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  • 1900
  • By 1856, the asylum had expanded to take 400 patients, and growth continued throughout the century - with over 1,000 patients in the asylum by 1900. (wikipedia.org)
  • David Marshall Williams (November 13, 1900 - January 8, 1975) was a convicted murderer and was the American firearms designer of the floating chamber and the short-stroke piston. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1900, the hospital began to expand its campus, with two additional women's wards and four men's being added to the main building. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1971
  • cutaneous reactions.Abstract Ten thousand new patients were seen between January 1971 and January 1975 at the Department of Pediatric Dermatology. (scribd.com)
  • The main Eisenhower hospital, designed by Edward Durrell Stone, opened in November 1971, containing 289 beds. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hospital has been in operation on South Clark Street since 1905 and in its present $6 million facility since 1971, serving residents of ' Carroll and several surrounding counties. (newspapers.com)
  • The Dee , as it was called for 59 years, began a second life on November 10, 1971, when the new facility bearing the same name opened its doors adjacent to the McKay, as an integral part of the McKay-Dee Hospital Center . (wikipedia.org)
  • 1980
  • It was forced to close for five years during the Pol Pot regime from 1975 to 1980 and sadly, during this time, many doctors and educated medical professionals were killed. (projects-abroad.org)
  • In 1980 Favaloro established the 'Basic Investigation Laboratory' (Laboratorio de Investigación Básica), which was long financed with his own money and which, at the time, depended upon the support of the Research and Teaching Department of the Fundación Favaloro. (wikipedia.org)
  • International Journal of Family Psychiatry, 1, 357-372, 1980 Letter from Dr. Haldane in response to Dr. Roger Kennedy on the subject of Families in an In-patient setting, alluding to the Cassel Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • wards
  • During the Second World War it had wards for both military and civilian patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 253-bed super specialty block, spread over 160,000 sq ft (15,000 m2) houses the outpatient clinics and inpatient wards of the six super specialties, eight operation theatres, 29-bed six intensive care units, haemo dialysis unit and renal transplant unit, apart from administrative blocks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although the main hospital building was completed by December, 1966, commissioning of the Hospital and opening of the wards proceeded slowly mainly because of a shortage of nursing staff. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first patients were admitted in March 1967 and before the end of the year several wards had been opened together with the Polyclinic and Accident and Emergency Unit thus making available to the residents of Petaling Jaya and the adjoining area of Petaling Jaya and the adjoining area of Kuala Lumpur a hospital service on a 24-hour basis. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was heralded as a landmark in Singapore's medical history for igniting the systematic development of hospital services: the hospital was furnished with 800 beds and comprised three separate blocks accommodating male and female wards. (wikipedia.org)
  • doctors had to travel long distances to various wards scattered throughout the hospital to treat patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although Dix had expressed interest that Jacksonville State Hospital be opened by 1849, it wasn't until November 3, 1851, that the first two wards were ready for occupancy and the first patient, Sophronia McElhiney, of McLean County, was admitted. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1961
  • In 1917, the Department of Public Welfare assumed responsibility for Jacksonville State Hospital and retained control until the creation of the Illinois Department of Mental Health in 1961 (L. 1961, p. 2666). (wikipedia.org)
  • Since The King's Daughters established the hospital in 1961, CHKD has undergone two major renovations and expansions and is now at the heart of a comprehensive system of caring dedicated exclusively to children. (chkd.org)
  • On April 23, 1961, these determined women were thrilled to dedicate Children's Hospital of The King's Daughters , a three-story, 88-bed hospital, where every child would be treated equally, regardless of their financial circumstances. (chkd.org)
  • On May 5, 1961, the first children were admitted to CHKD. (chkd.org)
  • centre
  • The Medical College campus houses several hospitals and institutions, other than the Medical College Hospital (MCH), including the College of Nursing, College of Pharmaceutical sciences, Regional Cancer Centre, Thiruvananthapuram Dental College, Sree Chitra Thirunal Institute of Medical Sciences and Technology, Priyadarshini Institute of Paramedical Sciences and Sree Avittom Thirunal Hospital for Women and Children (SAT Hospital). (wikipedia.org)
  • The cancer block was inaugurated in 1958 and after two decades, the Regional Cancer Centre, one of the premier cancer care center catering the needs of South India was established. (wikipedia.org)
  • In October 2012, the new one-site hospital was renamed "Health Sciences North" as it evolved into an academic research centre, as well as a hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • University of Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC) formerly known as University Hospital is a government-funded medical institution located in Pantai Dalam, southwest corner of Kuala Lumpur, the dynamic and bustling capital city of Malaysia. (wikipedia.org)
  • When Knowle closed in 1996, local services devolved to Gosport War Memorial Hospital and to Hewat House (in Gosport) as well as to the Meadows in-patient unit and the Osborn Centre in Fareham. (wikipedia.org)
  • practice
  • Both groups of physicians still practice separately at each hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1920, the privately owned Medford Clinic and Hospital was established Dr. Conrad E. Nystrum (1869-1923), who had started his Medford practice in 1892. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Barlow TIPS Ventilator Weaning Protocol was developed by Barlow board-certified pulmonologists based on years of specialized respiratory care practice. (wikipedia.org)
  • I didn't want an outpatient practice with the overhead of an office," says Dr. Spencer, 63, "I wanted to do internal medicine in a hospital setting. (the-hospitalist.org)
  • Eventually, the third-generation physician made a bold leap-he started a hospital-based internal medicine practice in Everett, Wash. (the-hospitalist.org)
  • The THA protocol (THAP) group received verbal instructions and physiotherapy exercise demonstrations, and the THA physiotherapy care protocol (THAPCP) group received the same verbal instructions and demonstrations associated with daily exercise practice guided by a physiotherapist. (va.gov)
