• 1980
  • It was forced to close for five years during the Pol Pot regime from 1975 to 1980 and sadly, during this time, many doctors and educated medical professionals were killed. (projects-abroad.org)
  • In 1980 Favaloro established the 'Basic Investigation Laboratory' (Laboratorio de Investigación Básica), which was long financed with his own money and which, at the time, depended upon the support of the Research and Teaching Department of the Fundación Favaloro. (wikipedia.org)
  • International Journal of Family Psychiatry, 1, 357-372, 1980 Letter from Dr. Haldane in response to Dr. Roger Kennedy on the subject of Families in an In-patient setting, alluding to the Cassel Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1900
  • David Marshall Williams (November 13, 1900 - January 8, 1975) was a convicted murderer and was the American firearms designer of the floating chamber and the short-stroke piston. (wikipedia.org)
  • By 1856, the asylum had expanded to take 400 patients, and growth continued throughout the century - with over 1,000 patients in the asylum by 1900. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1900, the hospital began to expand its campus, with two additional women's wards and four men's being added to the main building. (wikipedia.org)
  • wards
  • During the Second World War it had wards for both military and civilian patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 253-bed super specialty block, spread over 160,000 sq ft (15,000 m2) houses the outpatient clinics and inpatient wards of the six super specialties, eight operation theatres, 29-bed six intensive care units, haemo dialysis unit and renal transplant unit, apart from administrative blocks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although the main hospital building was completed by December, 1966, commissioning of the Hospital and opening of the wards proceeded slowly mainly because of a shortage of nursing staff. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first patients were admitted in March 1967 and before the end of the year several wards had been opened together with the Polyclinic and Accident and Emergency Unit thus making available to the residents of Petaling Jaya and the adjoining area of Petaling Jaya and the adjoining area of Kuala Lumpur a hospital service on a 24-hour basis. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was heralded as a landmark in Singapore's medical history for igniting the systematic development of hospital services: the hospital was furnished with 800 beds and comprised three separate blocks accommodating male and female wards. (wikipedia.org)
  • doctors had to travel long distances to various wards scattered throughout the hospital to treat patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] At its height Colney Hatch was home to 2,500 mental patients and had the longest corridor in Britain (It would take a visitor more than two hours to walk the wards). (wikipedia.org)
  • During the Second World War twelve wards were requisitioned for use by the Emergency Medical Service (EMS) to be run by St Bartholomew's Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • The wards were used to accommodate 900 civilian war casualties and the displaced mental patients were redistributed around other wards and to Bexley Hospital in Kent. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients were able to earn up to 16/- (80p) 'pocket money' per week to spend in the café and hospital shop by working on the wards, kitchen and laundry. (wikipedia.org)
  • centre
  • Leicester General Hospital (LGH) is a National Health Service hospital located in the suburb of Evington, about three miles east of Leicester City Centre, and is a part of University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Medical College campus houses several hospitals and institutions, other than the Medical College Hospital (MCH), including the College of Nursing, College of Pharmaceutical sciences, Regional Cancer Centre, Thiruvananthapuram Dental College, Sree Chitra Thirunal Institute of Medical Sciences and Technology, Priyadarshini Institute of Paramedical Sciences and Sree Avittom Thirunal Hospital for Women and Children (SAT Hospital). (wikipedia.org)
  • The cancer block was inaugurated in 1958 and after two decades, the Regional Cancer Centre, one of the premier cancer care center catering the needs of South India was established. (wikipedia.org)
  • In October 2012, the new one-site hospital was renamed "Health Sciences North" as it evolved into an academic research centre, as well as a hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • University of Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC) formerly known as University Hospital is a government-funded medical institution located in Pantai Dalam, southwest corner of Kuala Lumpur, the dynamic and bustling capital city of Malaysia. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1896
  • It was built in 1866 and redeveloped in 1896, 1905, 1960-1975 and 2015-2016. (wikipedia.org)
