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  • bighorn
  • 1999-04-21 04:00:00 PDT SIERRA NEVADA -- In an unusual move, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service extended emergency protection yesterday to the Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep, a rare wild ungulate that only exists in a few remote enclaves in the High Sierra. (sfgate.com)
  • Among those species are the Asian argali, the Barbary sheep, or aoudad, of North Africa, and the North American bighorn bighorn or Rocky Mountain sheep, wild sheep, Ovis canadensis, of W North America, formerly plentiful in mountains from SW Canada to N Mexico. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Years of research have shown that when bighorns interact with their tame cousins, massive bighorn sheep die-offs soon follow. (hcn.org)
  • This summer, the Forest Service for the first time barred domestic sheep from those parts of the forest that connect with bighorn sheep habitat. (hcn.org)
  • A 2016 genetics study confirmed significant divergence between the three subspecies of North America's bighorn sheep: Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep, Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep and desert bighorn sheep. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep were listed as a federally endangered subspecies in 2000. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep are gregarious, with group size and composition depending on gender and season. (wikipedia.org)
  • A group of stakeholders drafted the Sierra Nevada Bighorn Sheep Recovery Plan, and CDFW formed the Sierra Nevada Bighorn Sheep Recovery Program to work toward the goals of the Recovery Plan. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2014, fourteen Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep were flown to Big Arroyo in Sequoia National Park via helicopter to establish a population on the western side of the Sierra Crest. (wikipedia.org)
  • Emergency Rule To List the Sierra Nevada Distinct Population Segment of California Bighorn Sheep as Endangered AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. (fws.gov)
  • SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), exercise our authority to emergency list the Sierra Nevada distinct population segment of California bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis californiana), occupying the Sierra Nevada of California, as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act). (fws.gov)
  • The Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep is known from five disjunct subpopulations along the eastern escarpment of the Sierra Nevada totaling about 100 animals. (fws.gov)
  • Because these threats constitute an emergency posing a significant risk to the well-being of the Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep, we find that emergency listing is necessary. (fws.gov)
  • A proposed rule to list the Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep as endangered is published concurrently with this emergency rule in this same issue of the Federal Register in the proposed rule section. (fws.gov)
  • Background The bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) is a large mammal (family Bovidae) originally described by Shaw in 1804 (Wilson and Reeder 1993). (fws.gov)
  • However, recent genetic studies question the validity of some of these subspecies and suggest a need to re-evaluate overall bighorn sheep taxonomy. (fws.gov)
  • For example, Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep appear to be more closely related to desert bighorn sheep than the O. c. californiana found in British Columbia (Ramey 1991, 1993). (fws.gov)
  • Regardless, the Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep meets our criteria for consideration as a distinct vertebrate population segment (as discussed below) and is treated as such in this emergency rule. (fws.gov)
  • Currently, five subpopulations of Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep occur at Lee Vining Canyon, Wheeler Crest, Mount Baxter, Mount Williamson, and Mount Langley in Mono and Inyo counties, three of which are reintroduced subpopulations established from sheep obtained from the Mount Baxter subpopulation from 1979 to 1986 (Wehausen et al. (fws.gov)
  • 1987). The Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep is similar in appearance to other desert associated bighorn sheep. (fws.gov)
  • In comparison to many other desert bighorn sheep, the horns of the Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep are generally more divergent as they coil out from the base (Wehausen 1983). (fws.gov)
  • local breeds
  • Although introgression of genes for specific traits or characteristics from local breeds to commercial breeds has been very limited so far, Notter (1999) suggested that, as in plants, useful genes may exist in lowly productive types and recommended systematic programmes for genetic resources conservation, evaluation and use. (fao.org)
  • Development efforts have commonly concentrated on the promotion of exotic breeds and crossbreeding than on improving local breeds. (grain.org)
  • This shortcut bypassed the poor and often caused the disappearance of local breeds. (grain.org)