  • UMMC faculty and advanced practice providers see patients at several on- and off-site clinics. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1976
  • In 1976, the Public Health Department reported over 100 deficiencies following an inspection of the hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1976, Dr. Spencer knocked on lots of doors and convinced scores of Everett's primary care physicians that his caring for their hospitalized patients would free them to build their practices. (the-hospitalist.org)
  • In 1976 Dr. Spencer took stock of his career and recognized he wanted to be a hospital-based physician. (the-hospitalist.org)
  • The hospital has been featured in popular culture, used as the primary filming location for the 1975 film One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, as well as being the subject of a series of photographs by photographer Mary Ellen Mark in 1976. (wikipedia.org)
  • The plan was introduced in 1975 by the Whitlam Government as Medibank, and was limited to paying customers only in 1976 by the Fraser Government. (wikipedia.org)
  • cardiac care
  • The Saint Thomas Chest Pain Network is a division of Saint Thomas Health that coordinates with local emergency medical services (EMS) and hospitals to provide cardiac care services. (wikipedia.org)
  • HSN offers a variety of programs and services, with regional programs in the areas of cardiac care, oncology, nephrology, trauma and rehabilitation. (wikipedia.org)
  • year
  • In the same year the Interdepartmental Institute of Anasthesiology and Resuscitation was established ( presently, Department of Anasthesiology and Intensive Care). (wikipedia.org)
  • In a typical year the hospital sees 328,207 outpatients, 61,540 people in the emergency department and admits 22,633 people. (wikipedia.org)
  • During this year he established Barlow Sanatorium to care for others with tuberculosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • That year, Boyd Bigelow, MD, "a maverick with a plane" by Dr. Spencer's account, hired him to admit and manage patients at Denver's St. Anthony's Central Hospital, which had no house staff. (the-hospitalist.org)
  • 126,000 in New Equipment Purchased by Regional Hospital Last Year St. Anthony Regional Hospital spent in excess of $126,000 for equipment in 1975, securing some of the most modern medical diagnostic aids available in the medical field today, according to Administrator Robert D. Blincow. (newspapers.com)
  • There were over 13,000 X-ray procedures done at the hospital during the past year - all the way from a sore toe to kidney examination - using the sophisticated equipment donated by the Hospital Auxiliary. (newspapers.com)
  • In the past year the respiratory therapy department had an increase in the care of obstructive and restrictive lung patients with intermittent positive pressure breathing treatments, ultrasonic treatments, mechanical ventilation, oxygen and aerosal treatments. (newspapers.com)
  • The Hospital Auxiliary, in its 21-year history, has contributed thousands of dollars and logged thousands of hours to benefit hospital and its patients. (newspapers.com)
  • Sixty-one hospital epidemic cases were reviewed, and 30-year follow-up assessed by questionnaire, interview, and physical examination. (iacfsme.org)
  • During his third year, he began his medical residency at the Hospital Policlínico San Martín, a medical center that received the most complicated cases from much of Buenos Aires province. (wikipedia.org)
  • Based on the latest fiscal year (2013-14) statistics, inpatient admissions at the multiple locations totaled more than 33,000, with more than 487,000 hospital outpatient visits. (wikipedia.org)
  • UP providers see about 404,870 patients each year in 170 locations in 38 counties. (wikipedia.org)
  • In that inaugural year, the hospital had 90 employees. (chkd.org)
  • In its first full year serving children, inpatient admissions accounted for 18,109 patient days . (chkd.org)
  • CHKD Foundation also came into being that year , and inpatient admissions accounted or 36,823 patient days , double what they were when the hospital opened. (chkd.org)
  • A 58-year-old woman was admitted to Columbia Hospital in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 12 May 1975, for weakness. (annals.org)
  • A 32-year-old white man with tuberculous bowel perforation was admitted after surgery in the intensive care unit with severe sepsis. (scielo.br)
  • 1896
  • It was built in 1866 and redeveloped in 1896, 1905, 1960-1975 and 2015-2016. (wikipedia.org)
  • Due to eventual overcrowding, the hospital was extended in 1896. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1896, the most commonly-reported causes for insanity at the hospital were epilepsy, intemperance, masturbation, and religious paranoia. (wikipedia.org)
  • After caring for children since 1896 through a visiting nurse program and then a Children's Clinic, The King's Daughters rallied the community and raised the money to build their dream: a hospital devoted specifically to children. (chkd.org)
  • 2002
  • Also, the Nursing Faculty in Katowice-Ligota was established, which awards a master's degree in nursing (in 1990 the faculty was changed into a division of the Katowice Medical Faculty and in 2002 was included in the Faculty of Health Care and Education). (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2002 the Faculty of Public Health and Faculty of Health Care and Education were established and the Faculty of Public Health was founded. (wikipedia.org)
  • In January 2002, Baptist Hospital joined Saint Thomas Health's regional health system and became a member of Ascension Health, a Catholic organization that is the largest not-for-profit health system in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • Memorial Health Center was designated a Critical Access Hospital in 2002. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1996
  • Memorial Hospital of Taylor County (Medford), Good Samaritan Health Center (Merrill), Langlade Memorial Hospital (Antigo) and Wausau Hospital created the Wisconsin Valley Health Network, a not-for-profit health care corporation in June 1996. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Hampshire County Lunatic Asylum, later Knowle Mental Hospital and Knowle Hospital, was a psychiatric hospital in the village of Knowle near the town of Fareham in Hampshire, southern England, opened in 1852 and closed in 1996. (wikipedia.org)
  • Methods and Results- We evaluated a national sample of elderly patients (n=141 680) hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction from 1994 to 1996. (ahajournals.org)
  • outpatient
  • Other institutions on the campus include the Barbara Sinatra Children's Center and the Dolores Hope Outpatient Care Center. (wikipedia.org)
  • An in-hospital pharmacy also opened , and CHKD's 17 specialty outpatient clinics were now treating more than 31,000 children annually. (chkd.org)
  • acute care