  • Due to eventual overcrowding, the hospital was extended in 1896. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1896, the most commonly-reported causes for insanity at the hospital were epilepsy, intemperance, masturbation, and religious paranoia. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1896, a temporary building of wood and corrugated iron was erected to house 320 chronic and infirm female patients in five dormitories, despite warnings from the Commissioners in Lunacy that this would pose a serious fire risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • After caring for children since 1896 through a visiting nurse program and then a Children's Clinic, The King's Daughters rallied the community and raised the money to build their dream: a hospital devoted specifically to children. (chkd.org)
  • 1961
  • Since The King's Daughters established the hospital in 1961, CHKD has undergone two major renovations and expansions and is now at the heart of a comprehensive system of caring dedicated exclusively to children. (chkd.org)
  • On April 23, 1961, these determined women were thrilled to dedicate Children's Hospital of The King's Daughters , a three-story, 88-bed hospital, where every child would be treated equally, regardless of their financial circumstances. (chkd.org)
  • On May 5, 1961, the first children were admitted to CHKD. (chkd.org)
  • outpatient
  • Other institutions on the campus include the Barbara Sinatra Children's Center and the Dolores Hope Outpatient Care Center. (wikipedia.org)
  • Based on the latest fiscal year (2013-14) statistics, inpatient admissions at the multiple locations totaled more than 33,000, with more than 487,000 hospital outpatient visits. (wikipedia.org)
  • An in-hospital pharmacy also opened , and CHKD's 17 specialty outpatient clinics were now treating more than 31,000 children annually. (chkd.org)
  • surgical
  • At the time of its closure, Saugus General Hospital was a 109-bed facility with surgical facilities, x-ray rooms, a laboratory, a pharmacy, and a cafeteria located in two interconnected buildings. (wikipedia.org)
  • Saugus General Hospital was founded in 1946 as a 26-bed surgical center. (wikipedia.org)
  • When construction was completed in 2006, the facility had grown by 80 percent - three surgical suites, private patient rooms, rooms designed for chemotherapy services, a new emergency department, and a new two-story clinic were the highlights. (wikipedia.org)
  • He first worked as a resident and later as a member of the surgical team, working with Donald B. Effler, head of cardiovascular surgery, F. Mason Sones, Jr., who was in charge of the Angiography Laboratory and William L. Proudfit, head of the Department of Cardiology. (wikipedia.org)
  • He stayed in the hospital for three months due to surgical wound infection, blood stream infection, pneumonia and catheter associated fungemia by Candida albicans which was treated with endovenous fluconazol. (scielo.br)
  • A surgical debridement of abscess was realized and the patient was discharged after 14 days of fluconazol therapy without other lesions. (scielo.br)
  • acute care
  • Originally a tuberculosis sanatorium, Barlow Respiratory Hospital is a long-term acute care facility in Los Angeles that specializes in respiratory diseases and also treats related secondary ailments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Through assessment and intervention, Barlow's team strives to resolve acute medical conditions, allowing patients to move from the acute care setting to another level of care, or home. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1976
  • In 1976, the Public Health Department reported over 100 deficiencies following an inspection of the hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hospital has been featured in popular culture, used as the primary filming location for the 1975 film One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, as well as being the subject of a series of photographs by photographer Mary Ellen Mark in 1976. (wikipedia.org)
  • The plan was introduced in 1975 by the Whitlam Government as Medibank, and was limited to paying customers only in 1976 by the Fraser Government. (wikipedia.org)
  • Psychiatry
  • During the 1970s, plans were drawn up to close the large county mental asylums and in 1979 mental health services for Southampton and south west Hampshire departed to a newly established Department of Psychiatry at Royal South Hants Hospital in Southampton. (wikipedia.org)
  • He had the novel idea of calling his department "Child and Family Psychiatry", a name that was to catch on elsewhere. (wikipedia.org)
  • General Hospital
  • Under the command of Captain W. M. Holmes, RAMC, it become the North Evington War Hospital, part of the 5th Northern General Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1930 the hospital was again renamed becoming the City General Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • History of the Fifth Northern General Hospital Leicester. (wikipedia.org)
  • Saugus General Hospital (previously known as Wendell Hospital) was a hospital located in Saugus, Massachusetts. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the Saugus youth who admitted to starting the other five fires denied starting the blaze at Saugus General Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Re Saugus General Hospital, Inc". Leagle. (wikipedia.org)
  • The origins of Singapore General Hospital can be traced back to a wooded shed erected in the cantonment for British troops located near the Singapore River in 1821, shortly after Sir Stamford Raffles' landing in Singapore. (wikipedia.org)
