• vivax malaria
  • For example, P. vivax infections induce a greater inflammatory response in the lungs than is observed in P. falciparum infections, and progressive alveolar capillary dysfunction is observed after the treatment of vivax malaria. (wikipedia.org)
  • Papua New Gu
  • For his work in combating malaria in Papua New Guinea he was made a Member of the Order of the British Empire in 1945. (wikipedia.org)
  • A series of major epidemics of malaria had occurred in Papua New Guinea [iii] among the Allied military forces in 1942-1943 as they struggled to halt the Japanese advance through the chain of islands to Australia's north. (jmvh.org)
  • 2001
  • Chenjerai "Hitler" Hunzvi (23 October 1949 - 4 June 2001) served as Chairman of the Zimbabwe National Liberation War Veterans Association beginning in 1997. (wikipedia.org)
  • parasite
  • The prevalences of malaria parasite infections in humans and anopheline mosquitoes before and after treatment were studied. (wikipedia.org)
  • He initially called them dapple-wings and following the hypothesis of Sir Patrick Manson that the agent that causes malaria was spread by the mosquito, he was able to find the malaria parasite in a mosquito that he artificially fed on a malaria patient. (collectgbstamps.co.uk)
  • Later using birds that were sick with malaria, he was able to ascertain the entire life cycle of the malarial parasite, including its presence in the mosquito's salivary glands. (collectgbstamps.co.uk)
  • They had been exposed to malaria mosquitos in cages strapped to their hands or arms so as to ensure infection with the parasite. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since malaria infects red blood cells, these genetic changes are most commonly alterations to molecules essential for red blood cell function (and therefore parasite survival), such as hemoglobin or other cellular proteins or enzymes of red blood cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several inherited variants in red blood cells have become common in parts of the world where malaria is frequent as a result of selection exerted by this parasite. (wikipedia.org)
  • tuberculosis
  • In 1949 he received a fellowship to study at the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research in New York City, he worked on mycobacterium Bairnsdale bacillus, which causes Buruli ulcer, the third most important mycobacterial disease worldwide after tuberculosis and leprosy. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1942
  • The Program had evolved from the Office of Malaria Control in War Areas, which had been created in 1942 to suppress malaria near military bases in the United States during World War II. (wikipedia.org)
  • From 1942 to 1945, Schilling's research of malaria and attempts at fighting it using synthetic drugs resulted in over a thousand cases of human experimentation on camp prisoners. (wikipedia.org)
  • Schilling returned to Germany after a meeting with Leonardo Conti, the Nazis' Health Chief, in 1941, and by early 1942 he was provided with a special malaria research station at Dachau's concentration camp by Heinrich Himmler, the leader of the SS. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1954
  • The target population of 83,000 received a single dose of pyrimethamine at the beginning of the malaria season in 1953 and 1954. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is an inherited disorder - the first ever to be attributed to a specific genetic modification (mutation), in 1949 by Linus Pauling (two-times Nobel laureate, for Chemistry in 1954, and Peace, in 1962). (labspaces.net)
  • severe
  • On the one hand, conservationists and many wildlife biologists assert that the losses have been severe, and in some cases catastrophic. (newyorker.com)
  • Drug-resistant malaria was an issue causing severe tensions between the Royal Australian Army Medical Corps (RAAMC) medical officers serving in the field in South-East Asia and their superiors in the Army Medical Directorate (AMD) in Melbourne and later Canberra. (jmvh.org)
  • frequent
  • Observations made during the mid-20th century and building on Pauling's findings, revealed that the sickle mutation is, in fact, highly, selected in populations from areas of the world were malaria is very frequent, with sometimes 10-40% of the population carrying this mutation. (labspaces.net)
  • drug-resistant
  • MDAs are likely to encourage the spread of drug-resistant parasites and so have only a limited role in malaria control. (wikipedia.org)
  • [i] Successive contingents of Australian soldiers serving in Malaya from the mid-1950s to the early 1960s and then in Vietnam from the early 1970s encountered drug-resistant malaria. (jmvh.org)
  • That the 1MRL would survive was, however, doubtful, because its early years were troubled and it could do little to stem the rising tide of drug-resistant malaria in Vietnam during the late 1960s. (jmvh.org)
  • Whilst
  • Whilst working with Royal Air Force casualties during World War II, Ridley noticed that when splinters of perspex from aircraft cockpit canopies became lodged in the eyes of wounded pilots, they did not trigger rejection, leading him to propose the use of artificial lenses in the eye to correct cases of cataracts. (collectgbstamps.co.uk)
  • Whilst in Palestine he fell ill with a serious case of malaria and returned to England, resigning from the army. (wikipedia.org)
  • Disease
  • About 80% of sickle-cell disease cases are believed to occur in sub-Saharan Africa. (wikipedia.org)
  • These findings, by the research team lead by Miguel P. Soares, open the way to new therapeutic interventions against malaria, a disease that continues to inflict tremendous medical, social and economic burdens to a large proportion of the human population. (labspaces.net)
  • Within months, he launched the first-ever disease surveillance program, which confirmed his suspicion that malaria, on which CDC spent the largest portion of its budget, had long since disappeared. (cdc.gov)
  • Overall, NCDs represented 38 % of all disease cases, primarily in the form of type 2 diabetes ( n = 1440) and hypertension ( n = 1398). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Malaria cases represented the largest single portion of the disease burden with 5310 recorded cases, followed by type 2 diabetes with 1400 cases. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This intersection of old and new disease paradigms has translated to an increased strain on the country's existing health care system, which has had to expand its scope of services in order to deal with the increasing number of NCD cases while at the same time coping with the ongoing burdens of TB, malaria, and HIV and AIDS. (biomedcentral.com)
  • prisoners