  • Originally a tuberculosis sanatorium, Barlow Respiratory Hospital is a long-term acute care facility in Los Angeles that specializes in respiratory diseases and also treats related secondary ailments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Through assessment and intervention, Barlow's team strives to resolve acute medical conditions, allowing patients to move from the acute care setting to another level of care, or home. (wikipedia.org)
  • Memorial Hospital
  • With funds from a Hill-Burton grant and community donations, a new Memorial Hospital of Taylor County (a 50-bed, 10-bassinet hospital) was built in Medford. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ten years later, the Medford Clinic was purchased by Memorial Hospital of Taylor County. (wikipedia.org)
  • In April 1990, Memorial Hospital and Community Health Care, Inc., the parent organization of Wausau Hospital, became affiliated. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ownership and control of Memorial Hospital of Taylor County remained local, and the hospital continued to be a community, not-for-profit entity. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1999, Memorial Hospital of Taylor County changed its name to Memorial Health Center. (wikipedia.org)
  • The original Thomas D. Dee Memorial Hospital at 24th Street and Harrison Boulevard in Ogden opened on December 29, 1910, and closed on July 12, 1969, with its patients transferring to the new David O. McKay Hospital at 3939 Harrison Boulevard. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Thomas D. Dee Memorial Hospital was founded in 1910 by Annie Taylor Dee and her children as a memorial to their husband and father. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Thomas D. Dee Memorial Hospital Association was incorporated February 3, 1910. (wikipedia.org)
  • obstructive
  • Although the induction of acute respiratory failure in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease and CO 2 retention by morphine or barbituates is well-known, few data are available on the use of oral antianxiety drugs in these patients. (annals.org)
  • Accordingly, we studied the consequences of administering diazepam to six patients with severe but stable obstructive lung disease and hypercapnia. (annals.org)
  • physiotherapy
  • ADL = activity of daily living, GLM = generalized linear models, IQR = interquartile range, OA = osteoarthritis, SF-36 = Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, THA = total hip arthroplasty, THAP = total hip arthroplasty protocol, THAPCP = total hip arthroplasty physiotherapy care protocol. (va.gov)
  • Patients who received THA without a rehabilitation program will develop functional limitations within 1 yr after surgery [13- and physiotherapy plays an important role in the care of these patients. (va.gov)
  • clinical
  • It also provide a program of rotation in the best clinical departments of the Medical University of Silesia. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1975 the Clinical Teaching Center was opened in Tychy, and the second Medical Faculty was established in Katowice-Ligota. (wikipedia.org)
  • This report summarizes the findings of the investigations of these incidents, which underscore the need for clinical monitoring for adverse effects in all patients receiving treatment for LTBI. (cdc.gov)
  • Sign up for Insight Alerts highlighting editor-chosen studies with the greatest impact on clinical care. (aappublications.org)
  • The patients were electively admitted to the hospital clinical research center for the study, for which they gave informed consent. (annals.org)
  • In 1966, volunteers launched a program that helped children adjust to being in the hospital, setting the stage for today's clinical child life program , an essential component of patient care at CHKD. (chkd.org)
  • clinic
  • When construction was completed in 2006, the facility had grown by 80 percent - three surgical suites, private patient rooms, rooms designed for chemotherapy services, a new emergency department, and a new two-story clinic were the highlights. (wikipedia.org)
  • He dreaded clinic hours but enjoyed the hospital. (the-hospitalist.org)
  • medical
  • The War Hospital was staffed by both Royal Army Medical Corps and civilian doctors, locally recruited nurses and VADs, as well as some of the original civilian staff. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Medical College Hospital was inaugurated by Shri. (wikipedia.org)
  • The limb center, mental hospital and ophthalmic hospital were brought under Medical College administration. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eighty percent of its patients are from Los Angeles County while the remaining 20% are admitted from national and international medical facilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • As a medical intern in Cambodia, you will have the opportunity to observe medical work in a variety of departments. (projects-abroad.org)
  • Since its reopening, the state hospital has become the largest medical facility in Phnom Penh and admits over 17,000 patients annually. (projects-abroad.org)
  • The Eisenhower Medical Center (EMC) is a not-for-profit hospital based in Rancho Mirage, California serving the Coachella Valley region of southeastern California. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Eisenhower Urgent Care in Rancho Mirage is located on the North West corner of Monterey and Country Club drive, in the Rancho Mirage Medical Center. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eisenhower Urgent Cares always staff medical doctors, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners as the medical providers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Later, Thomas Petty, MD, an eminent pulmonologist who headed a respiratory team at the University of Colorado Medical Center and became chairman of the National Lung Educational Program, introduced the young physician to a team-based approach to hospital care. (the-hospitalist.org)
  • Maurice Ramirez, DO, an emergency physician and federal medical officer with the Department of Homeland Security, suggests the military's command structure may have influenced Dr. Spencer more than he realizes. (the-hospitalist.org)
  • Dr. Bigelow became medical director of Flight for Life, the first civilian airborne emergency medical service, which has flown more than 65,000 patients to critical care facilities. (the-hospitalist.org)
  • The outcomes that were assessed preoperatively and 15 d postoperatively in 106 patients were muscle strength force, goniometry, Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, and Merle d'Aubigné and Postel score. (va.gov)
  • The report recommends a range of guiding principles for medical treatment, including ensuring patient autonomy in decision-making, ensuring non-discrimination, accountability and access to remedies. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first medical superintendent was Dr Ferguson and the partially completed asylum received twenty patients in December 1852, admitted from the workhouse in Fareham. (wikipedia.org)
  • By the 1830s, however, the hospital was riddled with problems such as a failing infrastructure and a shortage of staff- the medical establishment had consisted of just one assistant surgeon and physician, and a few medical subordinates. (wikipedia.org)