  • The urgent need for medical care among European soldiers, the seafaring population and natives prompted the building of the first General Hospital at the same site. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hospital was relocated in the following year- a second General Hospital was built in the vicinity of the European soldiers' barracks in the cantonment. (wikipedia.org)
  • The need for better hospital facilities propelled the proposal for the building of a fourth General Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • Following initial opposition from authorities, construction of the fourth General Hospital finally commenced in 1843 at Pearl's Hill. (wikipedia.org)
  • Construction of a fifth General Hospital was subsequently designated at the Kandang Kerbau district and commenced in the same year. (wikipedia.org)
  • Subsequently, the sixth General Hospital was constructed at Sepoy Lines along Outram Road and was opened in 1882. (wikipedia.org)
  • At the turn of the 20th century, overcrowding prompted the construction of a bigger General Hospital at the same site. (wikipedia.org)
  • This seventh General Hospital was officially named Singapore General Hospital and was opened on 29 March 1926 by Sir Lawrence Nunns Guillemard (the then Governor of the Straits Settlements). (wikipedia.org)
  • clinics
  • A collaborative effort among its family of hospitals and other clinics and health care facilities throughout Middle Tennessee and Southern Kentucky, Saint Thomas Heart provides complete cardiac services from more than 20 locations. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2001
  • The study performed by Glader et al on sex differences in Swedish stroke care used data from 2001. (ahajournals.org)
  • treatment
  • The hospitals of Saint Thomas Heart also received five-star ratings for the treatment of heart failure and atrial fibrillation, coronary interventional procedures and coronary services. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aspirus Medford Hospital is a Critical Access Hospital with a Level III Trauma Center with access to Level II trauma treatment and a newborn intensive care unit. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hospital has four primary treatment programs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Through these programs, it is able to care for conditions that are often associated with respiratory diseases, thus promoting a holistic model of treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • In January 2006 President Gerald Ford was admitted to EMC for sixteen days for treatment of pneumonia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The report recommends a range of guiding principles for medical treatment, including ensuring patient autonomy in decision-making, ensuring non-discrimination, accountability and access to remedies. (wikipedia.org)
  • This report summarizes the findings of the investigations of these incidents, which underscore the need for clinical monitoring for adverse effects in all patients receiving treatment for LTBI. (cdc.gov)
  • She was instructed to contact her health-care provider about adverse effects during treatment. (cdc.gov)
  • On the 49th and last day of treatment, she returned to her health-care provider and was admitted to a hospital because of jaundice and altered mental status. (cdc.gov)
  • Dr. Simeon Josephi was appointed superintendent of the hospital from its opening until May 1887, and strived to base his treatment methods on those used by Dr. Hawthorne. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1930, following the Mental Treatment Act, the asylum was renamed the Colney Hatch Mental Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • Residents are entitled to subsidised treatment from medical practitioners, eligible midwives, nurse practitioners and allied health professionals who have been issued a Medicare provider number, and can also obtain free treatment in public hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medicare benefits are payable for medical treatment provided to admitted patients of private hospitals as well as public hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • In some patients, skin lesions may be the only sign of a systemic fungal infection, and prompt recognition of these lesions may facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. (scielo.br)
  • Information on background variables and treatment was collected during the hospital stay. (ahajournals.org)
  • He was transferred to the intensive-care unit, a chest tube was inserted, and treatment with vancomycin and cefuroxime was initiated. (cdc.gov)
  • inpatient
  • The facility's new Walter and Leonore Annenberg Pavilion, an inpatient pavilion connected to the north end of the existing hospital, opened in late 2010. (wikipedia.org)
  • For this rating section three different types of data from HealthGrades are presented: quality ratings for thirty-two inpatient conditions and procedures, thirteen patient safety indicators, percentage of patients giving the hospital a 9 or 10 (the two highest possible ratings). (wikipedia.org)
  • In its first full year serving children, inpatient admissions accounted for 18,109 patient days . (chkd.org)
  • CHKD Foundation also came into being that year , and inpatient admissions accounted or 36,823 patient days , double what they were when the hospital opened. (chkd.org)
  • admission