  • Opportunities to work with local communities to improve their livelihoods and security through enhancing local breeds have not been given attention that is urgently needed. (grain.org)
  • Preventing further losses and conserving local breeds is not a romantic or nostalgic adventure - it is a must. (grain.org)
  • These 'international' breeds have been steadily pushing aside local breeds, which is why 38% of European breeds are now facing extinction 4 . (grain.org)
  • Over the past few decades, the improvement of local breeds by crossing them with such international breeds has met limited success in the South (see box over page). (grain.org)
  • commercial breeds
  • However, in addition to in situ conservation, methods or techniques to maintain live animals outside their production or natural environment (ex situ live) or through cryopreservation of germplasm (ex situ) are set up to preserve (germplasm of) rare breeds as well as the more widely used commercial breeds. (fao.org)
  • Cattle
  • Storey's Illustrated Breed Guide to Sheep, Goats, Cattle and Pigs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Being such a huge continent, horses, cattle, sheep and dog breeds have all been developed in different regions. (infobarrel.com)
  • When the seven year drought of the 1950s begin, Myrtle and Charlie, phased out Herefords and begin breeding Charolais, Brangus and Charbray cattle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Campbell Island cattle were a feral breed of domestic cattle (Bos taurus) found on Campbell Island, New Zealand. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cattle were introduced to Campbell Island in 1902, along with sheep and other livestock, as part of an ill-fated attempt to establish farming there. (wikipedia.org)
  • A small herd of about 20 animals persisted until the 1970s, after which a programme of eradicating introduced livestock was implemented, with the cattle being exterminated by about 1984. (wikipedia.org)
  • But Moore pointed out that in the 1920s, domestic sheep were replacing cattle on the Hells Canyon rangeland. (hcn.org)
  • Through the rest of New Zealand, sheep farming is the major rural activity, with beef cattle farming in the hills and high country, and dairying increasing in Canterbury, Otago and Southland. (wikipedia.org)
  • There were 38.5 million sheep and 4.39 million beef cattle in New Zealand in June 2007. (wikipedia.org)
  • The number of sheep saw a substantial fall from the 70.3 million in 1982, while beef cattle numbers declined by about ten percent over the same period. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rancho Los Encinos near Los Angeles was founded in 1797, and raised cattle , sheep and wheat , and was a stagecoach stop, before becoming a real estate subdivision with Los Encinos State Historic Park at its heart? (thefullwiki.org)
  • Goats
  • Mawuena, K, High degree of tolerance to trypanosomes in West African dwarf sheep and goats of the South Guinea regions of Togo. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Concerns have been raised about the disease-spreading potential that domestic goats may pose to wild animals, such as mountain sheep and mountain goats. (wikipedia.org)
  • He developed a herd of large mixed-breed goats and used them as early as the 1970s to pack supplies for scientists working in the mountains and later to carry food and gear for tourists on hiking trips. (wikipedia.org)
  • Watchlist
  • In 2017, the Rare Breeds Survival Trust listed the Jacob in Category 6 ("Other UK Native Breeds") of its watchlist, in which categories 1-5 are for various degrees of conservation risk, and category 6 is for breeds which have more than 3000 breeding females registered in the herd-book. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1980s
  • The government offered a number of subsidies during the 1970s to assist farmers after the United Kingdom joined the European Economic Community and by the early 1980s government support provided some farmers with 40 percent of their income. (wikipedia.org)
  • The production of cotton, tea, and tobacco virtually collapsed during the late 1970s and early 1980s. (wikipedia.org)
  • species
  • The measure extends full protection under the U.S. Endangered Species Act for 240 days, allowing wildlife managers to employ controversial measures to save the animals, such as capturing many for breeding programs and killing mountain lions that have been preying on them. (sfgate.com)
  • It is also possible that the breed shares some ancestry, together with the Cretan Hound, from the smaller and more slender Ethiopian Wolf (Canis simensis) and perhaps even the Southern sub-species Canis simensis citernii, rather than the larger and heavier Grey wolf (Canis lupus) ancestral species. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are few terrestrial species, but relatively many breeding seabirds and marine animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some sub-species and breeds are endemic. (wikipedia.org)
  • During the ten thousand years of agricultural history, 40 animal species have been domesticated and many thousand breeds have been developed. (grain.org)
  • A "breed" is usually a group of animals with definable and identifiable external characteristics that distinguish it from other groups within the same species. (grain.org)
  • Livestock keepers in the South usually keep a mix of species breeds that are adapted to local conditions. (grain.org)