  • More significantly, the hospital was distinguished from its predecessors by its emphasis on provision of medical care for locals (it had served mainly seafarers, the Europeans and the military in preceding decades). (wikipedia.org)
  • Specialization of medical services was also not feasible due to the small medical establishment and high doctor-to-patient ratios. (wikipedia.org)
  • Over the ensuing sixteen years he chaired the medical malpractice department of the firm, which by 1994 was known as Sullivan and Liapakis, P.C. In those sixteen years the medical malpractice department grew to a ten attorney department. (danknermilstein.com)
  • Residents are entitled to subsidised treatment from medical practitioners, eligible midwives, nurse practitioners and allied health professionals who have been issued a Medicare provider number, and can also obtain free treatment in public hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medicare benefits are payable for medical treatment provided to admitted patients of private hospitals as well as public hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 164-acre campus also includes University Hospital, Wiser Hospital for Women and Infants, Conerly Critical Care Hospital, Batson Children's Hospital, the state's only children's hospital, and Rowland Medical Library. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mission of the University of Mississippi Medical Center is to improve the health and well-being of patients and the community through excellent training for health-care professionals, engagement in innovative medical research, and the delivery of state-of-the-art health care. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinics
  • A collaborative effort among its family of hospitals and other clinics and health care facilities throughout Middle Tennessee and Southern Kentucky, Saint Thomas Heart provides complete cardiac services from more than 20 locations. (wikipedia.org)
  • surgical
  • He first worked as a resident and later as a member of the surgical team, working with Donald B. Effler, head of cardiovascular surgery, F. Mason Sones, Jr., who was in charge of the Angiography Laboratory and William L. Proudfit, head of the Department of Cardiology. (wikipedia.org)
  • He stayed in the hospital for three months due to surgical wound infection, blood stream infection, pneumonia and catheter associated fungemia by Candida albicans which was treated with endovenous fluconazol. (scielo.br)
  • A surgical debridement of abscess was realized and the patient was discharged after 14 days of fluconazol therapy without other lesions. (scielo.br)
  • respiratory
  • The Barlow Respiratory Hospital is a hospital located in the Elysian Park neighborhood of Echo Park, near Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California. (wikipedia.org)
  • Through these programs, it is able to care for conditions that are often associated with respiratory diseases, thus promoting a holistic model of treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Barlow's TIPS Ventilator Weaning Protocol / Ventilator Weaning: Barlow Respiratory Hospital is recognized for a ventilator weaning success rate of nearly 60%, among the highest rate in the nation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients are guided through a step-by-step method, implemented and monitored by respiratory care practitioners, to recover independent breathing. (wikipedia.org)
  • health
  • Saint Thomas Midtown Hospital is operated by Saint Thomas Health, which also operates Saint Thomas West Hospital and Saint Thomas Hospital for Specialty Surgery in Nashville, Saint Thomas - Rutherford Hospital in Murfreesboro, Saint Thomas Hickman Hospital in Centerville, Saint Thomas River Park Hospital in McMinnville, Saint Thomas Dekalb Hospital in Smithville, Saint Thomas Stones River Hospital in Woodbury, and Saint Thomas Highlands Hospital in Sparta. (wikipedia.org)
  • A faith-based hospital, Saint Thomas Midtown encourages spiritual healing in addition to physical health. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is financed and administrated by Health and Family welfare Department, Government of Kerala. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aspirus Medford Hospital (formerly Memorial Health Center) is a not-for-profit, primary care health care organization in Taylor and Price Counties in north-central Wisconsin, United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • As a licensed Critical Access Hospital, Memorial Health Center receives cost-based reimbursement for treating Medicare and Medicaid patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Barlow team of health care professional helps patients previously unable to be liberated or "weaned" from the ventilator at other hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • A 1975 outbreak, characterized by severe venous involvement, affected nurses and staff of a California community hospital spreading to other health care workers and unrelated persons. (iacfsme.org)
  • She was instructed to contact her health-care provider about adverse effects during treatment. (cdc.gov)
  • On the 49th and last day of treatment, she returned to her health-care provider and was admitted to a hospital because of jaundice and altered mental status. (cdc.gov)
  • They trained and educated the general public, teachers, and nurses and improved health-care delivery. (wikipedia.org)
  • The figures on unnecessary events represent people who are thrust into a dangerous health care system. (whale.to)
  • Medicare is a publicly funded universal health care system in Australia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Operated by the Department of Human Services, Medicare is the primary funder of health care in Australia, funding primary health care for Australian citizens and permanent residents including Norfolk Island. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hawke reintroduced universal health care in 1984 as Medicare. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1972, 17% of Australians outside of Queensland (which had a free public health care system) were uninsured, most of whom were on low incomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • 5 - 7 Despite this, unfavorable social and environmental problems associated with parental drug use 8 , 9 make long-term health and social surveillance of these infants and families difficult to track after discharge from the hospital of birth. (aappublications.org)
  • Admission preference is given to Mississippi residents in an effort to supply professionals to meet the state's health-care needs. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1984, CHKD's forward-thinking leadership established Children's Health System as the region's only pediatric health-care system. (chkd.org)
  • A huge leap in health care for Hampton Roads children occurred in 1985. (chkd.org)
  • McKay-Dee Hospital is a not-for-profit community focused health system operated by Intermountain Healthcare . (wikipedia.org)
  • 1917
  • from 1917, Park Prewett Hospital in Basingstoke took over responsibilities for the northern half of the county. (wikipedia.org)
  • critically ill