  • Background- The relationship between admission glucose levels and outcomes in older diabetic and nondiabetic patients with acute myocardial infarction is not well defined. (ahajournals.org)
  • Prior studies have suggested that an elevated admission glucose level is common in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and is a risk factor for increased mortality and in-hospital complications. (ahajournals.org)
  • In 1958 a new 145-bed admission unit, Halliwick Hospital, was built to the northwest of the main building. (wikipedia.org)
  • Admission preference is given to Mississippi residents in an effort to supply professionals to meet the state's health-care needs. (wikipedia.org)
  • On admission to the hospital, women were more often unconscious. (ahajournals.org)
  • Conclusions- Reported sex differences in stroke care and outcome were mainly explained by the women's higher age and lower level of consciousness on admission. (ahajournals.org)
  • year
  • In the same year the Interdepartmental Institute of Anasthesiology and Resuscitation was established ( presently, Department of Anasthesiology and Intensive Care). (wikipedia.org)
  • During this year he established Barlow Sanatorium to care for others with tuberculosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a typical year the hospital sees 328,207 outpatients, 61,540 people in the emergency department and admits 22,633 people. (wikipedia.org)
  • During his third year, he began his medical residency at the Hospital Policlínico San Martín, a medical center that received the most complicated cases from much of Buenos Aires province. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the same year the hospital was once again renamed, this time as Friern Mental Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • UP providers see about 404,870 patients each year in 170 locations in 38 counties. (wikipedia.org)
  • In that inaugural year, the hospital had 90 employees. (chkd.org)
  • A 58-year-old woman was admitted to Columbia Hospital in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 12 May 1975, for weakness. (annals.org)
  • A 32-year-old white man with tuberculous bowel perforation was admitted after surgery in the intensive care unit with severe sepsis. (scielo.br)
  • Poorer survival for women has been reported in-hospital and after 28 days, 1 but there are also reports of better survival for women after 6 months 4 and after 1 year. (ahajournals.org)
  • In July 1997, a 7-year-old black girl from urban Minnesota was admitted to a tertiary-care hospital with a temperature of 103 F (39.5 C) and right groin pain. (cdc.gov)
  • In January 1999, a 13-year-old white girl from rural Minnesota was brought to a local hospital with fever, hemoptysis, and respiratory distress. (cdc.gov)
  • NICU
  • UMMC has the only hospital in the state designated as a Level 1 trauma center, and the state's only Level 4 neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) located in the Wiser Hospital for Women and Infants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Today thanks to continual advancements, the NICU now routinely cares for babies born as much as three-and-a-half to four months early. (chkd.org)
  • Now CHKD had two dedicated intensive-care units: the NICU for newborns and the PICU for all other children. (chkd.org)
  • health care
  • Aspirus Medford Hospital (formerly Memorial Health Center) is a not-for-profit, primary care health care organization in Taylor and Price Counties in north-central Wisconsin, United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • In April 1990, Memorial Hospital and Community Health Care, Inc., the parent organization of Wausau Hospital, became affiliated. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Barlow team of health care professional helps patients previously unable to be liberated or "weaned" from the ventilator at other hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • They trained and educated the general public, teachers, and nurses and improved health-care delivery. (wikipedia.org)
  • The figures on unnecessary events represent people who are thrust into a dangerous health care system. (whale.to)
  • In many rural counties, due to a range of contributing factors - including a shortage of doctors, a sicker-than-anticipated population, lack of competition in the marketplace, the closing of hospitals and a raging opioid crisis - the outlook is grim" for health care under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, John Collins writes for the liberal magazine In These Times . (blogspot.com)
  • By early 2017, The Wall Street Journal reports , it is estimated that in more than 650 counties - 70 percent of which consist of rural populations - only one option for health care coverage will be offered on the ACA exchanges," Collins writes. (blogspot.com)
  • The mission of the University of Mississippi Medical Center is to improve the health and well-being of patients and the community through excellent training for health-care professionals, engagement in innovative medical research, and the delivery of state-of-the-art health care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medicare is a publicly funded universal health care system in Australia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Operated by the Department of Human Services, Medicare is the primary funder of health care in Australia, funding primary health care for Australian citizens and permanent residents including Norfolk Island. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hawke reintroduced universal health care in 1984 as Medicare. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1972, 17% of Australians outside of Queensland (which had a free public health care system) were uninsured, most of whom were on low incomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • A huge leap in health care for Hampton Roads children occurred in 1985. (chkd.org)