  • By contrast, farms in North America and Western Europe rely on a few species and breeds, commonly bred from very few males selected for maximum yield. (grain.org)
  • Numbering a little over 1 billion, domestic sheep are the most numerous species in their genus . (thefullwiki.org)
  • Wild sheep are largely variations of brown hues, and variation with species is extremely limited. (thefullwiki.org)
  • flock
  • Carl is concerned about the future of the breed and specifically his flock as he reaches an age he will need to retire. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fancy's Family Farm, a community farm on the Isle of Portland is home to the only flock of the Portland Sheep breed on the island. (wikipedia.org)
  • A breed society was formed in 1969, and a flock book was published from 1972. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to the Book of Genesis (Genesis 30:31-43), Jacob took every speckled and spotted sheep from his father-in-law's (Laban's) flock and bred them. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mary Cavendish, dowager Duchess of Devonshire, who had a flock of Jacob sheep at Chatsworth House in Derbyshire, was the first president of the society. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] The Jacob was introduced to Israel in 2016, when a small flock of about 120 head was shipped there from Canada by a couple who believes the breed is the same one mentioned in Genesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • A group of sheep is called a flock, herd or mob. (thefullwiki.org)
  • British Isles
  • 4 It has been bred in the British Isles for several hundred years. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the modern era, Australia , New Zealand , the southern and central South American nations, and the British Isles are most closely associated with sheep production. (thefullwiki.org)
  • wild sheep
  • For at least 20 years, biologists have recommended keeping domestic and wild sheep apart on the range. (hcn.org)
  • Nearly 20,000 domestic sheep still graze on parts of the Payette National Forest in Idaho, which contains ideal range - for both domestic and wild sheep - and is contiguous with Hells Canyon. (hcn.org)
  • New telemetry data have confirmed what biologists long suspected: Wild sheep from Hells Canyon are roaming onto domestic grazing allotments on the Payette. (hcn.org)
  • But the recovery of the bighorns may depend, ultimately, on the outcome of a continuing legal dispute between supporters of wild sheep reintroduction and longtime domesticated sheep ranchers in Idaho. (hcn.org)
  • It was late October 1939, and Don Moore had been sent to find the last of Oregon's wild sheep. (hcn.org)
  • fleece
  • In the early 1970s, Dr. Glenn Spurlock of Davis, California crossed Tunis sheep and Barbados Blackbelly sheep, and the California Red is consequently a dual-purpose breed with many of the qualities of its forebears, the out-of season breeding qualities and fleece of the Tunis and the heat tolerance and carcase quality of the Blackbelly. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Portland is a small sheep, with a cream fleece and golden tan face and legs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sheep figure in many mythologies -such as the Golden Fleece -and major religions, especially the Abrahamic traditions. (thefullwiki.org)
  • Barbados Blackbelly
  • The Barbados Blackbelly (above), the Rambouilette and the Mouflon all figure in the make-up of the Barbado breed. (infobarrel.com)
  • The Barbados Blackbelly is a different breed but one of the parents of the Barbado, sometimes referred to as the American Blackbelly. (infobarrel.com)
  • primitive
  • According to the most universally accepted cynological classification (FCI Spitz and Primitive Types Group), the breed belongs to the Primitive Group of dogs. (wikipedia.org)
  • descendant of ancient
  • The Pomeranian dog, said to be a descendant of ancient Dalmatian / Illyrian dogs and especially those from the island of Melite / Melita (Mljet) in the Adriatic Sea, which used to be a Greek territory until the 12th century, is probably a descendant of the Alopekis and the Meliteo Kynidio / Small Greek Domestic Dog. (wikipedia.org)
  • animals
  • The first animals to arrive were blackbuck antelope and auodad sheep. (wikipedia.org)
  • The deer-farm stock was bred from the recovered wild animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • By that time, Jacobs were often kept as ornamental animals grazed in parks, which probably kept the breed extant. (wikipedia.org)
  • By the 1970s about 250 animals remained, occupying only two small areas of their former vast range. (wikipedia.org)
  • Global diversity in domestic animals is considered to be under threat. (fao.org)
  • In farm animals, trends in within-breed diversity are as important as between-breed diversity to be able to cope with changing requirements and future demands in breeding and selection. (fao.org)
  • The combination of intensive selection and the use of techniques like artificial insemination have made it possible to produce large populations of genetically similar, high-performing animals of the same breed, but at the expense of their genetic diversity. (grain.org)