  • In 1975, CHKD established its signature pediatric transport program and began bringing critically ill children from other area hospitals to the pediatric experts at CHKD. (chkd.org)
  • inpatient
  • The facility's new Walter and Leonore Annenberg Pavilion, an inpatient pavilion connected to the north end of the existing hospital, opened in late 2010. (wikipedia.org)
  • For this rating section three different types of data from HealthGrades are presented: quality ratings for thirty-two inpatient conditions and procedures, thirteen patient safety indicators, percentage of patients giving the hospital a 9 or 10 (the two highest possible ratings). (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • The hospitals of Saint Thomas Heart also received five-star ratings for the treatment of heart failure and atrial fibrillation, coronary interventional procedures and coronary services. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aspirus Medford Hospital is a Critical Access Hospital with a Level III Trauma Center with access to Level II trauma treatment and a newborn intensive care unit. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hospital has four primary treatment programs. (wikipedia.org)
  • In January 2006 President Gerald Ford was admitted to EMC for sixteen days for treatment of pneumonia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Jacksonville phased out its in-patient treatment of mental illness and its name was changed one last time to reflect its new mission. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Simeon Josephi was appointed superintendent of the hospital from its opening until May 1887, and strived to base his treatment methods on those used by Dr. Hawthorne. (wikipedia.org)
  • In some patients, skin lesions may be the only sign of a systemic fungal infection, and prompt recognition of these lesions may facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. (scielo.br)
  • community
  • Saint Thomas Midtown Hospital, formerly known as Baptist Hospital, is a not-for-profit community hospital in Nashville, Tennessee, United States and the largest such hospital in Middle Tennessee. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also in 2008, Thomson/Reuters named Saint Thomas Heart to its list of top 100 cardiovascular community hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • An infectious epidemic outbreak, characterized by acute onset of severe influenza-like symptoms and accompanied by severe venous involvement, occurred in 1975 in a community hospital in Carmichael, a suburb of Sacramento, CA. Vascular features ranged from spontaneous bruising with numbness, tingling, and burning to painfully swollen veins. (iacfsme.org)
  • Both male and female patients were admitted, and were expected to work on the farm, in the kitchens and in other trades to help support their community. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stratheden Hospital is currently a small community hospital in Cupar, Fife which was originally called Fife and Kinross District Asylum. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1979, thanks to unprecedented community support, the hospital opened its much-needed addition of two floors. (chkd.org)
  • severe
  • The hallmark symptom of painful veins appeared to be similar but more severe and extensive than the Epidemic Phlebodynia documented in three other hospital epidemics reported in 1953, 1957, and 1965 (1-3). (iacfsme.org)
  • The epidemic spread to all departments of the Hospital, and the outbreak was equally severe. (iacfsme.org)
  • During the Japanese Occupation, the hospital faced severe water shortages after its water supply was cut. (wikipedia.org)
  • NICU
  • UMMC has the only hospital in the state designated as a Level 1 trauma center, and the state's only Level 4 neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) located in the Wiser Hospital for Women and Infants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Today thanks to continual advancements, the NICU now routinely cares for babies born as much as three-and-a-half to four months early. (chkd.org)
  • Now CHKD had two dedicated intensive-care units: the NICU for newborns and the PICU for all other children. (chkd.org)
  • nurses
  • It is sometimes possible to arrange extra hours from 2pm to 5pm to help the nurses or do additional work with patients. (projects-abroad.org)
  • It first affected Intensive Care Unit nurses and staff and spread to other healthcare workers, their families and unrelated persons. (iacfsme.org)
  • Nurses' work day was 12 hours with 1/2-day off per week when the patient load permitted. (wikipedia.org)
  • state
  • Medicine interns in Cambodia work in Phnom Penh in a large state hospital. (projects-abroad.org)
  • The state hospital originally opened in 1960. (projects-abroad.org)
  • A $212.5 million, four story, state-of-the-art addition to the hospital, the Walter and Leonore Annenberg Pavilion, opened for patient care on November 2, 2010. (wikipedia.org)
  • The purpose of this report is to delineate the hallmark symptoms of the outbreak and determine the functional state of affected patients 30 years later. (iacfsme.org)
  • After the initial flu state, patients had a constant plateau of illness punctuated by unpredictable relapses, often worse than the initial illness. (iacfsme.org)
  • Dorothea Dix lobbied the state legislature to create a facility in Illinois designed for the care of the mentally ill. (wikipedia.org)
  • On March 1, 1847, the legislature established the Illinois State Asylum and Hospital for the Insane with a nine-member board of trustees that was empowered to appoint a superintendent, purchase land within four miles of Jacksonville, and construct facilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hospital was created to shift the economic burden of the mentally ill onto the state, which paid all of the patients' expenses. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the Board of State Commissioners of Public Charities was abolished in 1909, the institute was reorganized and renamed Jacksonville State Hospital effective January 1, 1910. (wikipedia.org)
  • Originally named the Oregon Hospital for the Insane, the Oregon State Hospital was active in the fields of electroconvulsive therapy, lobotomies, eugenics, and hydrotherapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2007, the state of Oregon approved a $458 million plan to rebuild the main hospital to a downsized 620-bed facility, which was completed in 2013. (wikipedia.org)
  • Oregon State Hospital is located in what is referred to as the Oregon State Hospital Historic District, and was registered with the National Register for Historic Places in 2008. (wikipedia.org)
  • Activist Dorothea Dix was an advocate of Hawthorne's original hospital, which she had visited twice, and was a vocal critic of the opening of the new state hospital, believing the state was ill-prepared to care for patients adequately. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Oregon constitution mandated that state hospitals be built in the capital city of Salem. (wikipedia.org)
