life where she realized that a woman who grew up far away from the centers of knowledge, Great Britain, France, and the United States, could become a great scientist, like Curie. (wikipedia.org)
  • reality
  • For example, Langs' focus on how human beings cope with reality and traumas resulted in his identifying three forms of unconsciously experienced death anxiety and in his showing how each form can mark a universal or archetypal path to devastation, not only individually but collectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • allows
  • An elaborated code indicates that the speaker is expressing his/her idea by phrasing from an abundant selection of alternatives without assuming the listener shares lots of common knowledge, which allows the speaker to explain their idea explicitly. (wikipedia.org)
  • common
  • The three most common explanations proposed to account for improvements following both real and placebo acupuncture are that (1) needling is only one of a variety of active components in acupuncture treatment, (2) the placebo controls used in the studies are, in fact, active treatments and, therefore, invalid placebos, or (3) improvement following both real and placebo acupuncture results from the placebo effect. (hindawi.com)
  • This would suggest that a lack of difference between real and placebo acupuncture in RCTs may result from the omission of important components of acupuncture, such as facilitating patients active involvement in their recovery and lifestyle advice, that is common in these trials [ 6 , 11 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • research
  • In 1994, Congress asked the National Research Council, an independent Washington, D.C., think tank, to evaluate the state of knowledge about domestic abuse. (motherjones.com)
  • interviews
  • the information will soon be published by the Justice Department in a report summarizing the results of in-depth, face-to-face interviews with a representative sample of 860 men and women whom researchers have been following since birth. (motherjones.com)