  • It has been predicted that by 2015 the genetic diversity within this breed will correspond to that of only 66 animals. (grain.org)
  • In both ancient and modern religious ritual, sheep are used as sacrificial animals . (thefullwiki.org)
  • relatively
  • International" or "modern" high-performing breeds are those produced through very intensive selection for one or few production traits in a relatively short period. (grain.org)
  • primarily
  • There it was primarily used for the production of sheep milk as well as lamb and mutton. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some strategies focus primarily on preservation of germplasm of rare breeds, but in general there is consensus that ex situ collections should be established for all breeds with the aim to capture as much allelic or genetic diversity in conservation programmes as possible. (fao.org)
  • conservation
  • A small effective population size in rare or endangered breeds requires monitoring of within-breed diversity and conservation programmes to maintain within-breed diversity. (fao.org)
  • In general, in situ conservation or conservation by utilization is preferred as a mechanism to conserve breeds. (fao.org)
  • Conservation without further development of the breed or without expected future use is not a desirable strategy. (fao.org)
  • genetic
  • Outcrossing with other types of Welsh Mountain sheep may also have occurred, and this would have increased the genetic diversity of the breed. (wikipedia.org)
  • The domestic dog represents one of the most beautiful genetic sculptures shaped by nature and man. (mercola.com)
  • There is worldwide consensus on the global decline in domestic animal diversity and the need to conserve genetic diversity. (fao.org)
  • Dorset
  • The Portland is a sheep breed that takes its name from the Isle of Portland in Dorset, England. (wikipedia.org)
  • Once common all over Dorset, the breed was once one of the rarest in Britain and is still at risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • As one of the very old tan-faced breeds native to heathlands, the Portland was a primary contributor to the Dorset breed. (wikipedia.org)
  • farmers
  • cows and sheep are rarely housed or fed large quantities of grain, with most farmers using grass based supplements such as hay and silage during feed shortages. (wikipedia.org)
  • domestication
  • In 2009, a study which used endogenous retrovirus markers to investigate the history of sheep domestication found the Jacob to be more closely linked to sheep from Africa and South-west Asia than to other British breeds,:4 though all domestic breeds can be traced back to an origin the Fertile Crescent. (wikipedia.org)
  • carcass
  • Though current breeders do not have the resources to continue this methodology, one has used traditional stud phenotipic selection, with an emphasis on confirmation, and carcass market suitability, as this is where the economics of the [sheep] enterprise is based at present. (wikipedia.org)
  • It can be argued that the Elliottdale breed was the most successful breed in the carcass competitions held. (wikipedia.org)
  • small
  • Balwen Welsh Mountain sheep originate from one small area of Wales - the Tywi valley. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alopekis morphology suggests a natural - archaic dog type, ancestral / archetypical to the subsequent central European small Spitz/ Nordic and Terrier breeds. (wikipedia.org)
  • He heard stories of abundant mountain sheep that once inhabited the rugged country between the Wallowas and the Snake River Canyon and recorded the tales in a small field notebook. (hcn.org)
  • several
  • The breed is mentioned by several ancient Greek and classical writers such as Aristotle, Xenophon, and Aristophanes, and is depicted in many archaeological finds such as pottery, carvings, statuettes, sculpture, tomb monuments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several of the sheep were purchased by a member of the Elliott Research Station team, Carl Terrey. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several authors also emphasized the reduction in effective population sizes of widely used domestic animal breeds (e.g. (fao.org)
  • Domestic sheep differ from their wild relatives and ancestors in several respects, having become uniquely neotenic as a result of man's influence. (thefullwiki.org)
  • Most horned breeds have a single pair, but a few breeds may have several. (thefullwiki.org)
  • diseases
  • However, disease played the largest role in the decline of the subspecies with domestic sheep transmitting virulent diseases, in particular pneumonia from Pasteurella, beginning in the 1870s. (wikipedia.org)
  • large
  • The Jacob was kept for centuries as a "park sheep", to ornament the large estates of landowners. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sheep-raising has a large lexicon of unique terms which vary considerably by region and dialect . (thefullwiki.org)
  • agricultural
  • Eric John Underwood spent 30 years researching the effects of sulphur , botulism and the nutritional value of hay on sheep at Avondale Agricultural Research Station ? (thefullwiki.org)
  • pasture
  • This volume contains in-depth information on breed selection, feeding, pasture maintenance, as well as disease prevention and treatment. (infobarrel.com)