  • The newly-built, state-funded hospital opened as the Oregon State Insane Asylum on October 23, 1883, and was constructed based on the Kirkbride Plan for a total of $184,000 (equivalent to $4,832,629 in 2017). (wikipedia.org)
  • The tunnels connect different buildings of the State Hospital together. (wikipedia.org)
  • The State Capitol and associated buildings also have a tunnel system to this day (parts of which are publicly accessible) but they have never been connected to the State Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • The operation of public hospitals remains within the authority of state and territory governments. (wikipedia.org)
  • UMMC is the only hospital in the state designated as a Level 1 trauma center. (wikipedia.org)
  • A portion of land on the UMMC campus was once the site of the Mississippi Insane Asylum, which moved its operations in 1935 and became Mississippi State Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • asylum
  • The 5th NGH was based at the former Leicestershire & Rutland County Asylum (now the University of Leicester), but eventually extended to over 60 sites in Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, including local and cottage hospitals, as well as private homes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Hampshire County Lunatic Asylum was built to the designs of James Harris, architect, and some of the construction of the hospital was undertaken by Russian prisoners from the Crimean War. (wikipedia.org)
  • Six other patients were admitted from Grove Place, a private asylum in the nearby village of Nursling. (wikipedia.org)
  • Over 5,500 former patients of the asylum are buried in Knowle Cemetery. (wikipedia.org)
  • At the time, Illinois law (which was enacted when the hospital opened) had an exception to its commitment hearing requirement to allow husbands to confine their wives to an asylum without any hearing. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the hospital was opened on 1 July 1866, it was known as the Fife and Kinross District Asylum. (wikipedia.org)
  • The street in Salem on which the current hospital is located, Center Street, was also originally named Asylum Avenue. (wikipedia.org)
  • adequately
  • This relative lack of guidance concerning the risk stratification and management of AMI patients with elevated glucose may reflect the fact that many aspects of the relationship between glucose levels and mortality in AMI patients have not been adequately defined. (ahajournals.org)
  • citation
  • citation needed] Bearing that in mind he founded the Fundación Favaloro in 1975 along with other collaborators. (wikipedia.org)
  • findings
  • 1-20 On the basis of these reports and similar findings in patients with critical illness, 21 the association between glucose levels and adverse outcomes has been a focus of growing attention from expert groups and professional societies. (ahajournals.org)
  • 1969
  • During his 1968-1969 internship at the University of Colorado under Dr. Petty, Dr. Spencer found he enjoyed working on a hospital team and the discipline of the hospital hierarchy. (the-hospitalist.org)
  • symptoms
  • Outcome of neuropsychiatric symptoms and daily functioning of patients with dementia treated on an acute psychogeriatric ward. (annals.org)
  • This report describes a patient who, 1 month after beginning therapy for rheumatoid arthritis, manifested signs and symptoms of polymyositis associated with myocarditis, proteinuria, and hypocomplementemia. (annals.org)
  • The patient had no other symptoms or signs. (scielo.br)
  • facility
  • Only private pay residents were admitted to the facility prior to its becoming Medicare certified in 1998. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the mid-twentieth century, the facility experienced significant overcrowding problems, with a peak of nearly 3,600 patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • The King's Daughters and hospital administrator William Selvey soon led the facility to its first major milestone: its 1962 accreditation by the Joint Commission . (chkd.org)
  • wings
  • Completed in September 1968, was the addition of a second floor to the north, south, and west wings of the hospital, increasing its bed count by 60. (wikipedia.org)
  • the growing influx of patients led to two additional wings being added onto the hospital, followed by a conversion from gas to electric lighting. (wikipedia.org)
  • citizens
  • Illinois originally did not have any system for caring for its mentally ill citizens who were either living with their family or kept in local almshouses. (wikipedia.org)
  • acute
  • This article reviews the performance of bedside lung ultrasound for diagnosing pleural effusion, pneumothorax, alveolar-interstitial syndrome, lung consolidation, pulmonary abscess and lung recruitment/derecruitment in critically ill patients with acute lung injury. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In the ICU, bedside chest radiography is routinely performed on a daily basis and is considered as a reference for assessing lung status in critically ill patients with acute lung injury. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The symptoms that are presented by bipolar patients in an acute manic or depressive phase can be overwhelming because they may range from florid psychotic mania with grandiose delusions to depression with mutism and catatonic features. (docplayer.net)
  • These data arise from a study reported in Kelsey and Hardy (1975) which was designed to investi-gate whether driving a car is a risk factor for low back pain resulting from acute herniated lumbarintervertebral discs (AHLID). (onlinepdfcatalog.com)
  • 1895
  • Incorporated as Beth Israel Hospital on May 28, 1890 and opened at 206 Broadway in 1891, moved to Jefferson and Cherry Streets in 1895, moved to Stuyvesant Square. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clinical
  • In addition, these clinical symptoms are often part of an impressive life story, especially in elderly patients. (docplayer.net)
  • This goal is achieved reliability, reproducibility, clinical applicability, clinical flex- for many patients receiving chemotherapy or radiation ibility, clarity, multidisciplinary process, review of evidence, therapy, and is based on clinical and basic research that has and documentation.4 steadily improved the control of emesis over the last 20 In formulating recommendations for antiemetic usage, years. (marysfamilymedicine.org)
  • not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to As antiemetic usage has grown, the classes of agents available particular patients or special clinical situations. (marysfamilymedicine.org)
  • Additionally, managing special and difficult emetic regarding emesis in cancer care have been addressed by problems and selecting the proper antiemetic approach necessi- clinical trials. (marysfamilymedicine.org)
  • As ongoing research is completed, several aspects of clinical care. (marysfamilymedicine.org)
  • appreciates these issues and their applicability to the manage- to interventions performed in the context of clinical ment of patients with cancer. (marysfamilymedicine.org)