  • As a result, the Malpractice Act greatly favors health care providers. (cohenandmalad.com)
  • The limits are grossly low and have not been increased since 1999 despite the fact that health care costs have increased dramatically. (cohenandmalad.com)
  • No family members resided in LTCFs or worked in health-care settings. (cdc.gov)
  • no family members were health-care workers or employees of an LTCF or had a history of IDU. (cdc.gov)
  • Faculty
  • In 1975 the Clinical Teaching Center was opened in Tychy, and the second Medical Faculty was established in Katowice-Ligota. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences. (diva-portal.org)
  • adequately
  • Activist Dorothea Dix was an advocate of Hawthorne's original hospital, which she had visited twice, and was a vocal critic of the opening of the new state hospital, believing the state was ill-prepared to care for patients adequately. (wikipedia.org)
  • This relative lack of guidance concerning the risk stratification and management of AMI patients with elevated glucose may reflect the fact that many aspects of the relationship between glucose levels and mortality in AMI patients have not been adequately defined. (ahajournals.org)
  • complications
  • We also aimed to explore possible differences in thrombolytic therapy, secondary complications, secondary prevention, and patient satisfaction between men and women. (ahajournals.org)
  • medical malpractice
  • Over the ensuing sixteen years he chaired the medical malpractice department of the firm, which by 1994 was known as Sullivan and Liapakis, P.C. In those sixteen years the medical malpractice department grew to a ten attorney department. (danknermilstein.com)
  • The Medical Malpractice Act was passed in Indiana in 1975 while Dr. Otis Bowen was governor. (cohenandmalad.com)
  • The Medical Malpractice Act also imposes limits on the amount that can be recovered by a patient injured by malpractice. (cohenandmalad.com)
  • If, for example, when babies are born severely disabled (as a result of medical malpractice) and require millions of dollars in care over their lifetimes, once the low limits of Indiana's Malpractice Act are exhausted, these children often have to seek state aid, shifting the costs of malpractice to the taxpayers. (cohenandmalad.com)
  • tuberculosis
  • In its place, between 1908 and 1913 seven new permanent brick villas were built: four for the survivors of the fire, one for subnormal boys with epilepsy or disturbed behaviour and two for patients with tuberculosis or dysentery. (wikipedia.org)
  • nurses
  • The War Hospital was staffed by both Royal Army Medical Corps and civilian doctors, locally recruited nurses and VADs, as well as some of the original civilian staff. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is sometimes possible to arrange extra hours from 2pm to 5pm to help the nurses or do additional work with patients. (projects-abroad.org)
  • In 1912 a disused carpenters' shop and stores by the railway siding were converted into additional accommodation for male patients and further extensions were made to staff accommodation in 1927, by which time staff included 9 full-time doctors, 494 nurses and 171 probationers. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1937 a female nurses' home was built, the resulting transfer of staff allowing the accommodation of 89 female patients in the old nurses' block. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1941 five villas were destroyed by bombs and thirty-six patients and four nurses were killed. (wikipedia.org)
  • wings
  • Completed in September 1968, was the addition of a second floor to the north, south, and west wings of the hospital, increasing its bed count by 60. (wikipedia.org)
  • Costing over £20,000, the extension increased the patient capacity to 600 and a further two new hospital wings were also built in 1905 due to the increasing number of patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • the growing influx of patients led to two additional wings being added onto the hospital, followed by a conversion from gas to electric lighting. (wikipedia.org)
  • severe
  • During the Japanese Occupation, the hospital faced severe water shortages after its water supply was cut. (wikipedia.org)
  • The patient developed severe respiratory distress and hypotension the following day and died. (cdc.gov)
  • doctors
  • In 1959, it was estimated there were 4,000 patients each for the five practicing doctors in the area. (wikipedia.org)
  • When doctors think them able, every patient must do some work about the Sanatorium or go away. (wikipedia.org)
  • Your supervisor at the hospital, the Director General, will then assign you to work with the specialist doctors within the different departments. (projects-abroad.org)
