• ICUs
  • In the 1970s, parts of public hospital wards were crudely designated as ICUs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Infant Care Review or "Baby Doe" committees were established in many neonatal ICUs across the country as a direct response to the Reagan Administration's Baby Doe regulations. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • organizations
  • Donald E. Callaghan and Jonathan Hirtle, Chief Executive Officer for Hirtle, Callaghan & Co., pioneered the outsourced Chief Investment Officer (OCIO) model, which serves family groups and organizations that do not employ fully staffed investment departments. (wikipedia.org)
  • The conference was attended by 36 individuals: eighteen official delegates from national governments, six delegates from other non-governmental organizations, seven non-official foreign delegates, and the five members of the International Committee. (wikipedia.org)
  • As a result of the 1964 Economic Opportunity Act's Community Action Agencies and the Department of Housing and Urban Development's Office of Neighborhood Development, the economic development role of grassroots organizations and the usefulness of professional advocacy networks, such as the Association for Community Design, were strategically enhanced. (plannersnetwork.org)
  • He also served as an editor of Ecology, held leadership roles in professional organizations, and worked as a consultant or advisor for publishers, major science foundations, and the National Park Service. (uchicago.edu)
  • The correspondence in this series discusses scientific research, University of Chicago administrative matters, the editing of scholarly journals, and the administration of professional organizations, conservation groups and government programs. (uchicago.edu)
  • He belonged to numerous professional organizations, serving as Secretary-Treasurer of the American Bryological Society (1939-1941) and Chairman of the Teaching Section of the Botanical Society of America (1950), as well as administrative positions with the Illinois State Academy of Science. (uchicago.edu)
  • roles
  • Increased staff specialization also occurred during this period of slow growth (i.e., staffers began to be divided into press, legislative, and casework roles). (wikipedia.org)
  • early
  • In the early 1970s, as corporate pension plans were implementing ERISA, investment consulting firms came of age. (wikipedia.org)
  • The IRPP is financed by an endowment fund, to which federal and provincial governments and the private sector contributed in the early 1970s. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the early 1970s, he worked with other Nisei and Sansei (third-generation Japanese American) civil rights activists to combat racial discrimination against Asians. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health
  • 450 practice hours, or 900 if renewing as both a nurse and midwife 35 hours of CPD including 20 hours of participatory learning Five pieces of practice-related feedback Five written reflective accounts Reflective discussion Health and character declaration Professional indemnity arrangement Confirmation A new NMC Code was introduced in March 2015, this replaced the 2008 NMC code. (wikipedia.org)
  • The College represents the paramedic profession across key organisations such as the UK regulator - Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC), the Department of Health and the Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee (JRCALC). (wikipedia.org)
  • The Ministry of Health has provided universal health care in Bhutan since the 1970s. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Medical and Health Council Act of 2002 incorporates the Medical and Health Council as a legal entity to regulate medical schools, courses, and professional credentials. (wikipedia.org)
  • late
  • Doug Muzzio, a Baruch College political scientists who was on Olivieri's staff in the late 1970s, recalled how after being diagnosed with brain cancer, his boss - a one-time marathon runner - studied the best way to combat the effects of chemotherapy. (timesunion.com)
  • development
  • This reflected the association's ambitions to be not only the professional voice of pre-hospital ambulance clinicians, but as the driving authority for increasing sections of pre-hospital clinical care education, training, proficiency and continuous professional development. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Board of Trustees is supported by an Executive Team and staff, including the Chief Executive, the National Education Lead, the Head of Professional Development, the Research Lead, the Head of Administration and the Marketing Manager. (wikipedia.org)
  • He was also active in university-wide committees and governance, contributing to administrative direction in development, campus housing, admissions and aid, and changes in undergraduate education. (uchicago.edu)
  • 6 Professional Development. (docplayer.it)
  • SUTEP is part of WCU's effort to improve the academic achievement of students in all grade levels by providing assistance to educators at each step in their development - as student teachers, as they first enter the teaching profession, and as they reach the middle of their careers and seek additional professional development. (ncdcr.gov)
  • make
  • But the very fact that Eisenhower had policies worthy of attention (whatever their merit), like the fact of his popularity, seemed by the 1970s to make it necessary to reconsider the notion that his presidency was simply a time of leaderless inaction. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Although there have been periodic attempts to use similar "ethics committees" to make decisions for individual patients (for example, psychosurgery committees), prospective decisionmaking by committee for individual patients has never held wide support either in the medical community or the public. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • students
  • Brunel has over 12,900 students and 2,500 staff, and had a total income of £200.7 million in 2014/15, of which 25% came from grants and research contracts. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] The decision to award an honorary degree to Margaret Thatcher in 1996, following the University of Oxford's refusal to do so, provoked an outcry by staff and students, and as a result the ceremony had to be held in the House of Lords instead of on campus. (wikipedia.org)
  • office
  • General meetings of work collectives at every enterprise and office elected the committees for tenures of two and one-half years. (wikipedia.org)
  • the percentage of congressional staff who worked in a district office went from 14% in 1960 to 34% in 1974. (wikipedia.org)