  • The Medical Corps (MC) of the U.S. Army is a staff corps (non-combat specialty branch) of the U.S. Army Medical Department (AMEDD) consisting of commissioned medical officers - physicians with either an M.D. or a D.O. degree, at least one year of post-graduate clinical training, and a state medical license. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1999
  • In 1999, the hospital was purchased by Mount Sinai and had its name changed again, this time to Mount Sinai Queens, becoming the first community hospital to bear the Mount Sinai name. (wikipedia.org)
  • Insane
  • On March 1, 1847, the legislature established the Illinois State Asylum and Hospital for the Insane with a nine-member board of trustees that was empowered to appoint a superintendent, purchase land within four miles of Jacksonville, and construct facilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Jacksonville remained Illinois' only such hospital until two additional facilities, the hospital at Elgin and the hospital at Anna, were authorized in 1869, and the legislature renamed Jacksonville as the Illinois Central Hospital for the Insane, assumed primary responsibility for patients from the counties of central Illinois. (wikipedia.org)
  • Moved to the site of the former New York City Asylum for the Insane on Blackwell's Island (later known as Welfare Island and currently Roosevelt Island) in 1894, renamed Metropolitan Hospital, moved to its current location in 1955, renamed Metropolitan Hospital Center in 1965. (wikipedia.org)
  • A portion of land on the UMMC campus was once the site of the Mississippi Insane Asylum, which moved its operations in 1935 and became Mississippi State Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • Royal Army
  • The War Hospital was staffed by both Royal Army Medical Corps and civilian doctors, locally recruited nurses and VADs, as well as some of the original civilian staff. (wikipedia.org)
  • The laboratory was completed in 1914 but due to the advent of the war occupation of the building by LTSM was deferred and it was used as a Tropical Diseases Hospital offering courses to officers of the Royal Army Medical Corps. (wikipedia.org)
  • Asylum
  • The 5th NGH was based at the former Leicestershire & Rutland County Asylum (now the University of Leicester), but eventually extended to over 60 sites in Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, including local and cottage hospitals, as well as private homes. (wikipedia.org)
  • At the time, Illinois law (which was enacted when the hospital opened) had an exception to its commitment hearing requirement to allow husbands to confine their wives to an asylum without any hearing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Founded as the Homeopathic Hospital affiliated with the New York Homeopathic Medical College (now New York Medical College) in 1875, in a building originally built for the Inebriate Asylum on Ward's Island. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2017
  • The fourth most selective medical school in the United States, Alpert Medical School earned rankings of twenty-first for primary care education and thirty-first for research in the 2017 U.S. News & World Report rankings. (wikipedia.org)
  • Brown Alpert Medical School is one of seven Ivy League medical schools and is currently ranked 21st for primary care education and 31st for research by the 2017 U.S. News and World Report rankings. (wikipedia.org)
  • In May 2017, Mara Lee writing for Modern Healthcare reported in an article titled "Mount Sinai asked to return $41.9 million in Medicare overpayments" that issues of improper billing were being attributed to Mount Sinai by government health care officials. (wikipedia.org)
  • patient's
  • The plaintiff is/ was the patient, or a legally designated party acting on behalf of the patient, or - in the case of a wrongful death suit - the executor or administrator of a deceased patient's estate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, when a patient claims injury as the result of a medical professional's care, a malpractice case will most often be based upon one of three theories: Failure to diagnose: a medical professional is alleged to have failed to diagnose an existing medical condition, or to have provided an incorrect diagnoses for the patient's medical condition. (wikipedia.org)
  • accordance
  • Michael's relatives were assured that the determination of "brain death" was done in accordance with the hospital policy of certification of death by neurological criteria, which is patterned after, and consistent with, the New York State Department of Health and New York State Task Force on Life & the Law, "Guidelines for Determining Brain Death," published November 2011. (christorchaos.com)
  • therapeutic
  • Management of critically ill patients requires imaging techniques, which are essential for optimizing diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Lung CT is now considered as the gold standard not only for the diagnosis of pneumothorax, pleural effusion, lung consolidation, atelectasis and alveolar-interstitial syndrome but also for guiding therapeutic procedures in critically ill patients, such as trans-thoracic drainage of localized pneumo-thorax, empyema or lung abscess. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The art of Chinese preventative medicine has gradually been replaced by the growing production and commercialisation of chemical therapeutic products that have, along the way, turned the patient into a simple consumer of medical merchandise, abandoning body and soul into the hands of the practitioner. (altheal.org)
  • With regard to this, it is notable that the Department of Health has recently taken the decision to withdraw from the sector the reimbursement for 250 pharmaceutical specialities of which the therapeutic and healing virtues were no longer recognised. (altheal.org)
  • students
  • The medical school was restarted in 1972 as the Program in Medicine and the first M.D. degrees of the modern era were awarded to a graduating class of 58 students in 1975. (wikipedia.org)
  • center
  • To reflect this change in mission, the legislature renamed it the Jacksonville Mental Health and Developmental Center' in 1975. (wikipedia.org)
  • When closed, the Jacksonville Developmental Center treated primarily developmentally delayed patients, some of whom also had mental illnesses. (wikipedia.org)
  • The center was operated by the Illinois Department of Human Services. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bellevue Hospital Center, First Avenue and East 26th Street, Manhattan. (wikipedia.org)
  • Harlem Hospital Center, 506 Lenox Avenue, Manhattan. (wikipedia.org)
  • Opened as Harlem Hospital on April 18, 1887 at East 120th Street and the East River, moved to Lenox Avenue on April 13, 1907, renamed Harlem Hospital Center. (wikipedia.org)
  • Metropolitan Hospital Center, 1901 1st Avenue, Manhattan. (wikipedia.org)
  • The school and the hospital together formed the Mount Sinai Health Center. (wikipedia.org)
  • In January 1997, Continuum Health Partners, Inc. was formed as a partnership of the Beth Israel Medical Center and St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center. (wikipedia.org)