  • Volunteers do not work at the hospitals in the afternoons or evenings, as many of the doctors do not work during that time. (projects-abroad.org)
  • Eisenhower Urgent Cares always staff medical doctors, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners as the medical providers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Following the Japanese surrender and liberation of Singapore in 1945, the three main blocks of the hospital- previously known as the Upper, Middle and Lower blocks- were renamed Bowyer, Stanley and Norris blocks in memory of three doctors who were intimately involved in hospital administration and perished during the Occupation. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was designed to "weed out" cases against doctors and hospitals that lacked merit. (cohenandmalad.com)
  • Even cases of clear malpractice often result in decisions in favor of the doctors or hospitals such that there are absolutely no guarantees as to how these cases will turn out. (cohenandmalad.com)
  • In addition to doctors, at times consciously or unconsciously, protecting other doctors, the doctors on the Panel often know that their malpractice premiums and surcharges payable to the Patient's Compensation Fund will increase if they rule in favor of a patient. (cohenandmalad.com)
  • 1919
  • On March 20, 1919, Protestant Hospital opened its doors. (wikipedia.org)
  • On 7 May 1919 the hospital was deemed surplus to military requirements and was gradually closed down, being handed back to the custody of the Board of Guardians on 8 August, having treated 20,456 wounded servicemen. (wikipedia.org)
  • staff
  • Saint Thomas Midtown Hospital chaplains meet with a department manager to discuss the spiritual care initiative and select a committee of multidisciplinary staff members. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hospital staff request that you spend a minimum of two weeks in each department. (projects-abroad.org)
  • Usually, you will shadow the local staff upon arrival before switching departments. (projects-abroad.org)
  • Most direct patient care in Phnom Penh hospitals is given by family members rather than nursing staff-the role of the nurse in Cambodia is to administer medications, while a family's role can vary from cooking food to donating blood. (projects-abroad.org)
  • The staff at Knowle also developed working relationships with the Royal Hospital Haslar and Netley Hospital, both important Ministry of Defence hospitals with psychiatric facilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • By the 1830s, however, the hospital was riddled with problems such as a failing infrastructure and a shortage of staff- the medical establishment had consisted of just one assistant surgeon and physician, and a few medical subordinates. (wikipedia.org)
  • Consequently, hundreds of patients and staff- both locals and expatriates- perished and were buried in a mass grave on hospital grounds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Marcus and his staff make me feel cared for and they are always there for me. (vitals.com)
  • adverse
  • The number of people having in-hospital, adverse drug reactions (ADR) to prescribed medicine is 2.2 million. (whale.to)
  • 1-20 On the basis of these reports and similar findings in patients with critical illness, 21 the association between glucose levels and adverse outcomes has been a focus of growing attention from expert groups and professional societies. (ahajournals.org)
  • state
  • Medicine interns in Cambodia work in Phnom Penh in a large state hospital. (projects-abroad.org)
  • Since its reopening, the state hospital has become the largest medical facility in Phnom Penh and admits over 17,000 patients annually. (projects-abroad.org)
  • A $212.5 million, four story, state-of-the-art addition to the hospital, the Walter and Leonore Annenberg Pavilion, opened for patient care on November 2, 2010. (wikipedia.org)
  • Originally named the Oregon Hospital for the Insane, the Oregon State Hospital was active in the fields of electroconvulsive therapy, lobotomies, eugenics, and hydrotherapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2007, the state of Oregon approved a $458 million plan to rebuild the main hospital to a downsized 620-bed facility, which was completed in 2013. (wikipedia.org)
  • Oregon State Hospital is located in what is referred to as the Oregon State Hospital Historic District, and was registered with the National Register for Historic Places in 2008. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Oregon constitution mandated that state hospitals be built in the capital city of Salem. (wikipedia.org)
  • The newly-built, state-funded hospital opened as the Oregon State Insane Asylum on October 23, 1883, and was constructed based on the Kirkbride Plan for a total of $184,000 (equivalent to $4,832,629 in 2017). (wikipedia.org)
  • The tunnels connect different buildings of the State Hospital together. (wikipedia.org)
  • The State Capitol and associated buildings also have a tunnel system to this day (parts of which are publicly accessible) but they have never been connected to the State Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • A portion of land on the UMMC campus was once the site of the Mississippi Insane Asylum, which moved its operations in 1935 and became Mississippi State Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • The operation of public hospitals remains within the authority of state and territory governments. (wikipedia.org)