  • Although in the 1930s Schilling had stressed the point that malaria research on human subjects could be performed in an entirely harmless fashion, the Dachau subjects included prisoners who were injected with synthetic drugs at doses ranging from high to lethal. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1950
  • By 1950, only 2,000 cases were reported. (wikipedia.org)
  • Simão Dias was published in 1949 and her third book, A sombra do patriarca (In the Shadow of Patriarchy) was published in 1950. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the case went to trial in 1950, Federal Judge Frank McLaughlin ruled against the government and the land was released back to the members of the Kotohira Jinsha community. (wikipedia.org)
  • research
  • Returning to Australia in 1949, he was appointed Professor of Microbiology at the new John Curtin School of Medical Research at the Australian National University, Canberra. (wikipedia.org)
  • These tensions and the reality of Paludrine-resistant malaria parasites in Malaya and Vietnam prompted the establishment of a new Army malaria research facility in 1966. (jmvh.org)
  • Modelled on the Army's Land Headquarters Medical Research Unit (LHQMRU) of World War II, 1MRL eventually developed into the present Australian Army Malaria Institute (AAMI). (jmvh.org)
  • struggle
  • As with Parts 1 to 3 in this series of articles, Part 4 tells its story biographically, through reference to the lives and work of the Army's medically trained administrators, field officers and scientists who led the struggle against malaria in Malaya and Vietnam. (jmvh.org)
  • army
  • During World War II she worked on malaria with the Australian Army Nursing Service and through her work met Fenner. (wikipedia.org)
  • high
  • Recent proposals to eliminate or even to eradicate malaria have led to a renewed interest in mass drug administrations in areas with very high malaria endemicity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ṭhānissaro Bhikkhu was born Geoffrey DeGraff in 1949 and was introduced to the Buddha's teaching on the Four Noble Truths as a high schooler, during a plane ride from the Philippines. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition to the provisions which shall be implemented in peace time, the present Convention shall apply to all cases of declared war or of any other armed conflict which may arise between two or more of the High Contracting Parties, even if the state of war is not recognized by one of them. (icrc.org)
  • The Convention shall also apply to all cases of partial or total occupation of the territory of a High Contracting Party, even if the said occupation meets with no armed resistance. (icrc.org)
  • placement
  • A species Haemoproteus raymundi has been described from a specimen from Goa but the identification and taxonomic placement of this malaria-like protozoan is disputed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Drugs
  • This article describes the administration of antimalarial drugs to whole populations an intervention which has been used as a malaria-control measure for more than 70 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • World Wa
  • Until the previous day, they had worked for Malaria Control in War Areas, the predecessor of CDC ( Figure_1 ), which had successfully kept the southeastern states malaria-free during World War II and, for approximately 1 year, from murine typhus fever. (cdc.gov)
  • During the 25 years following World War II, malaria re-emerged as a major threat to Australian military personnel deployed to malarious regions in South-East Asia. (jmvh.org)
  • control
  • In the following three years, 1955 to 1957, pyrimethamine administration was replaced with Dieldrin spraying to consolidate malaria control, which makes an assessment of the long-term effect of this MDA impossible. (wikipedia.org)
  • social
  • The book, about a young woman who leaves the city and goes to a farm in the north to recuperate from malaria, explores class differences, generational differences, social identity, and how patriarchy effects the various women (and men) in the novel. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • The last known case of naturally transmitted smallpox occurred in Somalia in 1977. (wikipedia.org)
  • Malaria has placed the strongest known selective pressure on the human genome since the origination of agriculture within the past 10,000 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cases of nests being parasitised by the grey-bellied cuckoo are known. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ṭhānissaro Bhikkhu, also known as Ajaan Geoff (born 1949), is an American Buddhist monk. (wikipedia.org)
  • military
  • In the course of the Dachau Trials following the liberation of the camp at the close of the war, Schilling was tried by a U.S. General Military Court, appointed at November 2 1945 in the case of The United States versus Martin Gottfried Weiss, Wilhelm Rupert, et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • After the war, Padgett spent many months in military hospitals recovering from the tropical diseases (Malaria, Beri-Beri and amoebic dysentery) he had contracted while a prisoner. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sir Orme Bigland Clarke, 4th Baronet CBE (8 October 1880 in Calcutta, India - March 31, 1949) was British lawyer and military officer. (wikipedia.org)
  • made
  • By the end of 1949, over 4,650,000 housespray applications had been made and the United States was declared free of malaria as a significant public health problem. (wikipedia.org)
  • He had a lens manufactured using an identical plastic - Perspex CQ made by ICI - and on 29 November 1949 at St Thomas' Hospital, Harold Ridley achieved the first implant of an intraocular lens. (collectgbstamps.co.uk)
  • point
  • The "scientific experiments" exposed during the trials lead to the Nuremberg Code, developed in 1949 as a ten-point code of human experimentation ethics. (wikipedia.org)
  • short
  • citation needed] After a brief stay with the teacher was cut short by malaria, he returned to the U.S. to weigh the merits of academia and monasticism. (wikipedia.org)
  • remain
  • Despite negative assessments from colleagues, Schilling would remain in charge of the malaria station for the duration of the war. (wikipedia.org)
  • member
  • He was a professor of parasitology at the University of Berlin and a member of Malaria Commission of the League of Nations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another
  • In arguing that case, this article will also use another phrase - the proverb 'necessity is the mother of invention' . (jmvh.org)
  • public
  • Daniel Sledge and George Mohler (2013), "Eliminating Malaria in the American South," American Journal of Public Health. (wikipedia.org)
  • The government's case against her collapsed when the public group supposed to weigh her recompense for the book's sedition, praised her for accurately telling of their experiences. (wikipedia.org)