  • Beth Israel Medical Center Milton Division Carroll Petrie Division Kings Highway Division (later renamed Beth Israel Brooklyn) St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center St. Luke's Hospital Roosevelt Hospital The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, located on Second Avenue and 14th Street in Manhattan joined Continuum in 2000. (wikipedia.org)
  • UMMC is the only hospital in the state designated as a Level 1 trauma center. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mission of the University of Mississippi Medical Center is to improve the health and well-being of patients and the community through excellent training for health-care professionals, engagement in innovative medical research, and the delivery of state-of-the-art health care. (wikipedia.org)
  • UMMC has the only hospital in the state designated as a Level 1 trauma center, and the state's only Level 4 neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) located in the Wiser Hospital for Women and Infants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vancouver
  • Department of The University of British Columbia Vancouver, Canada Date 18th August 1363 DE-6 (2/88) ABSTRACT The subject of this thesis is criminal justice sentencing policy. (ubc.ca)
  • among
  • However, despite improvements, a significant It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always number of patients still experience emesis, and efforts to account for individual variation among patients. (marysfamilymedicine.org)
  • Another study notes that about 1.14 million patient-safety incidents occurred among the 37 million hospitalizations in the Medicare population over the years 2000-2002. (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • Goals related to the complete helpful results from these trials will be incorporated into control of emesis, ie, no vomiting, include providing care updates of these guidelines. (marysfamilymedicine.org)
  • tendency
  • Medicine has a tendency to become a 'business' where the patient is reduced to the level of nothing more than a client. (altheal.org)
  • Parkinson
  • It was concluded that there were no indications of the slowness or motor disturbances seen in subcortical illnesses such as Parkinson s disease, but that this patient showed the mild cognitive impairments that are commonly found in patients with bipolar disorder. (docplayer.net)
  • study
  • This is a new field of research, and those who study and treat patients with bipolar disorder have only gradually learned to understand the deficits that result from cognitive impairment, even when the patient seems to be doing well in terms of mood symptoms. (docplayer.net)
  • Furthermore, the study found that the most common result of this negligence was death of the patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • lung
  • As a matter of fact, chest ultrasound can be used easily at the bedside to assess initial lung morphology in severely hypoxemic patients [ 2 ] and can be easily repeated, allowing the effects of therapy to be monitored. (biomedcentral.com)
  • You know he stated to me that he never had any pain associated with his lung cancer, and even drove himself to Veterans hospital a couple of weeks prior. (mynursingedu.com)
  • officers
  • World War I brought a realization of the need to provide more than the "finishing school" approach of the AMS to military medical education and indoctrination and in 1920, the Medical Department first established hospital internships as a method of acquiring new officers for the MC. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1946, Army residency programs for MC officers were introduced into the Medical Department, providing for the first time the full spectrum of graduate medical education (GME) to prospective MC officers. (wikipedia.org)
  • found
  • Using a small sample of patients, with greater than 20% burn damage, they found that, wounds healed without typical severity of complication, had an increased adaptation to skin grafting and stayed a little shorter than most in an ICU with zinc supplementation. (jaanc.org)
  • In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the quality of medical care at CMF was found to be lacking, as evidenced by the following: After an investigation, the U.S. Justice Department sent a January 1987 letter to then-Governor George Deukmejian stating that CMF "deprive[s] inmates of their right to be free from deliberate indifference to their serious medical needs. (wikipedia.org)
  • time
  • Similarly, a doctor who has treated a patient with bipolar disorder for a long time may wonder whether the patient is suffering from dementia when he reaches a certain age. (docplayer.net)
  • At the time, Mount Sinai officials admitted to partial misconduct and offered to cover limited billing claims retro-actively. (wikipedia.org)
  • death
  • Prosecutors agreed to spare him from the death penalty if he identified patients who had been given lethal drug overdoses. (crimezzz.net)
  • Importantly, the risk of death for patients who have a hip fracture is substantially increased in the first 6 months postfracture and persists for the following 6 years independent of other comorbidities . (va.gov)
  • people
  • Back in 1984, the extrapolated statistics from relatively few records in only several states of the United States estimated that between 44,000-98,000 people annually die in hospitals because of medical errors. (wikipedia.org)
  • With the trend towards deinstitutionalization, this situation is becoming increasingly frequent, and hospital admission is restricted to people with severe mental illnesses. (wikipedia.org)
  • years
  • In addition to this, after having waited more than twenty years, it is difficult to understand the government's lack of haste in 'de-reimbursing' these same 250 medical products, in the interest of the public, even when it would be a question of saving millions for the social security department. (altheal.org)
  • After three years, she was discharge from the hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • Years later, a successful stint as President and CEO of the then-struggling Salt Lake Organizing Committee for the 2002 Winter Olympics led to a relaunch of his political career.Elected Governor of Massachusetts in 2002, Romney helped develop and then signed into law the Massachusetts health care reform legislation, the first of its kind in the nation. (wikipedia.org)
  • gradually
  • On 7 May 1919 the hospital was deemed surplus to military requirements and was gradually closed down, being handed back to the custody of the Board of Guardians on 8 August, having treated 20,456 wounded servicemen. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical care
  • A 1988 lawsuit charged that CMF was "a filthy, vermin-infested, overcrowded prison," and that medical care there was "grossly inadequate. (wikipedia.org)
  • work
  • He qualified as a doctor in 1962 and began work at St Thomas's Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • Following the work of Henry Dale and George Barger at Burroughs-Wellcome, academic chemist Gordon Alles synthesized amphetamine and tested it in asthma patients in 1929. (wikipedia.org)