  • Support agency staff, non-partisan employees of the Congressional Research Service (CRS), Congressional Budget Office (CBO), and Government Accountability Office (GAO). (wikipedia.org)
  • public
  • On February 9, 1863 in Geneva, Henry Dunant founded the "Committee of the Five" (together with four other leading figures from well-known Geneva families) as an investigatory commission of the Geneva Society for Public Welfare. (thefullwiki.org)
  • On the other hand, the strategy of using ethics committees to provide "comfort" for physicians and others worried about either legal liability or public reaction has prospered. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Roe v. Wade and its companion case Doe v. Botton ended the abortion committees, and both public reaction and the End-Stage Renal Disease Act ended the dialysis patient selection committees. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • member
  • He made his debut exhibition at the first photographic Spring exhibition 1976, he was secretary of the board for a short time, later juror and member of the committee. (wikipedia.org)
  • group
  • A group of parents formed the Committee for Catholic Secondary Education and reopened the school in Fall 1987 as a Catholic high school not affiliated with the diocese, though still renting the original school facilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • money
  • Senators from California, the most populous state, get more money for staff than Senators from Wyoming, the least populous state. (wikipedia.org)
  • held
  • In October (26-29) 1863, the international conference organized by the committee was held in Geneva to develop possible measures to improve medical services on the battle field. (thefullwiki.org)
  • In the 1970s and 1990s, "staff numbers generally held level and increases were held down. (wikipedia.org)
  • services
  • The official journal of YALSA is called Young Adult Library Services and it provides articles of current interest, book reviews, professional literature and serves as the official record of the organization. (wikipedia.org)
  • House
  • Prior to his current role, he served more than 30 years working for the U.S. House of Representatives, 29 of which were on the professional staff of the Committee on Science and Technology, which he first joined in 1977 and returned to in 1984 after three years in the private sector. (orau.org)
  • The House first approved personal staff for Representatives in 1893. (wikipedia.org)
  • Former
  • 1965) Pavel Kovanov Gennady Voronov (1971-) Alexey Shkolnikov (1974-) Sergey Manyakin (1987-) Gennady Kolbin (1989-) Central Auditing Commission A Country Study: Soviet Union (Former), section "Committees of People's Control" Adams, Jan S. (1978). (wikipedia.org)
  • Graham Fox, former strategic policy advisor at Fraser Milner Casgrain LLP and former chief of staff to the Rt. (wikipedia.org)
  • groups
  • Community participation, on the other hand, covers all the scales and techniques but refers to the processes involving professionals, families, community groups and government officials in shaping the environment. (plannersnetwork.org)
  • CDCs became the staging ground for professionals to represent the interests of disenfranchised community groups. (plannersnetwork.org)
  • authority
  • These committees had the authority to audit government and economic administration records. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although the Quinlan case has been the touchtone for legal and ethical discussions of the right to refuse medical treatment for the past fifteen years, no other court has delegated immunity-granting authority to an ethics committee. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • develop
  • He served on university committees to develop undergraduate programs in the biological sciences, as well as teacher education programs. (uchicago.edu)
  • alternative
  • Under the threat of intrusive federal investigations, the American Academy of Pediatrics and others recommended an alternative: hospital-based committees that would be available to review contested decisions to withdraw treatment from handicapped newborns. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Lead
  • Without the threat of legal liability and community disapproval (which could lead to new laws), ethics committees would probably not have developed at all. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • District
  • He also served as an enlisted soldier in the Tennessee Army National Guard and District of Columbia Army National Guard in the 1970s. (wikipedia.org)
  • operations
  • By the beginning of the 20th century, congressional staff had become well-accepted feature of congressional operations. (wikipedia.org)
  • central
  • Nikita Khrushchev, seeking to emulate the Bolsheviks but as part of his de-Stalinization efforts, merged them again and created the Committee of Party-State Control of the Central Committee of the CPSU and of the Council of Ministers of the USSR, putting the ambitious Alexander Shelepin in charge. (wikipedia.org)
  • education
  • set the standards for pre-registration nursing education ensure that nurses and midwives keep their skills and knowledge up to date and uphold the standards of their professional code. (wikipedia.org)
  • families
  • The subtitle referred to the New Jersey Supreme Court's suggestion that instead of bringing cases like Quinlan to court, families and physicians should rely on a hospital ethics committee. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • years
  • Following the significant increase in 1947, there was gradual growth in the number of both kinds of staff for about twenty years. (wikipedia.org)
  • review
  • Jones, who said he uses marijuana to ease the pain of an old motorcycle injury, cited fears about legal and even licensure issues that kept doctors from joining the review committee. (timesunion.com)
  • In the 1960s some states required that hospital review committees approved any abortion before it could be legally performed. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • time
  • At the time, teachers were fighting to achieve basic rights just to organize, so the priority was on establishing locals and helping them achieve the pay, benefits, and working conditions that teachers demanded and deserved as professionals. (aft.org)
  • There are several theories, ranging from bureaucratic inertia to fears of a professional stigma, and the possibility that it may simply have been ahead of its time. (timesunion.com)
  • Board
  • This led to the formation of the Sub-specialty Training Committee in ICM in 2007 and ICM was recognised as a sub-specialty with the Specialists Accreditation Board in 2012. (wikipedia.org)