  • facility
  • Only private pay residents were admitted to the facility prior to its becoming Medicare certified in 1998. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the mid-twentieth century, the facility experienced significant overcrowding problems, with a peak of nearly 3,600 patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • The King's Daughters and hospital administrator William Selvey soon led the facility to its first major milestone: its 1962 accreditation by the Joint Commission . (chkd.org)
  • Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an emerging community-acquired pathogen among patients without established risk factors for MRSA infection (e.g., recent hospitalization, recent surgery, residence in a long-term-care facility [LTCF], or injecting-drug use [IDU]) (1). (cdc.gov)
  • pneumonia
  • Women were more likely to develop deep venous thromboses and fractures, whereas men were more likely to develop pneumonia during their hospital stay. (ahajournals.org)
  • respiratory
  • The Barlow Respiratory Hospital is a hospital located in the Elysian Park neighborhood of Echo Park, near Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California. (wikipedia.org)
  • Barlow's TIPS Ventilator Weaning Protocol / Ventilator Weaning: Barlow Respiratory Hospital is recognized for a ventilator weaning success rate of nearly 60%, among the highest rate in the nation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients are guided through a step-by-step method, implemented and monitored by respiratory care practitioners, to recover independent breathing. (wikipedia.org)
  • The same day, the patient had another hip drainage procedure, but had respiratory failure and was placed on mechanical ventilation. (cdc.gov)
  • She was treated with ceftriaxone but developed respiratory failure and cardiac arrest and died within 2 hours of arriving at the hospital. (cdc.gov)
  • Despite pulmonary and hemodynamic support, the patient's respiratory status deteriorated, and she died on the seventh hospital day from progressive cerebral edema and multiorgan failure. (cdc.gov)
  • asylum
  • The 5th NGH was based at the former Leicestershire & Rutland County Asylum (now the University of Leicester), but eventually extended to over 60 sites in Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, including local and cottage hospitals, as well as private homes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Hampshire County Lunatic Asylum was built to the designs of James Harris, architect, and some of the construction of the hospital was undertaken by Russian prisoners from the Crimean War. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first medical superintendent was Dr Ferguson and the partially completed asylum received twenty patients in December 1852, admitted from the workhouse in Fareham. (wikipedia.org)
  • Six other patients were admitted from Grove Place, a private asylum in the nearby village of Nursling. (wikipedia.org)
  • Over 5,500 former patients of the asylum are buried in Knowle Cemetery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stratheden Hospital is currently a small community hospital in Cupar, Fife which was originally called Fife and Kinross District Asylum. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the hospital was opened on 1 July 1866, it was known as the Fife and Kinross District Asylum. (wikipedia.org)
  • The street in Salem on which the current hospital is located, Center Street, was also originally named Asylum Avenue. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hospital was built as the second Middlesex County Asylum and was in operation from 1851 to 1993. (wikipedia.org)
  • The asylum was situated on Friern Barnet Road and is shown on the Ordnance Survey map of 1876-1881, which also marks Colney Hatch Park in the area centred on Springfield Road in New Southgate, in the London Borough of Enfield, although the hospital was located further west in what is now generally called Friern Barnet, in the London Borough of Barnet. (wikipedia.org)
  • residency
  • This residency brought him into contact with patients for the first time. (wikipedia.org)
  • His internship in General Surgery and residency in Neurological Surgery were served at the University of Miami Affiliated Hospitals, completing his chief residency in 1987. (sylvester.org)
  • Medicare
  • As a licensed Critical Access Hospital, Memorial Health Center receives cost-based reimbursement for treating Medicare and Medicaid patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • Privately run hospitals are also part of the Medicare scheme. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, a patient in a private hospital (by definition, a private patient) would need private insurance coverage to help him or her meet any of the hospital charges such as accommodation costs, as well as some or all of the remainder of the doctor's charges above the 75% Medicare benefit. (wikipedia.org)
  • California
  • The hospital operates satellite sites in Van Nuys, California and in Whittier, California. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Eisenhower Medical Center (EMC) is a not-for-profit hospital based in Rancho Mirage, California serving the Coachella Valley region of southeastern California. (wikipedia.org)