• mice
  • The virus infects adult immunocompetent mice and is a well-established model for studying genetic resistance to infection by an immunosuppressive retrovirus. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a study of vaccinated mice, it was possible to identify the immunological epitopes required for protection against the virus, thus determining the types of immunological responses necessary or required for protection against it. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1962 Alfred P. Sloan Award in Cancer Research 1986 Honorary Doctor of Science, Brandeis University "Cell-Free Transmission in Adult Swiss Mice of a Disease Having the Character of a Leukemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1956, Dr. Friend gave a paper at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research in which she stated that she had discovered a virus that caused a leukemia-like disorder in newborn mice. (mssm.edu)
  • It replicates very rapidly in mice of all strains so far tested, produces a stable infection with a continuously high level of infective virus in the blood for the remainder of the animal's life, yet causes no harm to its host. (springer.com)
  • However, no doubt because of the permanence of the infected state, the virus survives in wild mice and is easily transmitted inadvertently by experimental procedures. (springer.com)
  • A plasma lactic dehydrogenase-elevating virus associated with scrapie-infected mice. (springer.com)
  • The effect of tumours, of leukaemia, and of some viruses associated with them, on the plasma lactic dehydrogenase activity of mice. (springer.com)
  • avian
  • Hizi A, Gazit A, Buthmann D, Yaniv A. DNA-processing activities associated with the purified α, β 2 , αβ 2 molecular forms of avian sarcoma virus RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. (springer.com)
  • Journal of Exper
  • By the next year, Dr. Friend had published her work in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, under the careful editing of Peyton Rous. (mssm.edu)
  • thus
  • Thus, viruses not only have been shown to represent etiologic agents for many human cancers but have also served as tools to reveal mechanisms that are involved in all human malignancies. (aacrjournals.org)
  • 1970s
  • Tumor virologists additionally recognized that viruses could serve as powerful discovery tools, leading to revolutionary breakthroughs in the 1970s and 1980s that included the concept of the oncogene, the identification of the p53 tumor suppressor, and the function of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor. (aacrjournals.org)
  • research
  • The decline in federal funds for basic research led Dr. Friend to write several protest letters to congressmen and others in power. (mssm.edu)
  • cell
  • In 1966, Dr. Friend left Sloan-Kettering to become the first Director of the Center for Experimental Cell Biology and a Professor at the still developing Mount Sinai School of Medicine. (mssm.edu)
  • A truly silent virus would replicate, causing no change in its host cell, damage to infected tissue or immune response and would presumably be of no consequence. (springer.com)
  • time
  • By the time she received her doctorate in 1950, Dr. Friend already had a position in the laboratory of Dr. Alice Moore at the Sloan-Kettering Institute in New York City. (mssm.edu)
  • important
  • It is the relatively silent viruses which cause virtually no pathological changes but can alter the response of a test system, which are important. (springer.com)